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9

The question I will try to answer is: Can anyone please offer any explanation as to how a totally-good God can create evil deliberately and still remain holy and righteous? I will attempt to explain this from the point of Original Sin. This is becuse I myself struggled to understand this for some time and found that this can be explained better from that ...


6

Yes... A majority of Christian traditions recognize on some level that we will and even must suffer. The author and perfecter of our faith was hung on a tree. As his followers, we can expect pretty much more of the same. 1 Peter 4:12-14 (ESV) 12  Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though ...


5

Opening The Church does not base her theology on rebutting, as in this case, the arguments advanced by the Grand Inquisitor parable. The Church's theology delves into Divine Revelation = Sacred Scripture + [Holy] Tradition. Nevertheless, the Church's theology can rebut those kinds of arguments. In line with the criteria for answers on this site, this post ...


4

The answer to this question is always "Yes" in the Bible. If Jesus suffered we ought to suffer as well as we must partake in everything Jesus took. We suffer with him. We die with him. We'll live with him. 2 Timothy 2:12 If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us When Jesus was being led to Golgotha Luke ...


4

For Isaiah and Amos, this is an issue in translation. The Hebrew word for "evil" is [ra']. This word also means: bad, spoiled, calamity, hurt, trouble, etc. So [ra'] could be used to both describe spoiled milk, and a city leveled by an earthquake. In english evil is evil. You wouldn't call spoiled milk evil, you would say it is bad, or spoiled. In ...


3

This question is not that different from God hardening Pharaohs heart.  It has never personally bothered me though many other things have. They way many take this is simply that for sin, God often punished sinners by heading them over to greater sin.  God can't properly temp men to sin or directly create sin, or cause more sin, but indirectly through sinful ...


3

The argument usually made is something like this: God created everything Evil exists So God created evil The problem with this argument is its second premise that evil is something. The fact is evil is not a thing it is a lack or privation of good thing that God made. Christian Philosopher J. P. Moreland notes: "Evil is a lack of goodness. ...


3

The Doors of the Sea by David Bentley Hart, from an Orthodox perspective. The Justification Of God by John Piper, from a Reformed perspective. This book is more focused on the question of how can God be called good if he has sovereignly ordained that some people be damned, but the existence of God is clearly an implication of that question. As it's written ...


3

Some Christians suffer more than others, but all Christians are guaranteed to suffer a little bit due to 2 Tim 3:12. You won't have to look for ways to suffer, you will suffer primarily because of Gal 4:29. The one born after the flesh (the unsaved world or the carnal nature in a believing Christian) is guaranteed to persecute those who walk in his Holy ...


3

You are right that the idea of evil as the absence of good is traditionally associated with Augustine. As far as I understand your specific idea, you are positing that 'absence of good' is necessary for anything that is not God, or that nothing aside from God can be wholly good. This reminds me, more than anything else, of the Gnostic world-view, wherein ...


2

I struggled with this for many years until I read the book of Romans 9:12-23. Especially, these verses say it all Romans 9 18 Therefore hath he mercy on whom he will have mercy, and whom he will he hardeneth. 19 Thou wilt say then unto me, Why doth he yet find fault? For who hath resisted his will? 20 Nay but, O man, who art thou that ...


1

Augustine, and other Christian leaders ignore scripture on this point. Isaiah 45:7 ("I form the light and create darkness; I make peace and create evil; I am the Lord that does all these things") and Deuteronomy 30:15-20 ("See, I have set before you this day life and good and death and evil . . . .therefore choose life that you may live, you and your seed; ...


1

One could argue that Augustine saw hints of this argument in Scripture: I am the LORD, and there is no other, besides me there is no God; I equip you, though you do not know me, that people may know, from the rising of the sun and from the west, that there is none besides me; I am the LORD, and there is no other. I form light and create ...


1

The ancient tradition is clear on this matter: "…if we are ashamed to imitate our Lord’s sufferings, which He endured for us, and to suffer as He suffered, it is obvious that we shall not become partakers with Him in His glory. If that is true of us we shall be believers in word only, not in deed. When deeds are absent, our faith is dead." St. ...


1

Does The Bible Say God Created Evil (Sin)? KJV: I form the light, and create darkness: I make peace, and create evil: I the LORD do all these [things]. This generates some confusion, because the "evil" God creates does not necessarily match our definition of "evil" (more on this in the next section). We can try reading other translations and ...


1

This is the classic question of "theodicy" which is often viewed as a philosophical problem within the theology of God. A reformed perspective on this question is that the highest good in the universe is that God is glorified, which means for God to be publicly portrayed as "good," or more specifically for God to put his attributes on display via ...


1

So you're asking "how". The best explanation I've heard is an analogy with Shakespeare writing the story Macbeth. In the story, Macbeth kills the king. Now, in the context of the story, is Macbeth guilty for killing the king? Absolutely: he did it! Is Shakespeare guilty of killing the king? No, he didn't kill anyone. Could Macbeth have done differently? No, ...


1

I'm not quite sure if you are asking about the problem of evil or the amount of natural evil in the world. I will take a stab at them both. In regards to the problem of evil we have certain considerations. Now when God created us humans he had two choices in regards to free will. He could have given us no free will and with controlled us and made sure that ...



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