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54

This misinterpretation is due to a language shift since the days of King James, when that version of the Ten Commandments was set forth. The term "kill" back then meant what "murder" means today, and I think that everyone would agree that that's a good thing to prohibit in strong, absolute terms. If you look through the King James Version of the Bible, you ...


43

According to the definition of "in vain", I'd say yes, it is in vain. in vain, a. without effect or avail; to no purpose: to apologize in vain. b. in an improper or irreverent manner: to take God's name in vain. While it may not be directly insulting or condemning God in any way, I would say that "Oh my God" is not using his name in a reverent ...


38

In addition to a_hardin's analysis, it's important to consider the original meaning of the commandment. To take God's name didn't mean swearing (profanity), it meant swearing an oath in the name of the Lord. Swearing falsely was an extremely serious matter and continues to be one today in Semitic cultures, but to swear falsely (in vain) in the name of God ...


28

Note: This answer comes from the perspective of the Old Testament alone, since the question was in regard to the Ten Commandments and gives no indication that it's seeking a "Christian" perspective, but does give indication that it's seeking a historical perspective (since it references the Ten Commandments). History of the ten Commandments Why is rape not ...


27

Not every sinful act is spelled out in the ten commandments, but every possible sinful act does fall under one or more of the umbrellas. Rape is adultery as well as theft and envy and does not honor the Lord. That's at least four "counts". How much does one need to know that it's wrong? In the NT we find the ten commandments expounded to include thoughts ...


22

Honor your parents? Yes absolutely. Sin? No never. What is trump? Don't sin! However it should be noted that the trump card will never need to be used because on closer inspection these two things are never actually in conflict. If your parents ask you to murder your neighbor (clearly sin) it would be no honor to them if you obeyed. The same principle can ...


17

Those aren't the words written on the second stone tablets. The original tablets were written by the Lord: Exodus 24:12 (ESV) The LORD said to Moses, "Come up to me on the mountain and wait there, that I may give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction." Compare to the passage ...


13

The better question may be "What is it that God is jealous of?" He is righteously jealous of the devotion and affections of His people. This is mirrored in our own lives as a married individual is righteously jealous for the affections and devotion of his or her spouse. Furthermore, a father or mother is righteously jealous for the affections of their ...


11

There are two ways to approach that commandment. Either it is absolute or it is relative: it can either refer to all of human life, or some subset of human life. Clearly it cannot be the former as the Torah also allows for the death penalty (before anyone tries to argue, "but Christ says..." or "but the woman caught in adultery..." I will counter that the ...


11

A successful marriage relationship will need a full measure of agape love. Here's how Paul defines it with particularly relevant words bolded: Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the ...


11

Oftentimes, the simplest answer is the correct one. So here's the obvious answer: He spoke and wrote in Hebrew because he was dealing with Hebrew-speaking people at the moment. Had God spoken to them in English, Latin, or Chinese, they would not have understood him! God, being omniscient, knows all human languages. This means that he has no trouble ...


9

I think some of the more telling things about our understanding of the Sabbath should be what Jesus said about the subject, and more importantly what Jesus did on the Sabbath. Jesus healed on the Sabbath several times Matt 12:9-14 (NIV) 9 Going on from that place, he went into their synagogue, 10 and a man with a shriveled hand was there. Looking for a ...


9

Just as a small counter-argument to the obvious answer, remember that Jesus said the entire law was summed up as this: 30 Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind and with all your strength.’ 31 The second is this: ‘Love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no commandment greater than these.” The ...


9

The English phrase "Ten Commandments" is a bit of a misnomer. The Hebrew phrase עֲשֶׂרֶת הַדְּבָרִים (eseret ha-dvarim) literally translates into English as "the ten words" or "the ten statements." The Hebrew phrase is translated into the LXX as δέκα λόγους (deka logous). Of course, from thence is derived the English expression "dekalogue" --- which is ...


8

It should be noted that "honor" is not the same as obey. Children are instructed to obey their parents, and all of us are commanded to honor them. Now, I don't believe children should obey their parents by sinning either, but that's a separate question. One would wonder how it's possible for the honoring of one's parents to ever necessitate sin? We can ...


8

I was just studying this. If you read more about this very topic you'll find that God is talking about shedding innocent blood. Have a look at what God did here: Judges 3:1-2 (New International Version) 1 These are the nations the LORD left to test all those Israelites who had not experienced any of the wars in Canaan 2 (he did this only to teach ...


8

The reason why different groups view the Ten Commandments differently is because each group assumes different priorities from the text. Some of the commandments are long because they include a justification or explanation, so it's natural to shorten those to a single phrase when compiling the list. It is these expanded commandments that leave room for ...


8

"Aren't idols covered in the first commandment?" Yes and no. The thing is, our use of the English word 'idol' is broad enough that there can be two kinds of idolatry: one, worshipping any god that isn't our own, which the first commandment prohibits, and two, worshipping a man-made image (or "graven image") of any deity, which the second commandment ...


8

When the Lord finished speaking to Moses on Mount Sinai, he gave him the two tablets of the covenant law, the tablets of stone inscribed by the finger of God. (Exodus 31:18, NIV) According to Keil there was only 172 words (the decalogue) in Exodus 20:2–17 that were written on the stones by the 'finger of God'. This would have easily fit. Nothing is ...


8

Let there be no mistake: illegal downloading is not stealing. It is infringement, which is something that can be superficially similar when done in certain ways (like downloading), but in the end is not quite the same. Calling illegal downloading "theft" and leaving it there is wrong and distorts the issue. However, it is also not correct to say that there ...


8

This question is about authority. It is wrong for you to discipline children unless you are their parent, or their teacher, or their sports coach etc. The relationship you have determines what authority you have over someone. As our creator, God has complete authority over everyone. It is entirely right for him to kill any creature he made at any time for ...


7

Sin as a condition is separation from God. A sin as an action is an action that brings about such separation from God; such an action "misses the mark," which is the Greek word for the act of sinning. This is the general---very general---rule of thumb. The trick is to tell what separates us from God. A good rubric, for those who already know in their heart ...


7

I was just reading this EWTN article on the 10 commandments in connection with another post on this site, but it's appropriate here too. And I won't attempt to justify my Church beyond what the Catechism says: 2131 Basing itself on the mystery of the incarnate Word, the seventh ecumenical council at Nicaea justified against the iconoclasts the ...


7

The First Commandment covers who to worship, but the Second Commandment covers how. Often when the Israelites worshiped idols they were actually trying to worship Yahweh[citation needed] and were going about it all wrong. In the Second Commandment, God was giving a clear explanation on what kind of worship was acceptable, and idolatrous worship was out. ...


6

I don't see the problem here. The honest answer to "Does this dress make me look fat?" is never yes. Tell her "No, It's being fat that makes you look fat." Tell the truth. Then be prepared to outrun her. In all seriousness, however, my wife would prefer that I tell her when something isn't flattering because she'd rather have me tell her in private ...


6

In the story of the Rich Young Ruler, Jesus asks the man what commandments he has kept from his youth. He responds with the complete "second table" - i.e. those command which represent man's duty to man, rather than his duty to God - minus one. The young man admits that he hadn't lied, killed, stolen, committed adultery, and honored his parents - but ...


6

There are several historical hints to the location of the Ark. Many of them are contradictory. The problem isn't so much finding historical evidence that points to possible current locations of the Ark, it's that we have no way of determining which, if any, are valid, true, and reliable. For example, ChristianAnswers.Net gives several possible locations. ...


6

From a Baptistic perspective, there is very little difference between the 10 commandments and the other 603 rules and regulations of the Torah. Note: I'm specifically not addressing the extent to which the law of Moses still applies, as it is well covered elsewhere While the 10 commandments are a succinct guide to right behavior, their popularity really ...


5

Sources: Moshe ben Maimon, Sefer ha-Mitzvot, §62 The 62nd prohibition is that we are forbidden to swear a shvu'at shav (a vain oath). The source of this commandment is God's statement (Exo. 20:7), "Do not take the name of YHVH your God in vain." המצווה הס"ב האזהרה שהזהרנו על שבועת שוא והוא אמרו יתעלה : " לא תשא את שם ה ' אלהיך לשוא." (שמות כ, ...


5

Mark 2:27 NIV Then he [Jesus] said to them, “The Sabbath was made for man, not man for the Sabbath. The new Testament does not specify that there is anything we , as Christians, should do/not do on the Sabbath. The Sabbath was made for us to rest. In Genesis it says that God rested on the seventh day, we should likewise also take a day to rest.



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