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10

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


9

The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from ...


9

Christians who believe in the inerrancy or infallibility of the Bible argue that these two accounts are not contradictory: that Jesus met his followers in both Jerusalem and Galilee after his resurrection. Such an argument first requires establishing that there was a lengthy period of time between the resurrection and the ascension, and that Luke 24 is a ...


6

The simplest way to reconcile these passages is to dispute the KJV's translation of βραχύ as "a little." This is, in fact, what most other translations have done, including those that have no interest in internal harmonization. The NET renders Heb 2:7 as follows: Hebrews 2:6–8a (NET) 6 Instead someone testified somewhere: "What is man that ...


6

John Calvin starts by reminding us that Jesus commanded them to begin at Jerusalem (Acts 1:4,8), and says that it makes sense that they would stay there until "being brought into some other place by his hand": But here may a question be asked, forasmuch as they were commanded to preach the gospel throughout the whole world, (Mark 16:16) why they stayed ...


5

John's account of Pilate's questioning of Jesus is more detailed: in Matthew it's given only four verses, 27:11-14, but in John it's given nine verses, 18:33-38, 19:9-11. In both gospels Jesus responds to Pilate's question of whether Jesus is the king of the Jews: Matthew 27:11 and John 18:34-37. And in both gospels Jesus is later silent when Pilate ...


5

This can be reconciled, like many other apparent contradictions by understanding the context of the passages. See Rules behind resolving alleged Biblical discrepancies. ...the vast majority of "contradictions" can be attributed to one of two possible causes. Copyist errors A misunderstanding of the context. (Historical context, cultural ...


3

According the Catholic interpretation of the passages in the O.P.'s question, there is no contradiction between them. To see this, it is helpful to look at the broader context of Hebrews 13:10. Chapter 13 is essentially an exhortation to live Christian charity, and in general living the Christian life, in its various aspects: Let brotherly love ...


3

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of his being freed, are narrated afterwards. Although the gospels do jump forwards and back in time, I take the explicit description of Judas' remorse being ...


3

Each passage was written for its times and its own purpose. The threats of intergenerational accountability (Exodus 20:5, Exodus 34:7, Numbers 14:18, Deuteronomy 5:9) were written to make the Jews really think about the consequences of worshipping other gods - they might not have been worried about their own fate, but what about their children and ...


3

One way to come at this is not to treat it mathematically. When we treat natural language mathematically we are inclined to say none must mean 0% and all must mean 100%. However often when we use natural language there can be exceptions to statements (i.e. an implicit 'some' or other limitation on the statement). Such as when one says, "but everyone is ...


2

Four distinct nations First, it's important to understand that each of the four nations (other than Israel) mentioned here is distinct from the others, though they did have various interrelationships. Here are their origins in the Hebrew Table of Nations, and their territories at the time of the conquest of the Holy Land. It is surprisingly difficult to ...


2

Paul does not forbid women to speak; rather, this is the position held by some Corinthians and it is one of several matters causing division between the believers. After an extended discourse on speaking in tongues [14:33], Paul diverts briefly to another sub-theme [the main theme being division], which has been raised by some Corinthians: the role of women ...


2

1.John's act of ‘Baptism by Water’ was not explicitly prophesied! The prophecy of John was vague and a puzzle to piece. The prophecy of John could not be understood by the scribes and interpreters but only through the Holy Spirit. Luk 1:67 And his father Zechariah was filled with the Holy Spirit and prophesied, saying, 2. Their dress sense does not ...


2

This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


2

Peter was referring to the same laws Jesus condemned in Matt. 23:4, "For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers." All of your quotes were from the OT and referred to the OT laws. Peter and Jesus were talking about the man-made laws added on top of ...


2

The context of Jesus' words are about ritual purity through obeying the Jewish law. Jesus is saying that there are no kinds of food which are intrinsically sinful, and that focusing on the food misses the point of those laws: that it is a person's heart which defiles them. Our obedience to the law shows the state of our hearts, but does not determine them. ...


2

I read your question and it seems as if you are saying that because we are under grace, the law does not matter. I actually used to believe this. That is how people justify what I would call "human or secular" behavior. The person that is under grace (NT) got there because of the law (OT). God gave us a way out of the law, because he knew we could not keep ...


2

If you are asking about condemning as public disapprove of, then of course! Lev 18:22-23 "You shall not lie with a male as one lies with a female; it is an abomination." You may be angry that I quoted an old testament verse but hear me out. Doesn't it say in Malachi 3:6 "For I am the LORD, I do not change." Therefore the Old Testament teaching of ...


1

Gal 5:18 vs John 3:16 Galatians 5:18-21 But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law. Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, Idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, Envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, ...


1

I agree, he is referring to God the Father who resides in heaven, the third heaven to be exact. Consider the following verses in John 14: [7] If you really know me, you will know my Father as well. From now on, you do know him and have seen him.” [8] Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father and that will be enough for us.” [9] Jesus answered: “Don’t you know ...


1

The dominant two-source hypothesis says that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were written independently of each other, using material copied from Mark and the hypothetical 'Q' document. At times, the two evangelists had to supplement the material from Mark and Q with further material from other, unknown sources or by making assumptions about what could have ...


1

Simply put: the public reading offered during Nehemiah’s reforms was from Deuteronomy, not Numbers. Compare the texts below for their several parallels. As the old stories were told in Deuteronomy, the Ammonites – not the Midianites, as in Numbers – collaborated with the Moabites against the ancient Israelites. Nehemiah likely chose the passage from ...


1

The history of these peoples are extremely closely tied together. The first thing that should be noted about the passage that you cite is that it speaks of the land of Midian, and not the Midianite people group. The reason that this is important is that land of Midian was the very same land occupied by the Amorites and Moabites. The 1906 Jewish ...


1

In the New Testament, there is a line of thought concerning reward. In Matthew 5 and 6 the Lord Jesus speaks repeatedly concerning reward (5:12, 46; 6:1-2, 5, 16). In 1 Corinthians 3:8 Paul says, Each will receive his own reward according to his own labor. Then in verse 14 he goes on to say, If anyone's work which he has built upon the foundation ...


1

The answer to your question is actually very simple. In the Bible there are 2 MAIN kinds of the Fear of the Lord. There is an unholy fear of God that makes a person to run away from God and there is a Holy Fear of God that makes a person run to God. Learning to distinguish between a Fear that you must have and a fear that you MUST NOT have is 1 of the ...


1

Classical Apologetics is that style of Christian defence that stresses rational arguments for the existence of God and uses evidence to substantiate biblical claims and miracles. This question does not deal with proving the existence of God, but how apologists deal with claims of biblical inerrancy. In any debate on biblical inerrancy, the apologist knows ...



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