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20

The term "Jew" is an Anglicization of "Judean" which comes from the Greek Ἰουδαῖος (Ioudaios). Technically, it can simply be a regional distinction, that is someone who is from Judea. But it can of course represent one's ethnicity. Greek who happened to grow up in Judea would not have identified himself as a Judean. In the book of Esther, the Hebrew "...


11

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


11

"Jealousy" in colloquial English, means either (1) indignation in response to infidelity, or (2) covetousness of the belongings of others. We can immediately eliminate the second case, because God cannot be covetous; everything is his. (Psalm 50:12) “If I were hungry I would not tell you, for the world is Mine, and all it contains." This jealousy that ...


9

There are two common ways to explain this: The "third year" refers to the third year of Elijah's stay in Zarephath, following a stay of some months at the brook Cherith (Adam Clarke, Barnes, Haydock, Keil and Delitzsch) The "third year" refers to the time of Elijah's exile, which did not begin until the dry period had already been underway for six months (...


8

By the time of the New Testament "Jew" and "Israelite" had effectively become synonyms. This is because the large majority of people who returned from the Exile were from the former Kingdom of Judah. So Acts 21:29 is talking about his nationality, not his tribe.


8

Unlike envy, which is the desire for things you do not rightfully possess, jealousy is the fierce protection of that which is rightfully yours. As such, the premise that jealousy is inherently sinful in your comparison is not accurate. Consider the case of Phinehas: 1 While Israel lived in Shittim, the people began to whore with the daughters of Moab. ...


7

Hard Sayings of the Bible explains this simply: God's jealousy does not involve being suspicious or wrongfully envious of the success of others, or even mistrusting. When used of God, the word jealous refers to that quality of his character that demands exclusive devotion to all that is just, right and fair. Jealousy is the anger that God directs ...


5

John's account of Pilate's questioning of Jesus is more detailed: in Matthew it's given only four verses, 27:11-14, but in John it's given nine verses, 18:33-38, 19:9-11. In both gospels Jesus responds to Pilate's question of whether Jesus is the king of the Jews: Matthew 27:11 and John 18:34-37. And in both gospels Jesus is later silent when Pilate ...


5

This can be reconciled, like many other apparent contradictions by understanding the context of the passages. See Rules behind resolving alleged Biblical discrepancies. ...the vast majority of "contradictions" can be attributed to one of two possible causes. Copyist errors A misunderstanding of the context. (Historical context, cultural ...


4

One of my favorite go-to books on this kind of topic is St. Augustine's De Consensu Evangelistarum, which includes a chapter on the calling of the apostles. The full chapter is worth a read, but here is my breakdown of it as it applies to this specific question. Statement of the Difficulty 37 The question may indeed be raised as to how John gives us ...


3

I'm not sure that there is a contradiction. Using the NIV translation: They said to him, “That would take more than half a year’s wages [200 denarii]! Are we to go and spend that much on bread and give it to them to eat?” — Mark 6:37 Philip answered him, “It would take more than half a year’s wages [200 denarii] to buy enough bread for each one to ...


3

Luke doesn't say Jesus prayed "only once", it records him praying without noting the particular detail of the three separate entreaties recorded in Matthew and Mark (although perhaps it is alluded to non-specifically in verse 44 - "he prayed more earnestly" in context suggests he prayed at least twice): 39 Jesus went out as usual to the Mount of Olives, ...


3

Each passage was written for its times and its own purpose. The threats of intergenerational accountability (Exodus 20:5, Exodus 34:7, Numbers 14:18, Deuteronomy 5:9) were written to make the Jews really think about the consequences of worshipping other gods - they might not have been worried about their own fate, but what about their children and ...


3

In context the scripture reads - Ps. 49:6-9: “Those who are trusting in their means of maintenance, and who keep boasting about the abundance of their riches, not one of them can by any means redeem even a brother, nor give to God a ransom for him; (and the redemption price of their soul is so precious that it has ceased to time indefinite) that he should ...


3

According the Catholic interpretation of the passages in the O.P.'s question, there is no contradiction between them. To see this, it is helpful to look at the broader context of Hebrews 13:10. Chapter 13 is essentially an exhortation to live Christian charity, and in general living the Christian life, in its various aspects: Let brotherly love continue....


3

Matthew 27:3 says that the impetus for Judas' suicide was seeing him be condemned, rather than seeing him being executed or anything else. Jesus' interactions with Pilate, including the possibility of his being freed, are narrated afterwards. Although the gospels do jump forwards and back in time, I take the explicit description of Judas' remorse being ...


3

One way to come at this is not to treat it mathematically. When we treat natural language mathematically we are inclined to say none must mean 0% and all must mean 100%. However often when we use natural language there can be exceptions to statements (i.e. an implicit 'some' or other limitation on the statement). Such as when one says, "but everyone is ...


2

Peter was referring to the same laws Jesus condemned in Matt. 23:4, "For they bind heavy burdens and grievous to be borne, and lay them on men's shoulders; but they themselves will not move them with one of their fingers." All of your quotes were from the OT and referred to the OT laws. Peter and Jesus were talking about the man-made laws added on top of ...


2

The context of Jesus' words are about ritual purity through obeying the Jewish law. Jesus is saying that there are no kinds of food which are intrinsically sinful, and that focusing on the food misses the point of those laws: that it is a person's heart which defiles them. Our obedience to the law shows the state of our hearts, but does not determine them. ...


2

Which tribe did Paul belong to? Some of the confusion is a result from the split in the nation of Israel into two kingdoms after the reign of Solomon. These two kingdoms were called Israel and Judea. What was called the kingdom of Israel had most of ten tribes. Both kingdoms had trouble with the practice of idolatry. Punishment first came on the nation of ...


2

God is constant; man is not. The Psalms are reflections of the hearts of the persons who composed them. David in faith defeated Goliath and in folly slept with a friend's wife and had him killed. He worshiped God wholeheartedly and spared the life of his enemy King Saul, and he also was chased for years and despaired of life. One son became a wise leader, ...


2

When considering the context of the passage you quoted from Hebrews, one will notice that the the passage is given within a broad discussion spanning several chapters. The focus of the discussion is the contrast between the Levitical Priesthood and the priesthood of Christ. This verse in particular points out that the regulation by which authority is ...


1

Should Christians defend their faith? 1 Peter 3:15 But sanctify the Lord God in your hearts: and be ready always to give an answer to every man that asketh you a reason of the hope that is in you with meekness and fear: Mark 13:11 But when they shall lead you, and deliver you up, take no thought beforehand what ye shall speak, neither do ye ...


1

The difference between these verses is the influence of the Holy Ghost. AS a Christian we should always be ready to explain why we believe that Jesus was our redemption from sin. that is the lesson of Peter. Peter was as should all Christians ready to teach the Gospel, and defend our right to live in a way to secure our Eternity. Peter did so right up to his ...


1

Here the skeptic attempts to pit Jeremiah 3:12 (a promise to Israel that God will not be angry with them forever) and Jeremiah 17:4 (a statement that God’s anger over sin had been kindled and will burn forever) against each other. In Jer. 3 God is calling Israel to repent of their sin and turn back to him and promises that his anger will not burn against ...


1

Consider the following passages: Psalm 37:4 "Delight yourself in YHWH, and he will give you the desires of your heart. Deuteronomy 4:29 "But from there [among the world] you will seek YHWH your God, and you will find Him if you search for Him with all your heart and all your life." Jeremiah 29:11-14 "For I know the plans I have for you,” ...


1

There really isn't any contradiction between the two Scriptures, their divergence is simply a small look at God. God is shown in the Old Testament as the God of second chances, and in the New Testament as the God of grace. In the Old Testament what we see is God continuously allowing mankind the opportunity to repent and return to the God of creation; ...


1

Gal 5:18 vs John 3:16 Galatians 5:18-21 But if ye be led of the Spirit, ye are not under the law. Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, Idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, variance, emulations, wrath, strife, seditions, heresies, Envyings, murders, drunkenness, revellings, ...


1

I agree, he is referring to God the Father who resides in heaven, the third heaven to be exact. Consider the following verses in John 14: [7] If you really know me, you will know my Father as well. From now on, you do know him and have seen him.” [8] Philip said, “Lord, show us the Father and that will be enough for us.” [9] Jesus answered: “Don’t you know ...


1

The answer to your question is actually very simple. In the Bible there are 2 MAIN kinds of the Fear of the Lord. There is an unholy fear of God that makes a person to run away from God and there is a Holy Fear of God that makes a person run to God. Learning to distinguish between a Fear that you must have and a fear that you MUST NOT have is 1 of the ...



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