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20

You're reading way too much into this :) In order to appreciate this song, I think you need to allow for variation of meaning in the English language. Understanding some songs even require that we grant them some poetic license, although I think we should treat those with caution because consciously or otherwise those do tend to cloud our theology. However ...


14

The reason that something may be considered a sin primarily because it hurts your relationship with God. When God has ordered the world in a certain way, or decrees that certain things are not to His will, then going against it is a sin. A sin isn't something that is bad for others. It's bad for ourselves. So to judge something as sinful because it hurts ...


12

INTRODUCTION Your specific question is not overly clear, but it seems you are essentially asking if there is any doctrine worth dividing over, and you mention the many denominations that exist as problematic. I'm reminded of the satirical quote by Steve Turner: We believe that all religions are basically the same, at least the one we read was. They ...


11

I think here the meaning of "indebted" is simply in the sense that you are thankful, not in the sense that you'll have a bill come later.


11

The term is typically applied by Dispensational Theologians when referencing Covenant Theology. Dispensationalists believe that God is relating to the church during the church age, which we're in right now, however, he related to the Jews during the Mosaic period, using the Mosaic law. They don't believe, however, that the church has replaced Israel, but ...


11

From what I recall, the major impact of the Dead Sea Scrolls is that it validated the accuracy of the Hebrew Old Testament scriptures. Prior to the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls, the earliest Hebrew manuscripts of the Old Testament were dated around 920 A.D. The Dead Sea Scrolls date back to around 100 B.C. With this gap of about a thousand years, ...


10

While I'm not 100% certain I understand your question. If you're asking what I think; Jesus implied that the will of the Father, Son, and Spirit are separate, as He spoke a lot about the Father's will. John 6:40, NIV For my Father's will is that everyone who looks to the Son and believes in him shall have eternal life, and I will raise him up at the ...


10

The kind of comparison you are suggesting is not going to work for a number of reasons. The most prominent one is a huge difference in job description between those that different denominations consider church leaders. The Catholic church, for example, ordains priests based on several years of college-level education, as well as other requirements, academic ...


9

A few points: The "bunch of kids who made fun of Elijah's bald spot" were not a bunch of kids, (the KJV's translation is quite unfortunate here,) but a bunch of youths (meaning teens or young men.) It was Elisha, not Elijah, that they were making fun of, and laughing at him for being bald wasn't their offense. This incident took place soon after Elijah's ...


9

Christopher Wright authors the book Knowing Jesus Through the Old Testament to help modern day Christians make a correlation between Old Testament Israel and the Messiah-ship of Jesus Christ. I think this is the best resource for the answer to this question and the full text can be found here Wright begins his book by making the assertion that the Jesus of ...


9

According to the doctrines of Sola Scriptura, and Biblical Infallibility we already have completed revelation from God in the Bible, and this revelation is sufficient for us to know all that God desires of/for us: "All Scripture is God-breathed and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, for training in righteousness; so that the man of God may ...


9

Essentially, no: there is no language specified for religious use in Christianity. From the early days of the Church, there was variety in religious language. The Western Church primarily spoke Latin (the vernacular) while the Eastern Church spoke Greek (again, the vernacular). Various churches have languages that have special status, especially for ...


8

No, there is only one truth. And it doesn't change because it is the person of God himself. The problem is, our understanding is very limited and marred by sin. I quite honestly wish I was right more of the time, but quite frankly I'm wrong an awful lot. The history of Christianity is littered with confusing tracks taken by folks who interpreted one issue ...


8

This may be redundant, but from a Sola Scriptura/Biblical Literalist/Protestant/Evangelical/Fundamentalist view... Is Christianity defined by the Bible? If so, is belief in the Bible the most important (or foundational) belief in Christianity? Is it the basis of Christianity? Yes. Christianity is the faith in the God of the Bible. ...


8

There is more to polytheism than simply believing in multiple divine beings. One of the hallmarks of polytheism is multiple gods, each with their own domain and their own agenda. To use a culturally familiar example, in the Greek pantheon, Zeus was the father of the gods, god of the sky and thunder and lightning. Hera was his consort, and she was ...


8

I think Philippians chapter 2 shares some good light on this: 5 ...Christ Jesus, 6 Who, existing in the form of God, did not consider being equal with God a treasure to be grasped, 7 But emptied Himself, taking the form of a slave, becoming in the likeness of men; 8 And being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself, becoming obedient even unto ...


8

Lazarus and others died of the "first death" and were raised back to the same earthly body as before they died. Their ultimate fate was still to be determined, be it everlasting life or the "second death" on judgement day. Jesus died of the "second death" to pay the penalty of death for believers. He was raised up in full glory as a conquerer, and it is ...


7

"O to grace, how great a debtor, daily I'm constrained to be." Is essentially the poetic way of saying: Every day I'm made to realize how much I owe everything to grace. It doesn't need to mean a literal being in debt - it just happens that the language of debt is used to express such ideas. We might also put it: Every day I'm made to realize ...


7

From a Biblical perspective, the Egyptians would have descended from Noah, but not from Abraham. Genesis 10 is considered the "Table of Nations" in the Bible as it details how the sons of Noah began to populate the earth. The tower of Babel in Genesis 11 is also a very significant event. God had commanded Noah (like He had Adam) to fill the earth. The ...


7

The following recent books are very popular and explore the topic. I have read the first two and heard some sermons from the third. Books: The Attributes of God by A. W. Tozer Knowing God J.I Packer The Attributes of God by A.W. Pink Tozer's sermons are easily found, for example here. http://www.sermonaudio.com/sermoninfo.asp?SID=8130752728 Common ideas ...


7

No, I do not believe so. A general theme in the Tanakh ("Old Testament") is the rebellion and faithlessness of the Israelites. This couldn't possibly be typical of the Messiah. However, the Messiah is indeed "Israel." Elsewhere in the Tanakh, the Messiah is referred to by the name "David," his ancestor (cp. Jer. 30:9; Eze. 37:24-25; Hos. 3:5). In the same ...


7

The "Just War" is a concept very widely accepted by Christians - at least in the sense of acknowledging that there are conditions when Christians are called to fight. Catholics accept it, Anglicans do in principle (though some disagree), so do Lutherans, and many Baptists. They may not all agree on the conditions for fighting a 'just war', but they do ...


6

Sin is not defined as such by any level of hurt caused to a human being. Sin is, in fact, "missing the mark"; the word has it's roots in the target-shooting of an archer - sin is, in effect, to miss the bulls-eye. First and foremost sin is any failure to live up to the perfect law of God, including all it's moral statutes. For the Jews, this included the ...


6

The Short Answer: No. And, AFAIK, there are no Mormon teachings at all that have spread to other traditions. Here's why. Ecclesiologists who study the history of the church sometimes distinguish between four primary "branches" of christendom: the Roman Catholic church, the Eastern Orthodox church, the Protestant church, and the "bible cults." Protestant ...


6

First, a disclaimer: Theistic evolution (TE) is neither a theological system nor an alternative to mainstream evolutionary science. TE is an awkward label applied to people who accept evolutionary theory and also believe in God. Those who claim this label are not a unified group. The following is my own understanding, which is still evolving. The early ...


6

I'm not sure if this is too simplisitic, but I think the answer is that although God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit are all equally God, this does not mean that they are all the same being. We see this when Jesus came to earth, not God the Father; God the Father and Jesus send the Holy Spirit at pentecost - they are not the Holy Spirit. We see in the ...


6

You're not going to find one answer on this. To some, the existence of God is self-evident, to others it's not. Then you get into "what does self-evident mean". Some of those who say God is self-evident claim so because the complexity of creation screams "an intelligent designer made me". But that's not self-evident, it's evidence from creation. ...


6

Once - in two different ways depending on our definition of 'begotten' There seems to be some confusion on the subject because "only begotten" a theological term does not mean "begotten" a biblical term. But to answer your question, if thinking 'begotten' as in 'only begotten' it gains prominence in Council of Nicaea in A.D. 325 representing Christ’s ...


6

I think you've missed some key points in your imagined scenario. It wasn't "a simple message of love" spread by a few ordinary fisherman. Jesus wasn't some hippie revolutionary who got a bunch of followers to parade around telling everybody they should just love each other. What made Christianity appealing was that it was true. This would have been much ...


6

Al-Hallaj was a sufi mystic from ~900 years after the time of Jesus. He was enamored of the Jesus he knew of, but his own sources and influence were primarily Islamic and his idea of who Jesus was matches the non-divine prophet of Islamic teaching rather that the divine savior of Christianity. He tried to live after the pattern of the stories he had and used ...



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