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In addition to the reward in Mathew as having no specific time line, the reward mentioned in Mark is spiritual. Brothers, sisters, mothers, children, and even homes and fields are spiritual rewards. Seriously, how would receiving material gains such as houses and lands match up expectations of persecution? “Take heed, and beware of covetousness: for a ...


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Another possibility: In chapter 1, John is making an evangelistic appeal to his fellow unsaved Jews (hence his use of "we" and "us") who would claim on God but, without Christ, would be at enmity with Him. Especially note vv. 1-5...these are things believers would already know. A self-righteous Jew, however, would not believe that but would think exactly ...


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Hershel Shanks says, in Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism: A Parallel History of Their Origins and Early Development, page 172, that continuing friction among early Christians over the nature of Jesus is evident in the Johannine epistles. He points out that 1 John criticises ‘secessionists’ who departed in a dispute over the reality of sin (1 John 1:8-10) ...


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It is difficult to accept that contradictions can exist in the Bible, yet this is one of them. Raymond E. Brown says, in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 114, that Luke's account of the death of Judas in Acts 1:18-19 is scarcely reconcilable with that in Matthew 27:3-10. If they can not be reconciled then one or both accounts are not really ...


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Raymond E. Brown says, in An Introduction to the New Testament, page 236, that while Luke's list may be less classically monarchical than Matthew's, there is little likelihood that either is strictly historical. On this view, there is no mistake and no misunderstanding of Jewish genealogies. Brown notes that many try to reconcile the two very different ...


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With Mark, in order to see the context for this promise of Jesus, we need to go back just one verse, to Mark 10:28: Mark 10:28: Then Peter began to say unto him, Lo, we have left all, and have followed thee. By 70 CE, when Mark is now believed to have been written, its author knew that there were followers who had left their "houses, brethren, sisters, ...



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