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42

This is called the problem of theodicy. The assumptions usually made in the problem statement are, with a little variance: God is almighty and all-knowing God does not want evil in the world God is good The problem goes on to state the fact that there is evil in the world, and claims a contradiction between the assumptions and this observation. I see ...


19

From the perspective of a non-Christian, the explanation you put forth makes no sense. It relies on a number of assumptions that a non-Christian doesn't necessarily hold. Regardless of whether it makes sense in the context of your belief system, it does not make sense to a non-Christian. For example: If evil is the result of the actions of Adam and Eve, ...


13

There is an assumption in this question that is actually the very problem that the question addresses. This question assumes that in the exact same situation you would act differently than Adam and Eve would. However, why would you? Would a loving God not have placed the people in the garden that gave humanity the best chance at continuing at sinless ...


9

The question I will try to answer is: Can anyone please offer any explanation as to how a totally-good God can create evil deliberately and still remain holy and righteous? I will attempt to explain this from the point of Original Sin. This is becuse I myself struggled to understand this for some time and found that this can be explained better from that ...


8

I think you have a good reason for why evil exists, but I would follow that with suffering exists because evil exists. I don't agree that all suffering is punishment from God. He may allow for suffering, because He can use it in our lives to make us perfect. Another root reason is that God allows for our free will. He does not want us to be robot ...


8

Because God gave us free will. He is not interested in puppets on a string who just hop to his commands. He is interested in followers who of their own free will accept the knowledge of God. Free will cannot (Without being internally coherent) exist and the choice to do evil not. So it looks like God could either have created a puppet humanity with no ...


7

It might be nice to believe that anyone who suffers must deserve it because of some evil thing he did, that everyone always gets exactly what he deserves, good or bad. But Christianity does not teach that. As Asfallows and Thomas point out, in John 9 Jesus was specifically asked if a particular case of suffering was punishment for a person's sin, and he ...


7

Yes, your arguments are correct. Here is some expansion and support… The first and best answer to suffering is the freewill defense. For God to make free creatures is worthwhile; truly free creatures are able to act for good or evil. People who cannot do certain things are not truly free. A person needs no other response, but other responses are available ...


7

There are two basic approaches: 1. Blame Mankind Evil and suffering exist because of mankind's disobedience to God. Exactly how this works is more difficult to comprehend. Certainly a lot of suffering is the direct result of man's actions, but other types of suffering - things like natural disasters - can't be justified quite so easily. They may be ...


6

In my understanding there are different kinds of evil. A Christian needs to be able to discern between the different evils that are in this world. God knew that men would be evil, this is probably the reason why He created a realm just for man to reside within because God was probably not willing to let us defile the heavens. God disciplining His children. ...


6

The story of Adam and Eve is not about God punishing us for the sin of one man. God punishes us for our own sins, which we have all committed: for all have sinned and fall short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23 NIV) If anything, the story of Adam and Eve is there not to explain why are punished, but to explain why each person individually chooses to ...


6

Basically anyone that is born, is born of the world, so the act of being conceived brings brings the stain of original sin upon each and every person. There is an interesting article (pdf) that goes through some of the thoughts of the early church fathers that relate to this subject. This is one of the more relevant portions of the article: What had ...


6

Yes... A majority of Christian traditions recognize on some level that we will and even must suffer. The author and perfecter of our faith was hung on a tree. As his followers, we can expect pretty much more of the same. 1 Peter 4:12-14 (ESV) 12  Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though ...


5

So, if I understand you correctly, your question could be alternately summarized as "Does the Bible offer explanations for why certain things happen to certain people?", which is related to (but different from) the age-old question "Why does God let bad things happen to good people?" To my knowledge, there isn't much (if any) canon scripture that directly ...


4

For Isaiah and Amos, this is an issue in translation. The Hebrew word for "evil" is [ra']. This word also means: bad, spoiled, calamity, hurt, trouble, etc. So [ra'] could be used to both describe spoiled milk, and a city leveled by an earthquake. In english evil is evil. You wouldn't call spoiled milk evil, you would say it is bad, or spoiled. In ...


4

Yes, but it's completely unlike "karma." Jewish culture had a sort of assumption that misfortune was a punishment for sin. This came from the obvious explicit warnings of God that "break covenant => misfortune." However, those warnings applied to the covenant people as a whole, not the individual. Apparently somewhere along the road the Rabbis and Pharisees ...


4

I myself has always been partial to the line from the movie "Constantine:" Angela Dodson: I guess God has a plan for all of us. John Constantine: God's a kid with an ant farm, lady. He's not planning anything. Now John's a cynic, and not a believer. In fact, at this point in the film he's about as un-sympathetic as possible without actually being ...


4

The answer to this question is always "Yes" in the Bible. If Jesus suffered we ought to suffer as well as we must partake in everything Jesus took. We suffer with him. We die with him. We'll live with him. 2 Timothy 2:12 If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us When Jesus was being led to Golgotha Luke ...


4

The problem is known as "theodicy". Actually, this is just one portion of the problem of theodicy, but it's part of the "How can a good God permit evil?" question. "How God could create beings that will go to Hell" is subset of the problem of theodicy. This is one of the most commonly covered questions in the field of Apologetics. A Bing/Google/(Choose ...


4

Before continuing, it should be noted that this topic is discussed among theologians, but there is no official teaching which all Catholics are bound to. That's true for most questions which begin with "Why doesn't God just?" This is especially true in a specific case. Your question is one of theodicy. It can be made briefer with "Why do good things happen ...


3

Another argument for a existence of a just God despite the presence of evil is exactly that: the existence of evil. If God does not exist then morality is what humans make of it. If morality is what we make of it, then it shifts with time and location. Yet throughout time and cultures, we see certain moral codes virtually everywhere. Stealing is bad. ...


3

There's a fascinating dissection of Job that I recently read: http://www.bookofjob.org/ It's a pretty long and thorough analysis, but the summary is that God allows evil and suffering to happen because if he didn't then our love would be conditional on his protection from evil and suffering. Just like Satan says about Job, he only loves God because his ...


3

Tim Keller in his book, Reason for God dedicates a chapter to this very issue. I'll provide a preview of what he says... He states it this way: If a good and powerful God exists, he would not allow pointless evil, but because there is much unjustifiable pointless evil in the world, the traditional good and powerful God could not exist. ... Tucked ...


3

Adam and Eve were made perfect, but with free will. They chose to sin. Would we not make the same choice, if we were in their place? Since we've all chosen to sin at some point (Romans 3:10-12) in our lives, I think the answer must be Yes.


3

I don't think He has punished every human for one's mistake. I also don't believe that the world began with Adam and Eve, I think that is the way God used to explain how things worked at that time. And I believe on that based on the scripture when Caem was expelled from paradise and head to a village, if he was going to a village, who lived in this village ...


3

We are not necessarily "being punished". We are not held accountable for their sin. Adam and Eve, our first ancestors, became sinful and we have inherited their sinful nature being born from them. Adam failed where Christ succeeded. That is why we must be "born again". God chose perfectly a man and woman who would represent mankind. Would not all of us at ...


3

This question is not that different from God hardening Pharaohs heart.  It has never personally bothered me though many other things have. They way many take this is simply that for sin, God often punished sinners by heading them over to greater sin.  God can't properly temp men to sin or directly create sin, or cause more sin, but indirectly through sinful ...


3

The argument usually made is something like this: God created everything Evil exists So God created evil The problem with this argument is its second premise that evil is something. The fact is evil is not a thing it is a lack or privation of good thing that God made. Christian Philosopher J. P. Moreland notes: "Evil is a lack of goodness. ...


3

Some Christians suffer more than others, but all Christians are guaranteed to suffer a little bit due to 2 Tim 3:12. You won't have to look for ways to suffer, you will suffer primarily because of Gal 4:29. The one born after the flesh (the unsaved world or the carnal nature in a believing Christian) is guaranteed to persecute those who walk in his Holy ...



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