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The latter (the broad) definition is wrong because it results in a heterogeneous set of groups that have nothing in common, and majority of them having no connection to the Reformation. Historically, Protestantism and the Reformation cannot be separated. For a reasonable definition we must examine what is common to Protestants, and how much of that is ...


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Your question is a good one, but it is slightly misguided. You are seeking a precise definition for a term which does not have one. The word Protestant can mean different things depending on the context in which it is used. When used in a historical context, it may be used to strictly refer to those involved in the Reformation and to the churches that ...


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The first three gospels (Matthew, Mark and Luke) are sometimes known as the "synoptic" gospels because by laying them in parallel and reading them synoptically ('with the same eye') in the original Greek language, it can readily be seen that there is a literary relationship among them. Scholars have established that Matthew and Luke were substantially ...


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I can provide a excerpt from the first dead link that may be of help: "Montgomery argues that in its approach to language, the natural sciences manifest a monological discursive strategy.[18] The so-called human sciences reflect a dialogical approach to language, since they necessarily converse with other discourses. But the natural sciences pursue a ...


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The Catholic understanding is that the word πρεσβύτερος means priest subordinate to a hierarch, one ordained to offer sacrifice under the direction of a chief priest. It does not mean layman governor of the church, like a Protestant elder. This is consistent with NT usage, where "chief priests and elders=πρεσβύτερος" (Matt 21:23 KJV) refers to two levels of ...



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