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Cf. ARTICLE 3 THE SEVEN PETITIONS > VI. "AND LEAD US NOT INTO TEMPTATION" > CCC 2846 CCC 2846 explains that the Greek means both "do not allow us to enter into temptation" and "do not let us yield to temptation." CCC 2846 This petition goes to the root of the preceding one, for our sins result from our consenting to temptation; we therefore ask our ...


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There are three aspects of the law: the principle of the law, the commandments of the law, and the rituals of the law. If you do not differentiate between these three things, we will never have a proper understanding of the law. We know that the principle of the law is over (Gal 5:18; Rom. 10:4). Today, in the dispensation of grace, God does not deal with us ...


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The Old Testament It all comes down to what Jesus means by "the law". In Matthew 5:17-18 "the law and the prophets" to which Jesus refers (v17) is what we Christians call "The Old Testament" and, in context with this, "the law" he refers to (v18) is what is called the Pentateuch (the five books attributed to Moses). Not The Mosaic Law There has been an ...


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I always hear this kind of prayers in catholic but as 6:7 say "But when ye pray, use not vain repetitions, as the heathen do: for they think that they shall be heard for their much speaking." So what is my point? God say Matthew 6:9-13 is just a pattern on how we pray and talk to him, 9b Our Father which art in heaven, Hallowed be thy name. 10 Thy ...


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The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from ...


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John Calvin starts by reminding us that Jesus commanded them to begin at Jerusalem (Acts 1:4,8), and says that it makes sense that they would stay there until "being brought into some other place by his hand": But here may a question be asked, forasmuch as they were commanded to preach the gospel throughout the whole world, (Mark 16:16) why they stayed ...


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The dominant two-source hypothesis says that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were written independently of each other, using material copied from Mark and the hypothetical 'Q' document. At times, the two evangelists had to supplement the material from Mark and Q with further material from other, unknown sources or by making assumptions about what could have ...


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This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


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Most Christians regard God as omniscient and therefore able to know the future, in which case it should not be possible for God to be satisfied with his creation of man, knowing that later he would repent that he made man on earth. Some Christians do accept that the Bible is not necessarily inerrant, and my answer will be consistent with this point of view. ...


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Classical Apologetics is that style of Christian defence that stresses rational arguments for the existence of God and uses evidence to substantiate biblical claims and miracles. This question does not deal with proving the existence of God, but how apologists deal with claims of biblical inerrancy. In any debate on biblical inerrancy, the apologist knows ...



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