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Introduction In language, words convey a meaning or idea. Much like the word Trinity conveys a theological concept that most protestants believe is found in scripture, the word "Trinity" itself is never found. This word was coined to describe an idea which previously had no accurate descriptor. Similarly, while the word ὁμοούσιος (homooúsios) which means ...


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In addition to the references in Staples' answer, there is a statement in the book of Doctrine & Covenants: The Father has a body of flesh and bones as tangible as man’s; the Son also; but the Holy Ghost has not a body of flesh and bones, but is a personage of Spirit. Were it not so, the Holy Ghost could not dwell in us. D&C 130:22 I'd also ...


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The teaching that Jesus Christ is "of same substance with the Father" is evident in the Bible. Pauline Witness Galatians 4:8, Romans 1:20 and Acts 17:29 all spoke of God's nature (divinity) and in Colossians 2:9, Jesus is said to be having God's very own nature in his bodily existence. For the entire fullness of God's nature dwells bodily in Christ, ...


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I am a Latter Day Saint, so I can answer this. For a more fully answer, I recommend that you go to http://everyverse.org/god-triune/ (which is a site I created - feel free to comment or ask questions there to reach me). But here below are some thoughts: FATHER AND SON HAVE/ARE SEPARATE SPIRITS: - Luke 23:26 Father, into thy hands I commend my spirit: and ...


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Based on your comments, I understand that you are interested if any sort of ontological arguments have been made for the existence of God in a Trinity; and not whether "The Ontological Argument" - usually assumed to mean the medieval argument of Anselm of Canterbury for the existence of God - has been used to prove that God exists in a Trinity. Oxford ...


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The definite article ὁ appears in the Greek of Mt. 28:19: "Going therefore teach ye all nations: baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Ghost [τοῦ ἁγίου πνεύματος]." τοῦ is the genitive declension of the definite article ὁ. In Acts 5:3, the definite article is used twice: And Peter said, "Ananias, why hath Satan ...



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