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He discusses the tetragrammaton at several places in the grammar.1 In §102m he includes the vowel pointing patach-šĕwă-sĕgōl that leads to our English “Yahweh”. That is: יַהְוֶה‎. Elsewhere throughout the grammar he either uses the unpointed יהוה or the Masoretic יְהוָֹה (šĕwă'-ḥōlem-qāmeṣ; that is, the vowels of אֲדֹנָי ʾădōnāy 2). The relationship between ...


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Modern Hebrew uses a 'V' sound and the letter is called vav. In early, biblical Hebrew, it appears that the same letter was pronounced 'W'. To avoid confusion, many (but not all) linguists refer to the letter as waw when used in biblical Hebrew. So, YHVH and YHWH are both correct, but YHWH is generally preferred for biblical references. It did have a ...


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According to the Exodus Bible Introductions by John MacArthur, Exodus was written in the 15th century B.C. http://www.gty.org/resources/bible-introductions/MSB02/Exodus . Also the archeological records support this according to https://bible.org/article/introduction-book-exodus According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy ...


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I couldn't find anywhere that any KJV translators spoke about their decision to translate the Tetragrammaton as "Lord." Not the preface, not the marginal notes, and I couldn't find any quotes from any of them on it (I wasn't too thorough in my search on the last one, so they could be out there somewhere). The KJV draws significantly from Tyndale's earlier ...


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@"Seeking First": Awesome Awesome Awesome!! Exactly right on, Yeshusa is in the Father and the Father is in Yeshua. He was both man and divine. When they approached Him, He asked, "Whom do you seek?" They responded, "Yeshua of Nazareth." Meaning YH SAVES, they didn't understand they were calling on the name of God Himself. Yeshua was very accurate in His ...



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