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Jesus did not blaspheme his own law. "Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth:" The context of "likeness" refers to idol worship. Jesus' coming to earth was a fulfillment of prophecy, not a contradiction to the 10 ...


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Firstly, if Jesus is God, it is of course impossible for Him to blaspheme against His own law. Secondly, Jesus did not overtly claim to be God directly and consequently inevitably stumble the lost sheep of Israel that He was sent to. He answered the question: The high priest said to him, “I charge you under oath by the living God: Tell us if you are ...


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The question, as it stands, really isn't soluable. Reason #1: The Crucifixion raises other Trinitarian questions First and foremost, the Trinity itself is hard enough to understand. There is no good analogy and any attempt to make one will necessarily fail by over emphasizing oneness or threeness. Worse, the Crucifixion and death of Christ means that ...


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God is not a Man It seems that the impetus for the question relies on the meaning of Numbers 23:19 Numbers 23:19 (NASB) (emphasis added) God is not a man, that He should lie, Nor a son of man, that He should repent; Has He said, and will He not do it? Or has He spoken, and will He not make it good. What is God attempting to communicate? The context ...


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This is a very good question. How could God justifiably do the following: Tell the Jews (via Moses) to stone anyone claiming to be God Send a man (Jesus) to the Jews claiming to be God Condemn the Jews for stoning the man claiming to be God. Here's the justification: Jesus shouldn't have been crucified because he actually was God, not a man claiming to ...


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From John Gill's exposition of this passage: For he shall not speak of himself: as Christ, the Son, spoke not of himself in opposition to the Father, so the Spirit speaks not of himself in opposition either to the Father, or the Son, but in perfect agreement with both; being, as of the same nature and essence, power and glory, so of the same mind, ...



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