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The phrase is part of a couplet, so it needs to be read in that context. Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. The phrase does not assume that God might lead us into temptation. Instead, it assumes that God does deliver us from evil. The couplet gives the impression that temptations will come, but prays that God delivers us from ...


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John Calvin starts by reminding us that Jesus commanded them to begin at Jerusalem (Acts 1:4,8), and says that it makes sense that they would stay there until "being brought into some other place by his hand": But here may a question be asked, forasmuch as they were commanded to preach the gospel throughout the whole world, (Mark 16:16) why they stayed ...


2

The dominant two-source hypothesis says that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were written independently of each other, using material copied from Mark and the hypothetical 'Q' document. At times, the two evangelists had to supplement the material from Mark and Q with further material from other, unknown sources or by making assumptions about what could have ...


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This may be a simplistic answer, but it came as something of an "aha!" moment to me when I first heard it many years ago: In general, it is probably not the best idea to ask God to do something God doesn't want to do, or to ask God not to do something God does want to do. Presumably God's will and God's knowledge of the situation is better than ours. So if ...


1

Classical Apologetics is that style of Christian defence that stresses rational arguments for the existence of God and uses evidence to substantiate biblical claims and miracles. This question does not deal with proving the existence of God, but how apologists deal with claims of biblical inerrancy. In any debate on biblical inerrancy, the apologist knows ...



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