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16

This question was answered directly by Gordon B. Hinckley, who was the most recent president of the church before the current one. In an article in 2005, he wrote: Following the renovation of the Mesa Arizona Temple some years ago, clergy of other religions were invited to tour it on the first day of the open house period. Hundreds responded. In ...


15

The symbol has no specific meaning within LDS theology, and there are no teachings regarding it. According to an article found among the Wikipedia page's sources, the pentagram symbol actually has a long history in Christian and Jewish art and architecture, and only first began to be associated with Satanism and the occult in the 1850s. By this point, the ...


15

I can't answer the question in the way you're asking it, but I can 'disarm' numerology for you. When you encounter something, like say, a set of best practices in an activity, the number of units you decide to divide the information into determines the symbolic meaning you are essentially attaching to the set. This is possible with pretty much everything, so ...


13

There is a pretty clear distinction between Catholics and Protestants in that regard, though there may be Protestant denominations that do use the crucifix rather than the cross. It seems that the main issue that Protestants today have with the crucifix is that it is specifically an image of Jesus, the Son of God. Such an image is believed to be strictly ...


11

According to John 19:19-20, And Pilate wrote a title, and put [it] on the cross. And the writing was, JESUS OF NAZARETH THE KING OF THE JEWS. This title then read many of the Jews: for the place where Jesus was crucified was nigh to the city: and it was written in Hebrew, [and] Greek, [and] Latin The phrase "Jesus the Nazarene, the king of the ...


10

The "double" cross is known as a Patriarchal cross and is well described in the Wikipedia article. There's no point in reproducing more than a sample here: The Patriarchal cross is a variant of the Christian cross, the religious symbol of Christianity. Similar to the familiar Latin cross, the Patriarchal cross possesses a smaller crossbar placed above ...


9

I don't think there's any harm in making the sign of the cross. I don't think we could equate it with the type of superstition that equates to idolatry or occultism. (I'm sorry if that sounds offensive to anyone who practices it. Please read on, and you'll see I don't mean to offend.) It's definitely meant as a Christian gesture for the Catholics and the ...


8

From True to the Faith: The cross is used in many Christian churches as a symbol of the Savior’s death and Resurrection and as a sincere expression of faith. As members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, we also remember with reverence the suffering of the Savior. But because the Savior lives, we do not use the symbol of His death as the ...


8

Contrary to conventional wisdom, the Mormon disdain for the symbol was more of a late development in Church history, emerging at the grass roots around the turn of the 20th century, and was institutionalized in the 1950′s under the direction of President David O. McKay, on grounds that it was a catholic symbol. Prior to this time, many Latter-day Saints ...


8

The "Christian Flag" was conceived by Charles Overton, who in 1897 was superintendent of the Congregational Sunday School at Brighton Chapel, Coney Island, New York, USA.1 (That community was incorporated as St Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church of Coney Island in 1907, and it still exists today). On 26 September of that year, he gave a sermon musing about ...


8

One can find a reference to the peacock in the book of Revelation 4:6: Before the throne there was a sea of glass, like crystal. And in the midst of the throne, and around the throne, were four living creatures full of eyes in front and in back. "Full of eyes"... "The tail of the peacock, with its ‘thousand eyes’ are symbolic of omnipotence and often ...


7

According to Wikipedia, the Catholics use the Crucifix because: Roman Catholic (Eastern and Western Rite Catholics), Eastern Orthodox, Coptic and other Oriental Orthodox, Anglican and Lutheran Christians generally use the crucifix in public religious services. They believe the crucifix is in keeping with Scripture, which states that “we preach ...


7

The usages you give here are varied and not necessarily related. In today's English would could use the word hand as in to 'offer a helping hand' or to 'hand something over' or 'hand something out' or any number of other expressions. In the same way not every instance of the word 'thigh' necessarily refers to the same thing. The first two cases you give in ...


7

The fish or "Ikthyus" is Greek, is a very ancient symbol. In addition to the obvious parallels with Jesus commissioning the disciples as "fishers of men," there was another reason for using the fish. The phrase - Jesus Christ God('s) Son Savior is in Greek Ίησοῦς Χριστός, Θεοῦ Υἱός, Σωτήρ ΊΧΘΥΣ (the first letter of each word, pronounced 'Ikthyus') ...


6

The symbolism actually comes almost entirely from Brigham Young's fascination with one simple verse in the Book of Mormon. Ether 2:3 And they did also carry with them deseret, which, by interpretation, is a honey bee; and thus they did carry with them swarms of bees, and all manner of that which was upon the face of the land, seeds of every kind. ...


6

Yes, this is one of many allegorical meanings attributed to the unicorn. Sometimes it seems that just about every possible meaning is attached to every possible creature, in the medieval mind. The unicorn's main associations are: power, as with any horned creature. purity: the horn was believed to have the power to magically purify water, counteract ...


6

The first official stage of the religious life is the noviciate. Novices are not admitted to vows until they have successfully completed the prescribed period of training and proving, called the novitiate. This usually lasts one year. This is the period that the member of a religious community undergoes prior to taking vows (poverty, chastity and obedience) ...


6

I believe these are symbols of martyred apostles. Key: Peter Sword: Paul Axe: Possibly Matthew Trident: Thomas Jacob Prahlow has collected some research. Although an upside-down cross is associated with Peter, he was given the keys of the kingdom (Cf. Matthew 16:19) and the key is a very common symbol. Paul, a Roman citizen, was executed by ...


5

Based on my personal experience as a lifelong Roman Catholic, I offer the following brief insight. First, the sign of the cross is just the that: the sign of the CROSS, the cross upon which Christ's blood was spilled in atonement for our sins and to redeem us. That's powerful in and of itself. Second, in a Catholic mass, when the sign of the cross is ...


5

Narnian has a great explanation of one part of it (no graven images). The other is that Jesus' glory is displayed not only in the cross, or Jesus hanging from it, but also in the empty tomb. While it is incredibly significant that Jesus died for our sins, what makes this sacrifice worthwhile is that in so doing he defeated death, and rose again. In this way, ...


5

The short answer is yes, oil was expensive. It was used in ceremonies both because it was often perfumed to have a pleasing aroma and because the financial sacrifice was an act of humility. You mentioned several good examples, but I figured I would offer you one more: Elisha providing for a widow (2 Kings 4:1-7). In this scenario, Elisha is able to provide ...


5

The symbol is a coat of arms, probably from Catholicism, Anglicanism, or perhaps, but less likely, Orthodoxy. The mitre indicates that it was used by a Bishop, but not a Pope, as a Pope's coat of arms would include keys. The coat of arms of the British Bishop, Thomas Burns contains similarities: the mitre on the top, the two devices from the mitre down the ...


4

The word means "fish" in Greek. The symbol of the fish was often used in the early church to distinguish believers from unbelievers where persecution was an issue. When meeting another person, one Christian would draw one arc, and if the other person completed the drawing of the fish by adding another arc, then the Christian would know that he or she was ...


4

Before the 4th. cent. the name of the Lord, and of God were considered to be too sacred to be written down anywhere. So these names do not appear in the early Bibles. Instead "nomina sacra" were written. Whenever The Master was referenced in the Gospel it was usually written as IC with a bar over it to identify it as a metaphor. When the Gospel was read to ...


4

ΙΧΘΥΣ means fish in an old form of Greek. It now primarily refers to a particular Christian fish symbol. From Wikipedia: Ichthys (also Ichthus or Ikhthus /ˈɪkθəs/), from the Koine Greek word for fish: ἰχθύς, (capitalized ΙΧΘΥΣ or ΙΧΘΥϹ) is a symbol consisting of two intersecting arcs, the ends of the right side extending beyond the meeting point so as to ...


4

I mirror Matt's sentiments in that I won't be discussing any specific symbols or rituals that are administered in the temple; they are quite sacred to me, and excessive public discussion on their nature cheapens them in my opinion. I don't mean to offend you if this is an honest inquiry, it's just how I feel on the matter. However, I can speak somewhat on ...


4

I have no problem discussing this, because the promises made in a temple to not reveal certain things do not involve the Garment. The language used in the Temple to explain the marks is this: [The mark of the square] is placed in the garment over the right breast, suggesting to the mind exactness and honor in keeping the covenants entered into this day. ...


3

Nickecarlo touched on the answer: We (Catholics) preach Christ Crucified. Consider our need for Christ: since the fall of Adam and Even, heaven is closed to us. Absolutely nothing we can do as human can make up for the infinite offense of the Original Sin. But God promised a Redeemer. To repair an infinite offense requires an infinitely valuable sacrifice, ...


3

If you will indulge me in a section of "The Great Divorce," by C.S. Lewis. In chapter 3, a deceased bishop (the "Ghost") who is in hell but does not understand that he is, insists on arguing with a friend of his (the "Spirit") - a "Solid" person who wants to bring him to God. Unfortunately, the poor bishop is so wrapped up in his own theology, that he is ...


3

Since we speak at least one common language, perhaps this illustration will shed some light on what Catholics gain by Marian consecration. Encapsulation Mary is not the head of the Catholic Church, she is however, the superclass from which all Christians descend. In my Marian consecration, each day I promise to devote all my prayers, actions and ...



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