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21

There's a problem with one of your assumptions: Jehovah's Witnesses don't use Jehovah "to be accurate". They use Jehovah because they think it's important to call God by name, and because Jehovah is the traditional rendering in English. They accept that the original pronunciation has been lost, and argue that were it important, Jehovah God would not have ...


10

When a word isn't spoken, all you have to go by is its written representation. Unfortunately, the written representation is incomplete, as ancient Hebrews only wrote consonants. You were supposed to be able to infer the rest of the word from context, and you'd be familiar with them because you used most of them in day to day speech. Oops! Since the name ...


9

The fact is the very exact, original pronunciation or vocalization of God's name is lost. But the original name is not. You see, each language have have their own translation of the name 'Jesus' but 'Jesus' is neither the original vocalization of Jesus' name, its not the way they described it in Hebrew or in Greek way back then, yet we "accept" the name ...


9

The word Jehovah is a Latin version of the Tetragrammaton, usually considered the Hebrew name of God. Most scholars consider Jehovah "a hybrid form derived by combining the Latin letters JHVH with the vowels of Adonai", and not to have been used before 1100AD. Obviously Jesus would not have used a word invented 1100 years after his earthly life. It is ...


8

Why the Heavenly Father's name is pronounced, "Yahweh" supports "Yahweh" as the correct name. What about Jehovah? has reasons why "Jehovah" is incorrect. Hebrew doesn't have a J sound. Masoretes replaced vowels. Names have Yah and not Jeh. Hovah means ruin and mischief. Here's a quote. Some Christians, especially Jehovah's witnesses, use this name ...


6

In Jewish tradition, speaking the name was forbidden because it was so holy that people didn't dare speak it. This has been the case for centuries. In essence, the idea has two aspects. First, it was a sign of respect, and reverence for the word, that it should not pass through unclean lips. Second, it was a fear of accidentally taking the Lord's name ...


6

Actually, Jesus broke taboos quite frequently. However, when Jesus broke a taboo, the taboo was wrong--not Jesus. Some of the other taboos Jesus broke include the following: Breaking the Sabbath So, because Jesus was doing these things on the Sabbath, the Jewish leaders began to persecute him. (John 5:16 NIV) Claiming Equality with God For ...


6

If Jehovah were an exclusive name for God the Father, then it would be appropriate for Jesus to have used that name, along with a myriad of other names (Jehova-Jireh, El Shaddai, etc.). However, if the name "Jehovah" applied to the Trinity, then it would seem odd for Jesus to refer to the Father with a term that also referred to Himself as part of the ...


5

Jesus seems to have followed, out of courtesy, the taboo by the Rabbis on pronouncing the Lords name (יהוה‎) Yahweh as though there was something sacred about it. This was not the original practice of the Hebrews but a ban on pronouncing the name started to appear around the time of Antiochus IV (175 BC). Simply from the fact that the New Testament never ...


4

When I first saw how Jesus referred to Himself as "I AM" in John 8:58, that really got me! I remembered how, in the Old Testament, when Moses asked God for his name (Exodus 3:14), He replied, "I AM THAT I AM". WOW!! So many people, both Christians and non-Christians alike, have said that Jesus never claimed to be God - oh, yes He did, and I think there ...


3

The name of God was revealed to Moses in Exodus 3. To wit: 13 Then Moses said to God, “If I come to the people of Israel and say to them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’ what shall I say to them?” 14 God said to Moses, “I am who I am.” And he said, “Say this to the people of Israel, ‘I am has sent me to ...


3

Actually he did use it. in Luke 4:17-19 in the 19th verse the name Jehovah is used. Jesus most definitely used his fathers name while reading aloud the scroll, contrary from the scribes and pharisees who he called "offspring of vipers". and in fact while there are countless titles for God. The bible teaches that he has a personal name. Yes a personal name. ...


3

As far as I know at the time of Jesus there was no actual legal prohibition on pronouncing the name of God. The biblical prohibition is against using the name of God in vain. That was later translated into the practice of never using the name at all largely so that you could be sure of never using it unworthily. Even if found guilty of speaking a taboo ...


2

You may want to read this article. Basically we shouldn't pronounce the name of God, but there is more in the answers in the link. I may add more later, but I need to head to work.


2

Since Jesus was the Father's Son, it's not likely he would refer to Him by the Tetragrammaton יהוה. I don't call my father by his first name, because it's considered disrespectful. Even then, children would call their father and mother as אבא and אמא, respectfully. Since the NT comes to us in Greek, we can't really say for sure that Jesus did not sometimes ...


2

When the monks translated the King James version, They considered the name of God(yehôvâh) to be so Holy that they would not translate יהוה to the word yehôvâh, instead they inserted LORD in it's place. They used all capitol letters as a form of honoring the Deity. Later translations which bore heavily on the King James translation also used that ...


1

According to the Exodus Bible Introductions by John MacArthur, Exodus was written in the 15th century B.C. http://www.gty.org/resources/bible-introductions/MSB02/Exodus . Also the archeological records support this according to https://bible.org/article/introduction-book-exodus According to the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy ...


1

In Aramaic, Jesus Christ addresses God as MarYA. In Aramaic Peshitta (Aramaic NT), you will see Jesus Christ saying MarYA several times. "YA" (Yodh Alap) is Aramaic form of Hebrew "YH" in "YHWH." MarYA means "Master YA" in English. Aramaic was the spoken language of first century Israel. So they used MarYA to address God. So the names will also get changed ...


1

Taboo? He is meant to break them. That is the law. He is an example for us as written in Romans 8: There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit. He is the one that condemns. No one can condemn him. As Romans said, no one can lay any charge against the elect of God. As ...


1

Something to point out here is that most likely Jesus did not speak Hebrew in everyday conversation, he most likely spoke Aramaic (see this question), so saying I AM here (in Aramaic) would not have been the same Hebrew YHWH (the tetragrammaton) that was in the Torah.


1

Its the same reason why Jehovah's Witnesses use Jehovah which is not Hebrew or Greek. What matter most is that you are using the accepted equivalent translation in your own language or dialect to pertain to God or to his son, Jesus, and you are not constraint of using their names because of their original pronunciation is lost through time.


1

This is my understanding from studying with a JW who visited my home and became a weekly visitor over the course of several months. (I am not JW, but am not opposed to study.) During the course of this study, I was informed that they (JW) do not believe in the trinity. They are not concerned with honoring Jesus in the same way that God should be honored. ...



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