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9

It seems virtually undisputed that Theophilus of Antioch (d. 183) is your man. He wrote in Greek: [God's creations on the first three days--light, sky, and vegetation--] are types of the Trinity, of God, and His Word, and His wisdom. And the fourth [day, the creation of the moon and stars,] is the type of man, who needs light, that so there may be God, ...


6

I don't think I could improve upon the summary at the Orthodox Wiki: Objections on doctrinal grounds It is contrary to Scripture, particularly in John 15:26: "But when the Helper comes, whom I shall send to you from the Father, the Spirit of truth who proceeds from the Father, He will testify of Me." Thus, Christ never describes the Holy Spirit ...


5

1.The Jewish and Islamic concept of God is the same: one God, one person, one mind.This is same in Talmud, a central text of Rabbinic Judaism written between 200 CE/AD- 500 CE/AD.Thus it is different from the Triune God of Trinitarian Christianity, God as three persons, three minds, co-equal and co-eternal, one in essence, nature, power, action, and will. ...


4

The term the Nicene Creed uses for substance is homooúsios. This term was intentionally chosen to separate the Creed from various forms of Arianism that denied the divinity of Jesus. The Nicene Creed is arguing that Jesus is fully divine just like the Father. The common forms of nontrinitarianism at the time commonly denied the divinity of Christ by arguing ...


3

I've seen a few candidates put forward. Valentinus the Gnostic (100 - 160) Writing about two hundred years later against the Arian heresy, Marcellus of Ancyra (himself possibly a Sabellian) wrote: These then teach three hypostases, just as Valentinus the heresiarch first invented in the book entitled by him On the Three Natures. For he was the first to ...


3

Yes, it's long! Yes, I know this is a long answer. Sorry about that! However, given the huge amount of ink (and pixels) that has been expended on the doctrine of the Trinity for almost two thousand years now, I do not see how justice can be done to the subject in the brief answers that are preferred here on StackExchange. I therefore ask for your patience ...


2

The phrase “God of God” means that a person came from a person ( like an offspring from a parent) and that they are of same nature. It is analogous to the phrase “Human of Human,” That is, a human offspring of a human parent. To beget is to produce someone to have one’s nature. Seth is begotten of Adam. Seth and Adam are of same nature. A human person ...


2

Tertullian did not have the benefit of the Johannine comma (1 John 5:7), so he appears to have taken a bold step forward in talking about the Trinity. Roger E. Olson, Christopher Alan Hall (The Trinity, page 31) say that Tertullian stumbles in his attempts to explain trinitarian relationships, but despite occasional missteps is a reliable guide and avoids ...


2

To say "The Son and the Father are of the same substance" (consubstantialem as the word is in the Latin Niceno-Constantinopolitan Creed) is to say that they have the same being (ousia in Greek); that is, that they are the same kind of thing—God. Traditionally, Catholic theology has said that even though the Son and the Father are of the same substance ...


2

The Nicene Creed originally had no filioque clause, which was a western innovation centuries later. The Creed simply said that the Holy Spirit proceeded “from the Father,” and the Council of Ephesus, 431, expressly forbade any alteration other than by another ecumenical council. The problem was not only that the eastern Church accepted the Nicene Creed in ...


2

Orthodox explanations of this apparant paradox centre on drawing a subtle distinction between the attributes manifested by the incarnated Christ versus the inherant attributes of the glorified eternal Son of God. According to the creeds, they are one and the same person - there is no distinction in their essential nature - however, the scriptures tell us: ...


1

There is already a question on this site that addresses (1) whether the Word (i.e., the Son) is truly God, like the Father; and (2) whether Jesus Christ is fully God, and goes over the most important Scriptural passages to justify both claims. Have a look at What are the biblical arguments against Arianism? As that question makes clear, the questions you are ...


1

Your 'logic' is flawed. You are missing the implied direction of the 'is' statements - they go in towards the centre, but not out from the centre. This means that the diagram does not imply A is B, and B is C; rather it is implying A is B, and C is B (as well as D is B). 'Is' is not necessarily identity (and not in this case), it can also be used for ...



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