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35

This is called the problem of theodicy. The assumptions usually made in the problem statement are, with a little variance: God is almighty and all-knowing God does not want evil in the world God is good The problem goes on to state the fact that there is evil in the world, and claims a contradiction between the assumptions and this observation. I see ...


19

From the perspective of a non-Christian, the explanation you put forth makes no sense. It relies on a number of assumptions that a non-Christian doesn't necessarily hold. Regardless of whether it makes sense in the context of your belief system, it does not make sense to a non-Christian. For example: If evil is the result of the actions of Adam and Eve, ...


13

On the surface, Christ's suffering may not appear necessarily unique in respect to the levels or duration of either physical or emotional pain, but it was certainly unique in respect to the nature of the sufferer and the spiritual dimension of the suffering: The completely innocent Incarnate Creator suffering at the hands of his rebellious creation; and the ...


9

Short answer: The reason is, that Jesus' suffered and died in our place. This is how the bible puts it in Romans 5:6-8 ESV: 6 For while we were still weak, at the right time Christ died for the ungodly. 7 For one will scarcely die for a righteous person—though perhaps for a good person one would dare even to die— 8 but God shows his love for us in ...


8

I think you have a good reason for why evil exists, but I would follow that with suffering exists because evil exists. I don't agree that all suffering is punishment from God. He may allow for suffering, because He can use it in our lives to make us perfect. Another root reason is that God allows for our free will. He does not want us to be robot ...


7

In Isa 53, the word you are translating "illnesses" is more often translated as "transgressions" or "iniquities." Both of those words highlight the fact that Jesus took our sins with him on the cross, and by the wounds he suffered, we were healed - from the iniquity of sin. The basic idea of salvation in Christainity is often summarized as this - We are ...


7

Because God gave us free will. He is not interested in puppets on a string who just hop to his commands. He is interested in followers who of their own free will accept the knowledge of God. Free will cannot (Without being internally coherent) exist and the choice to do evil not. So it looks like God could either have created a puppet humanity with no ...


6

There are two basic approaches: 1. Blame Mankind Evil and suffering exist because of mankind's disobedience to God. Exactly how this works is more difficult to comprehend. Certainly a lot of suffering is the direct result of man's actions, but other types of suffering - things like natural disasters - can't be justified quite so easily. They may be ...


6

Yes... A majority of Christian traditions recognize on some level that we will and even must suffer. The author and perfecter of our faith was hung on a tree. As his followers, we can expect pretty much more of the same. 1 Peter 4:12-14 (ESV) 12  Beloved, do not be surprised at the fiery trial when it comes upon you to test you, as though ...


6

You're looking at the question from a mortal perspective, whereas God has an eternal perspective. He put us here not to be here as an end unto itself, but to prepare us for what comes after this life. In the Sermon on the Mount, we are commanded to be perfect "even as your Father in Heaven is perfect." God is perfect because he never uses his power to do ...


5

If the Christian god is omnipotent, omniscient and omnibenevolent then suffering must be the will of the Christian god and that god, must feel the suffering is somehow good for you. This can be seen if you have ever been to the Dentist, Doctor, or washed out a wound with soap or antiseptic: the pain your are suffering is actually a side effect of something ...


5

Deriving some formula on your own then trying to figure out whether it "fits" somehow is a dangerous way to live your life. You'll get yourself into all sorts of scrapes of your own making and miss out on most of the blessings God has in store. Instead, you should learn to use Scripture as a sort of lens or framework by which to understand the world. If you ...


5

I believe this is one of the most challenging questions to answer because it's so painful to see such terrible suffering in the world that occurs especially when it's at no fault of the suffering soul. Therefore, this question requires a sincere answer in response to the emotions it invokes as well as the possible contradiction posed by Epicurus. In ...


5

In my understanding there are different kinds of evil. A Christian needs to be able to discern between the different evils that are in this world. God knew that men would be evil, this is probably the reason why He created a realm just for man to reside within because God was probably not willing to let us defile the heavens. God disciplining His children. ...


5

You're thinking too hard, and not quite straight. Obviously Jesus didn't not experience everything. Your example is pretty convoluted but lets do an easier one. As a sinless man, there is at least one emotion Jesus didn't experience: a guilty conscience. God "made him to be sin who knew no sin", so he experienced in some fashion what it was like to be ...


5

Having buried my mother last week after seeing her go through progressively worse interventions due to complications from her pneumonia, I can only say that I wish more people would ask this question. Any Christianity that ignores the question of suffering neither addresses the reality of the Sin nor the biblical witness. The question of suffering is ...


5

Any time you hear anything along the lines of "I'm trying to be a Christian", a giant red flag should immediately go up in your mind. Whoever said that is either playing fast and loose with words or they have completely missed the point. Being a Christian is a binary state (our position as either lost or saved in the eyes of God) that is not determined by ...


4

I myself has always been partial to the line from the movie "Constantine:" Angela Dodson: I guess God has a plan for all of us. John Constantine: God's a kid with an ant farm, lady. He's not planning anything. Now John's a cynic, and not a believer. In fact, at this point in the film he's about as un-sympathetic as possible without actually being ...


4

The answer to this question is always "Yes" in the Bible. If Jesus suffered we ought to suffer as well as we must partake in everything Jesus took. We suffer with him. We die with him. We'll live with him. 2 Timothy 2:12 If we suffer, we shall also reign with him: if we deny him, he also will deny us When Jesus was being led to Golgotha Luke ...


4

According to Jehovah Witness teaching, we are currently under the rule of Satan, not that of God (Jehovah). We see the horrid state of the world now as proof that we need God's kingdom to come here on earth as it is in heaven. We also believe that that time is almost here when there will be no more disease, famine, hatred, etc. See this link for more ...


4

The extraordinary thing about Jesus' suffering is not so much its physical intensity, but the fact that He, the Second Person of the Trinity, deigned to suffer. He did not have to, but he specifically wished to save us by enduring suffering. We should also keep in mind that Jesus, being God, had (and has) perfect knowledge of all the sins committed in the ...


4

I think I know what you're getting at with this question, but you've got to consider what St. Paul says: Col 1:24 Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I am filling up what is lacking in the afflictions of Christ on behalf of his body, which is the church, And that was at the beginning of the Church. It's not that St. ...


4

Jesus' death was sufficient simply because DEATH is the punishment for our sins, not suffering. Nowhere in the Bible does it say that the Savior must suffer for a long time to cover our sins, only His death. If you look at all these verses, we'll see that "Christ died" and it is enough: ...


3

Isaiah 53 is not just about sin. Much more so, it is certainly not just about disease. It is a picture of Christ on the cross, so all history leads up to this and all the future feeds back to this. The whole 'curse' of Adam was placed upo Him, and from Him the whole 'blessing' of Abraham is made. This is nothing less than the fall and return to paradise. So ...


3

Some Christians suffer more than others, but all Christians are guaranteed to suffer a little bit due to 2 Tim 3:12. You won't have to look for ways to suffer, you will suffer primarily because of Gal 4:29. The one born after the flesh (the unsaved world or the carnal nature in a believing Christian) is guaranteed to persecute those who walk in his Holy ...


3

Another argument for a existence of a just God despite the presence of evil is exactly that: the existence of evil. If God does not exist then morality is what humans make of it. If morality is what we make of it, then it shifts with time and location. Yet throughout time and cultures, we see certain moral codes virtually everywhere. Stealing is bad. ...


3

Yes, your arguments are correct. Here is some expansion and support… The first and best answer to suffering is the freewill defense. For God to make free creatures is worthwhile; truly free creatures are able to act for good or evil. People who cannot do certain things are not truly free. A person needs no other response, but other responses are available ...


3

Tim Keller in his book, Reason for God dedicates a chapter to this very issue. I'll provide a preview of what he says... He states it this way: If a good and powerful God exists, he would not allow pointless evil, but because there is much unjustifiable pointless evil in the world, the traditional good and powerful God could not exist. ... Tucked ...


3

Here's a quote from G.K. Chesterton which I think explicates a Catholic view of the subject: “That a good man may have his back to the wall is no more than we knew already, but that God could have His back to the wall is a boast for all insurgents forever. Christianity is the only religion on earth that has felt that omnipotence made God incomplete. ...


3

Note: The quotes I offer here are taken from the 1983 Catechism of the Catholic Church. There is an online version here. Numbers are the paragraph numbers for each point. 601 The Scriptures had foretold this divine plan of salvation through the putting to death of “the righteous one, my Servant” as a mystery of universal redemption, that is, as the ...



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