New answers tagged

5

The tulip acronym stands for the following: Total depravity, the idea that man can do only evil without God. Unconditional election, the idea that the saved are chosen by God without any consideration for their actions. Limited atonement, the idea that Christ's death atones only for the sins of the elected saved. Irresistible grace, the idea that no one ...


3

The "early church" is indeed an imprecise term, but academically a loose consensus exists. A survey of books and college courses indicates that the end point of the "early church" is most often identified during the fifth or sixth centuries. Here's a breakdown: End of 5th century. Some authors expliticly or implictly include the entire fifth century. ...


0

There is no reference within the Old and New Testaments per se of an "Old Testament" or a "New Testament" section of the Bible. In the Latin translation of Against Heresies, written sometime between 175 and 185 AD, Irenaeus uses the phrase "Scripturae veteris Testamenti". The Latin word "testamentum" is derived from the Latin verb "testari", meaning to ...


0

The Greek word "diatheke", according to Hebrews 9:15-17 means: "the will of the dying father for his children". In this "will" the father pledges to transfer his property to his children after he dies. For the will/the pledge to take an effect, it implies the death of the father. Thus, the Christians receive God's will/pledge/promise (the eternal salvation)...


1

The King James editors were translating the Greek literally. The Greek phrase in question in Romans 3:22 is: διὰ πίστεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ where the words "Jesus Christ" (Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ) are in the genitive, or "possessive" case. This is a Greek idiom. Whereas we use the preposition "in" to signify faith in something, Greek sometimes simply signifies ...



Top 50 recent answers are included