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15

Yes, Catholics do believe that the bread and wine are transformed into the body and blood. Sort of. The "sort of" is because the technicalities of it go back to Aristotelian philosophy, which greatly influenced Thomas Aquinas, who is still in many ways the preeminent theologian of the Catholic Church. Before we get to Aquinas, though, let's look at the ...


10

Side note: The issue isn't really about the doctrine of sola scriptura, but rather about literalism. "Sola scriptura" is a term used by Protestants to mean that we believe scripture is the only ultimate authority, as opposed to Catholic doctrines that the teachings of the Church fathers have equivalent or comparable authority to scripture. But nothing in ...


9

Most adherents of sola scriptura are memorialist in their understanding of the Eucharist. This means they believe Jesus was using a metaphor (albeit one God had intentionally set up beforehand). In the same way that the Scapegoat prefigured Christ, or the Rock that Moses beat instead of struck prefigured Christ, so too the bread in the Passover prefigured ...


7

Transubstantiation occurs during the consecratory thanksgiving during the single act of worship called the liturgy of the Eucharist. 1377 The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist. http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P41.HTM During Mass the liturgy of the ...


7

There are several churches which use the idea of transubstantiation; but the Eastern churches (Eastern Orthodox, Oriental Orthodox, and Assyrian Church of the East) share a similar view on how it works. I'll therefore split my discussion into two parts, the "Eastern" and "Western" views. Eastern View The Eastern churches have occasionally used the term ...


5

Yes, this is the teaching of the Catholic Church. The Catechism of the Catholic Church states: 1366 The Eucharist is thus a sacrifice because it re-presents (makes present) the sacrifice of the cross, because it is its memorial and because it applies its fruit: [Christ], our Lord and God, was once and for all to offer himself to God the Father by ...


5

How is this explained in the transubstantiation belief system? According to Catholic doctrine, the mechanism of transubstantiation is a mystery and a miracle. The physical process is not explained. From Pope Paul VI, The Mystery of Faith, that is, the ineffable gift of the Eucharist that the Catholic Church received from Christ, her Spouse, as a pledge ...


5

On the contrary, St John of Damascus himself says: since it is man's custom to eat and to drink water and wine, He connected His divinity with these and made them His body and blood in order that we may rise to what is supernatural through what is familiar and natural. The body which is born of the holy Virgin is in truth body united with divinity, not ...


5

Why are we "eating" the flesh and blood of Christ? 1. Because Jesus commanded us to In the institution of the Eucharist, Jesus explicitly commands us to eat the bread and drink the wine, saying "This do in remembrance of me." Indeed, as often as we do this, we do "proclaim the Lord's death until He come." Indeed, John goes even further, recording Jesus in ...


4

Exactly when during the Mass does transubstantiation occur? It occurs when a priest, in persona Christi (in the person of Christ), says the Words of Institution. Even though the complete words of institution are necessary, the common view of theologians is that the eight words, "this is my body" and "this is my blood", are on their own the necessary and ...


3

Simple answer: Not all The opinions of the early Reformers were divided on this issue, with Luther on one end of the spectrum: When asked whether Lutherans should do away with the Elevation of the Host in the liturgy, Luther consistently replied in 1544: By no means, for such abrogation would tend to diminish respect for the Sacrament and cause it to ...


3

Sola-scriptura Christians interpret them figuratively, not literally. Shortest answer ever. :) Same reason we don't believe God is literally a rock, a tower, a shield, or a hen, even though scripture describes Him in all those ways. Same reason we don't believe Jesus is literally a lamb, a lion, a piece of bread, a door, a vine, etc... These are all word ...


3

The Catholic Church believes that this has been the tradition since "the beginning" of the Church. Firstly, according to the Church, Christ makes it very clear in John 6:41-58 that the literal, physical consumption of His body is ultimately intended. The phrasing used in this passage, particularly in the Greek, is very unambiguous. As compared to other ...


3

Form General Instruction of the Roman Missal (319-324): Following the example of Christ, the Church has always used bread and wine with water to celebrate the Lord’s Supper. The bread for celebrating the Eucharist must be made only from wheat, must be recently baked, and, according to the ancient tradition of the Latin Church, must be unleavened. ...


2

Although I am not a Catholic I believe I can answer your question more determinately. The only place where the exact instant seems to have been conjectured within Roman Catholic tradition is by St. Thomas in the Summa Theologica, Part 3, Question 75, ‘Article 7. Whether this change is wrought instantaneously? And therefore it must be said that this ...


2

Jumping off a bit from fredsbend's answer ... 1377 The Eucharistic presence of Christ begins at the moment of the consecration and endures as long as the Eucharistic species subsist. (http://www.vatican.va/archive/ENG0015/__P41.HTM) Consecration, in general, is a sort of declaration of an objects use for a purpose. In this case, it's the ...


2

Good question! The Transubstantiation is the spiritual AND physical process where the Eucharist changes into Jesus's real Body and real Blood at the hands of the Priest. Summary Jesus states at the last supper that "... this IS My Body..." As Catholics, we believe that He is telling us to have faith enough to believe His words. At the first supper and at ...


2

Great question! I will attempt to explain this from my Catholic roots, as well as my current non-denominational standpoint - both of which were similar, though I hold that not every church, even Catholic, is 100% the same. We take Jesus' divinity into account. He is the Lord God's only Son, the Lord God in the Flesh, and the Word/Truth - He was present at ...


1

I think that there are 2 questions being answered. One is a question of the real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. The other question is, if Christ is really present in the Eucharist would that mean he has infinite mass ? This second question calls up images of an almost infinite sized human being which seems to make the real presence of Christ in the ...


1

Lutherans believe in Sola Scriptura, but they also believe in Real Presence (not transubstantiation). The big difference is between that and transubstantiation, there is no changing of the elements to the point that they also cease to be bread/wine. The Lutheran position is the elements become the true blood and body of Christ (both physically and ...


1

If a person is to understand the Word of God as He intends, he or she must read what the authors wrote as they intended it. If a passage was written as literal history, we should take it as literal history. If it's personal opinion, it's personal opinion. If it's allegorical, metaphorical, or poetic, we should take it as allegory, metaphor, or poetry. So, ...


1

The doctrine of transubstantion has a long and storied past within the Roman Catholic Church, dating back at least to Augustine, if not further. It continues to be the dogmatic profession to this day. After all, when Jesus says, Lo, I am with you always, here to it would apply. As you say, the doctrine of transubstantion states that the wine and the bread ...



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