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25

Bob's answer about the intended meaning of 'not yet going' is on the right track but it leaves out a couple of important details. There are more than one set of Greek manuscripts and there are actually quite a number of one and two character type differences between them. Usually, these involve punctuation or spelling differences and have no affect on the ...


21

This is a little easier to understand using the KJV translation. Go ye up unto this feast: I go not up yet unto this feast; for my time is not yet full come. He didn't say he wasn't going. He said He wasn't going yet. Also, for comparison, Young's Literal Transation: Ye -- go ye up to this feast; I do not yet go up to this feast, because my ...


16

This is generally explained as two different details of the same event being the emphisis of the record. Both accounts tell of a suicide. One specifically mentions hanging, the other doesn't mention anything about cause of death but does mention his "falling". These can readily be reconciled through natural causes either by something going wrong in the ...


16

What's clear from the account of Jonah is that God would have destroyed the city if it were not for the people's repentance. Jonah's prophecy was accurate in that it articulated what God was going to do, but God relented. There was no failing in Jonah's ability to discern and communicate the will of God prior to the people's repentance, but that remarkable ...


15

It's quite possible that both happened: he hanged himself, and when he was found and cut down, (which might have been some time later, long enough for the decay process to begin,) his body burst open with a predictable display of gore.


15

Those aren't the words written on the second stone tablets. The original tablets were written by the Lord: Exodus 24:12 (ESV) The LORD said to Moses, "Come up to me on the mountain and wait there, that I may give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction." Compare to the passage ...


15

This is a fairly common question, and there is a very good answer. A detailed answer can be found here and here. These are some of the highlights. It is important to note that Luke mentions that the census to which he is referring is the first census taken while Quirinius was governing. This seems to indicate that at the time of writing, the readers ...


13

The Bible in no place says that you can possibly pray too much. In fact, it says just the opposite. Not only in the passage in Luke, but also in 1 Thessalonialns 5:17, which says we should be praying continually. Like most "contradictions' this one is simple to resolve by showing that the problem arises from taking verses out of context. (See Rules ...


12

It is obvious from the text of John 4:22 that Jesus was not the one actually performing the dipping, but his apostles. The idea here is that the apostles were baptizing on his behalf. Because they were baptizing in his name, it was, in essence, Jesus baptizing. We, today, have the power to do the same thing: Matthew 28:19 (NIV) Therefore go and make ...


12

In a case like this, it's best to go back to the original Greek. As jrista pointed out, the key verb in 3:9 is the one your version translates as "continue to", in the greek "ποιέω". This Greek Lexicon gives a lot of translations for this verb, including: to make; with the names of things made, to produce, construct, form, fashion, etc.; to be the ...


12

In many languages today there is the equivalent of the English word "acquire." Like in Russian "priobrel" means acquire - in contrast "buy" in Russian would be kupit. in Azerbaijani language for "buy" we use a word "almaq" which has many meanings like buy, take, gain. and so this word acquire in the original Greek does not necessarily mean that someone put ...


12

Jesus is talking here about the resurrection of the dead. Because of what Christ did all will live again. So yes you could die for the gospel but you would gain eternal life in Christ. Just adding some scripture to back this up: (KJV) 1 Corinthians 15:42 So also is the resurrection of the dead. It is sown in corruption; it is raised in incorruption: ...


11

They both did - it just depends on perspective for application of the word "bought". It was Judas' money, and it was the priests who used the money he returned to them to buy the field. They bought the field because they could not accept blood money and return it to the temple treasury. In essence, the priests bought the field on behalf of Judas. This ...


11

So first off, this story of Jacob "struggling with God" (in Hebrew Isra - el) is one that has puzzled people for years. There is little agreement amongst scholars about what this means. Some interpret this is a vision, others as a theophany, and still others suggest that it was simply a metaphor for the striving and struggling that Jacob had been doing all ...


10

The genealogy in the gospel of Matthew is definitely the genealogy of Joseph, and the genealogy in Luke's Gospel is most likely that of Mary. This coincides with the primary audiences of the two books (Mathew the Jews, and Luke the Gentiles). Mathew would want to show according to Jewish tradition that Jesus was both a Jew and a Son of David. Luke was trying ...


10

After even more study of Genesis, I think I may understand why the original question may have been asked. Yes, there are 2 different accounts here, but they are of the same creation event. The first part is an account of God creating the universe and everything in it. The second part begins with the creation of Adam (which was mentioned in the first ...


9

I think part of the difficulty comes as a bit of confusion as to what is meant by the law and its application. When the law was introduced, it was never intended to be the instrument by which man would save himself, but it was the instrument through which man was to be saved. In a very real sense, man is saved through the fulfilment (keeping) of the ...


9

The revelation of scripture which describes God as existing as one being, with three distinct persons, does not hinge on any particular verse, but is gradually revealed from Genesis to Revelation.  If 1 John was removed from the Bible it would have no impact on the concept of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, as three distinct persons of the only God. The ...


8

The books of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John can be seen to present Christ as King, Servant, Man, and God (in that order). See E.W. Bullinger's wonderful book Number in Scriptures for more on this topic (the chapter on the number seven). As Bullinger puts it, a king must have a genealogy, and a man should have one. You'll notice that Matthew's genealogy starts ...


8

The ESV Study Bible includes this note about the purchase of the property in the Acts account: That is, the field was acquired indirectly by Judas, through the agency of the chief priests. As Matt. 27:3–7 records, Judas brought the 30 pieces of silver back to the chief priests and elders. The chief priests then purchased the potter’s field with Judas’s ...


8

This might be a case where detail is lost in translation? According to one of my bibles, the English Standard Version, the verse 1 John 3:9 is this: No one born of God makes a practice of sinning, for God's seed abides in him, and he cannot keep on sinning because he has been born of God. The word practice there seems to give deeper meaning, and as I ...


8

The letters of Paul tell us that the law was given to show us that we do not measure up. It is impossible to live a God pleasing life by works. So failing was an expected part of the laws. So things would exist that were humane, and God gave guidelines on how to go about all this. Even more, we live in a fallen world, and God gives us means to survive in a ...


8

Moses asked to see God's glory. That is when God said that no-one can see God's face and live. Surely "God's face" is referring to God's glory: God's essence. Nothing prevents God from speaking through a burning bush, a cloud, or collection of dust (aka a human figure). Abraham talked with God "face to face" when God was about to destroy Sodom and ...


8

The focus of this invective isn't so much on the genealogies themselves as it is the way in which people use them to puff them themselves up. Even barring earthly lineages, the poor of the church of Corinth managed to put themselves into faction. In 1 Corinthians 3, Paul writes: Brothers and sisters, I could not address you as people who live by the ...


7

No contradiction at all. We are, indeed, commanded to love our neighbors. We are also told that homosexuality is a sin. How is there any contradiction in that? Loving our neighbors does not require us to approve of everything they do. Lying, stealing, adultery, profanity and greed are also defined as sins in the Bible. If loving our neighbor demands we ...


7

The answer to the question is obvious; asking it is rhetorical: of course the owner will seek retribution for the wrong done to him and his son by those he trusted. The purpose of the story - regardless of who fills in this answer - is made clear by the quote from Psalms that follows, and so it is explained (Matt, Mark) that his audience sees immediately ...


6

There is no contradiction with homosexuality. To be homosexual is to pervert the things that God has made for Good and to do wicked with them. To love God is to obey his commandments. Notice the order of importance in the commandments. Matthew 22:35-39 (NIV) 35 One of them, an expert in the law, tested him with this question: 36 “Teacher, which is ...


6

Such "contradictions" are often alleged. In order to really understand them you should take them one at a time. You can see how a few of these have been approached in the contradiction tag. Sometimes these take the form of textual issues such as: How did Judas die? Who bought the Field of Blood, Judas or the Priests? 1 John Chapter 1 & 3 - Is there an ...


6

There have been egregious applications of slavery throughout history which have dehumanized people (often through racist justification) by arbitrarily deeming them property of another person. From my understanding, slavery in OT Jerusalem was not like that. It wasn't ethnically-based (Jews were often slaves of Jews), and it was temporary. It was more of ...



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