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36

The context of Matthew is adultery--relations with a woman who is not your wife. The context of Proverbs is marriage--relations with the woman who is your wife. The difference is quite substantial. “You have heard that it was said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ 28 But I say to you that everyone who looks at a woman with lustful intent has already ...


31

Bob's answer about the intended meaning of 'not yet going' is on the right track but it leaves out a couple of important details. There are more than one set of Greek manuscripts and there are actually quite a number of one and two character type differences between them. Usually, these involve punctuation or spelling differences and have no affect on the ...


23

This is a little easier to understand using the KJV translation. Go ye up unto this feast: I go not up yet unto this feast; for my time is not yet full come. He didn't say he wasn't going. He said He wasn't going yet. Also, for comparison, Young's Literal Transation: Ye -- go ye up to this feast; I do not yet go up to this feast, because my ...


18

Those aren't the words written on the second stone tablets. The original tablets were written by the Lord: Exodus 24:12 (ESV) The LORD said to Moses, "Come up to me on the mountain and wait there, that I may give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction." Compare to the passage ...


17

This is a fairly common question, and there is a very good answer. A detailed answer can be found here and here. These are some of the highlights. It is important to note that Luke mentions that the census to which he is referring is the first census taken while Quirinius was governing. This seems to indicate that at the time of writing, the readers ...


16

This is generally explained as two different details of the same event being the emphisis of the record. Both accounts tell of a suicide. One specifically mentions hanging, the other doesn't mention anything about cause of death but does mention his "falling". These can readily be reconciled through natural causes either by something going wrong in the ...


16

What's clear from the account of Jonah is that God would have destroyed the city if it were not for the people's repentance. Jonah's prophecy was accurate in that it articulated what God was going to do, but God relented. There was no failing in Jonah's ability to discern and communicate the will of God prior to the people's repentance, but that remarkable ...


15

It's quite possible that both happened: he hanged himself, and when he was found and cut down, (which might have been some time later, long enough for the decay process to begin,) his body burst open with a predictable display of gore.


15

The Greek text of John 3:13 according to Robert Estienne’s 1550 Textus Receptus states, καὶ οὐδεὶς ἀναβέβηκεν εἰς τὸν οὐρανὸν εἰ μὴ ὁ ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ καταβάς ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ὁ ὤν ἐν τῷ οὐρανῷ which is translated as, And no one ascended into heaven except he who descended out of heaven, the Son of man who is in heaven. There are some who ...


14

It is obvious from the text of John 4:22 that Jesus was not the one actually performing the dipping, but his apostles. The idea here is that the apostles were baptizing on his behalf. Because they were baptizing in his name, it was, in essence, Jesus baptizing. We, today, have the power to do the same thing: Matthew 28:19 (NIV) Therefore go and make ...


14

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


13

In a case like this, it's best to go back to the original Greek. As jrista pointed out, the key verb in 3:9 is the one your version translates as "continue to", in the greek "ποιέω". This Greek Lexicon gives a lot of translations for this verb, including: to make; with the names of things made, to produce, construct, form, fashion, etc.; to be the ...


13

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." Like in Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. in Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. and so this word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put ...


13

First, understanding that this is not a site to learn about Truth, but rather to learn about Christianity - what the various teachings are from an academic perspective, the question "Which is true" is off-topic. However, we could take a couple of approaches that would be within the bounds of the site: Answering what various denominations believe about ...


12

So first off, this story of Jacob "struggling with God" (in Hebrew Isra - el) is one that has puzzled people for years. There is little agreement amongst scholars about what this means. Some interpret this is a vision, others as a theophany, and still others suggest that it was simply a metaphor for the striving and struggling that Jacob had been doing all ...


12

In order to understand the meaning of any text, you must understand it's purpose. If you don't understand why a bit of text was written, you are quite likely to come away with a bad understanding of what it means. In this case your question assumes a mis-understanding of the purpose of the two texts in question. If you correct that understanding, it becomes ...


12

Jesus is talking here about the resurrection of the dead. Because of what Christ did all will live again. So yes you could die for the gospel but you would gain eternal life in Christ. Just adding some scripture to back this up: (KJV) 1 Corinthians 15:42 So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: ...


11

I think part of the difficulty comes as a bit of confusion as to what is meant by the law and its application. When the law was introduced, it was never intended to be the instrument by which man would save himself, but it was the instrument through which man was to be saved. In a very real sense, man is saved through the fulfilment (keeping) of the ...


11

The genealogy in the gospel of Matthew is definitely the genealogy of Joseph, and the genealogy in Luke's Gospel is most likely that of Mary. This coincides with the primary audiences of the two books (Mathew the Jews, and Luke the Gentiles). Mathew would want to show according to Jewish tradition that Jesus was both a Jew and a Son of David. Luke was trying ...


11

The ESV Study Bible includes this note about the purchase of the property in the Acts account: That is, the field was acquired indirectly by Judas, through the agency of the chief priests. As Matt. 27:3–7 records, Judas brought the 30 pieces of silver back to the chief priests and elders. The chief priests then purchased the potter’s field with Judas’s ...


11

If Jesus said He was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, then that is certainly true. If we don't accept Jesus' own words as true, then it would be difficult to imagine what the qualifications for acceptance would be. So, yes, Jesus was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. That does not mean, however, that Jesus, the ...


10

The books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John can be seen to present Christ as King, Servant, Man, and God (in that order). See E.W. Bullinger's wonderful book Number in Scriptures for more on this topic (the chapter on the number seven). As Bullinger puts it, a king must have a genealogy, and a man should have one. You'll notice that Matthew's genealogy starts ...


10

After even more study of Genesis, I think I may understand why the original question may have been asked. Yes, there are 2 different accounts here, but they are of the same creation event. The first part is an account of God creating the universe and everything in it. The second part begins with the creation of Adam (which was mentioned in the first ...


10

The basic rules and assumptions are as follows: That we are defending the notion that the Bible is, indeed, inspired, and therefore inerrant and infallible. It cannot contain errors, and if a true contradiction is found, it is, by definition, an error. Either one is correct and the other is wrong, or they are both wrong. Either way, the Bible is no ...


10

This scripture in Malachi 4:5-6 refers to John the Baptist, not Jesus. Luke 1:17 "And he [John the Baptist] will go on before the Lord, in the spirit and power of Elijah, to turn the hearts of the fathers to their children and the disobedient to the wisdom of the righteous–to make ready a people prepared for the Lord." Matthew 11:14 "And if you are ...


10

From a Trinitarian standpoint there is nothing to reconcile. As with most things, the answer is found in the context. The whole of John 1:18 reads: "No one has seen God at any time; the only begotten God who is in the bosom of the Father, He has explained Him." (NASB) The person John refers to here is the same one Jesus exclaims in John 6:46: "Not that ...


9

Moses asked to see God's glory. That is when God said that no-one can see God's face and live. Surely "God's face" is referring to God's glory: God's essence. Nothing prevents God from speaking through a burning bush, a cloud, or collection of dust (aka a human figure). Abraham talked with God "face to face" when God was about to destroy Sodom and ...


9

So, in the first three cases (the Synoptic Gospels), you have: an angel (or someone dressed in a gleaming white robe) a stone rolled away (And that's just one sentence) In John, you have two angels, yes, but this purports to be the account of a different person. (the Synoptics have the disciples as the antecedent, John explicitly mentions Mary) I ...


9

The Bridgeway Bible Commentary (by Don Fleming, I'm unsure of his denomination or theological lens) tries to harmonise the resurrection accounts in the following way (sorry this is a long quote): Morning of the resurrection (Mt 28:1-15; Mk 16:1-11; Lk 24:1-12; Jn 20:1-18) It is not surprising that there are differences in the accounts of what people ...



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