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15

Most scholars dismiss this is as fiction. Indeed the Catholic Encyclopedia brings up multiple variations on the story, each of which can be easily debunked. Perhaps the most damning proof that this is a legend would stem from the fact that nobody - including enemies at the time - ever made such accusations. From Wikipedia: It is also notable that ...


14

Luke 20:36 and they can no longer die; for they are like the angels Suggests: no


14

He most likely was crucified naked - this is consistent with the biblical narrative of the guards casting lots for his garment and with standard historical practice. In the paintings, the artists wanted to preserve some of the dignity and not turn the Lord's body into something that puerile youngsters might be titilated by. It is a condescension to the ...


13

The new Jerusalem that comes from heaven in Rev 19 is "prepared as a bride adorned for her husband." (emphasis added) However, I would understand why some might think that Jerusalem is Christ's bride. In the Old Testament, Israel (or Judah or Jerusalem) is described as God's wife: For thy Maker is thine husband; the LORD of hosts is his name; and thy ...


13

One of the defining tenets of Protestant Christianity is sola scriptura--that the Scriptures are the fundamental basis for all doctrine. This is in contrast to extra-biblical teachings. The idea is that if it were important enough for us to know, God would have told us in the Scriptures themselves and not have us rely on extra-biblical teachings. ...


13

[...] MONASTIC STYLES Both men and women traditionally had their hair cut or removed in specific ways when they entered a monastery or convent. These haircuts symbolized religious devotion, group identity, and humility as well as the renunciation of worldly things and personal vanity. The practice may relate to ancient rites in which people in ...


13

According to Emmanouela Grypeou and Helen Spurling (The Book of Genesis in Late Antiquity, Brill 2013, p71ff), the earliest Christian reference to this idea is Origen (c. 184-253), who traces it to Jewish tradition: Concerning the place of the skull, it came to me that Hebrews hand down [the tradition that] the body of Adam has been buried there; in ...


12

Less than 1011. More than 7. Assuming that: Adam only had one wife (Eve), which is an argument based strictly on a lack of evidence That Eve's normal gestational period was 9 months and had twins no more than average (1 in 86). That Eve lived approximately the same amount of time as Adam (again an argument from lack of evidence), then we can say: 800 ...


12

The "double" cross is known as a Patriarchal cross and is well described in the Wikipedia article. There's no point in reproducing more than a sample here: The Patriarchal cross is a variant of the Christian cross, the religious symbol of Christianity. Similar to the familiar Latin cross, the Patriarchal cross possesses a smaller crossbar placed above ...


11

It's not a purely Christian tradition. Other religions practice this as well. There's an article here on ehow.com that gives an overview of the origins of the practice. Some highlights: According to "Ethnicity and the American Cemetery," the feet of the deceased face east as well. This tradition is based on the belief that when Jesus returns, the ...


10

There is definitely precedent: As Christians, we should be following the example set by Christ, who gave thanks before feeding the multitudes in Matthew 14:19-21 and Matthew 15:34-36. He also did so in Luke 24:30. Matthew 14:19-21 King James Version (KJV) 19 And he commanded the multitude to sit down on the grass, and took the five loaves, ...


10

This is part two of a two part answer. See my previous post for general arguments. Specific books Matthew External - On Matthew Papias writes, "Matthew collected the oracles in the Hebrew language, and each interpreted them as best he could.". This is probably the most debated phrase in all of the patristic writings - the words translated as "oracles", ...


10

The first recorded instance of the tradition comes from Hegesippus, a second century Christian writer. Unfortunately, his works have been lost, except for a small portion of his writings quoted by later authors. In his Church History (c. 325), Eusibius writes: But Hegesippus, who lived immediately after the apostles, gives the most accurate account ...


10

This tradition is known to us by the writings of the Church historian Eusebius of Caesarea who himself quotes the writing of Hegesippus (Ἡγήσιππος), a chronicler of the early Church. In his Ecclesiastical History (Ἐκκλησιαστικὴ Ἱστορία), Book II, Ch. XXIII, Eusebius wrote, 3 The words of Clement (already provided earlier) indicated the manner of James’ ...


9

The origin of the Christmas tree is very well documented elsewhere, including Wikipedia. There are some Christians that disapprove of the use of a Christmas tree (one reason documented also at wikipedia, and further discussed (with rebuttal) here). There are some groups that do not use Christmas trees, for various reasons. Some Amish do not use Christmas ...


9

This answer is based on the article Christians and the Roman Army AD173-337 by John Helgeland (Church History 43(2):149-163, 200; 1974). The start date of AD173 is the year when we have the first evidence (after the NT) of Christians in the military - in Legio XII Fulminata (the Lightning Legion) under Marcus Aurelius. Prohibitions on members of the (Roman) ...


9

She was probably between 13 and 14 years old according to the Catholic Encyclopedia in the section entitled "Mary's pregnancy becomes known to Joseph": From the age at which Hebrew maidens became marriageable, it is possible that Mary gave birth to her Son when she was about thirteen or fourteen years of age. No historical document tells us how old she ...


9

As I understand it all Jewish brides are stolen, they are snatched away. All Jewish brides were said to be “stolen, caught up, or snatched up by surprise.” The bride was then led to the groom’s house by a wedding procession of women carrying lighted lamps, similar to the Parable of the Ten Virgins that we will explore in next month’s Personal ...


9

As far as we can tell, Christian twice-weekly fasting was based on Jewish twice-weekly fasting. Given the later tension between Jews and Christians, this makes an early adoption date likely. Further evidence comes from the Didache (dating probably to the first century): Your fasts should not be with the hypocrites, for they fast on Mondays and ...


9

Well, the word "manna" itself means "What is it?" so I'm not sure you're going to find a perfectly satisfactory answer to your question. :-) In addition, it was created supernaturally by God, and He didn't share the recipe. :-) Since it was a single miracle, and not something that people still eat today, no one really knows personally what it tastes like. ...


9

The Book of Jashar is mentioned in two places in the Bible: 2 Samuel 1:18 (NASB) and he told them to teach the sons of Judah the song of the bow; behold, it is written in the book of Jashar. Joshua 10:12-13 (NASB) Then Joshua spoke to the Lord in the day when the Lord delivered up the Amorites before the sons of Israel, and he said in the sight of ...


9

In support of the idea that it did not rain is the very next verse: Genesis 2:6 But a mist went up from the earth and watered the whole face of the ground. No further mention is made of rain until the Flood account. Anything beyond this is conjecture on our part.


9

This is part one of a two part post The assertion in a comment on the question that no scholar "believes that the books were authored by the names on the books" is just plain false. The only way one can even come close to this conclusion is by dismissing all scholarship from conservatives out of hand as "not objective", a severe version of the genetic ...


8

Concerning the council of Elvira, which was attended by nineteen bishops from all parts of the Peninsula http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/05395b.htm and could hardly be considered incumbent on the entirety of the Christendom in a place where The Jews were so numerous and so powerful in Spain during the first centuries of the Christian era that ...


8

The Catholic "tradition" is just that. It is not an official teaching or doctrine, but rather something one is free to believe. The Church does not take a physiological stance on whether or not Mary experienced pain during child birth. But to understand where this tradition came from, we have to go back to the Garden of Eden. When Adam and Eve sinned, God ...


8

Though I personally tend to favour expository preaching in practice, topical preaching certainly has its place. Scriptural Basis A case could be made from Scriptural example... Jesus's Preaching Jesus's recorded preaching was purely topical - as far as I know, he never took a passage from the Old Testament and expanded on it. Rather, he chose topics ...


8

One answer that has been suggested is the Infancy Gospel of James (AKA The Protoevangelium of James). This document dates to roughly the middle of the second century and focuses largely on the person of Mary from her birth to the birth of Jesus. As the central character, Mary's honor and purity are defended in great detail. Mary's virginity is repeatedly ...


8

Catholicism doesn't currently set a specific age at which First Communion is taken. The New Advent article on Communion of Children says this (Emphasis mine): The existing legislation with regard to the Communion of children has been definitely settled by the Fourth Lateran Council, which was afterwards confirmed by the authority of the Council of ...



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