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14

Here is what Aquinas actually wrote: In each kind of thing the worst corruption is the corruption of the principle on which other things depend. Now the principles of reason are the things in accord in nature… and therefore, to act against what is determined by nature, is most serious and base. Therefore since in the sins against nature man transgress ...


11

I can only speak for Calvin. AFAIK, he never explicitly interacts with Aquinas or the Summa. In Institutes he does reference "The Schoolmen" many times, but he seems to have in mind mostly later-medieval theologians rather than the angelic doctor himself. That's a shame, because Aquinas would have been a much more worthy opponent. Protestants in general ...


8

Jesus' contemporary followers not only believed in "a god", they had a common understanding of the existence and nature of God, because his mission was to the people of Israel (cf. Jesus answer to the Canaanite woman in Matthew 15:14: "I was sent only to the lost sheep of the House of Israel"). This is not to assert that all of Jesus' followers came from the ...


7

Thomas Aquinas definitely took advantage of Aristotle (following the lead of Albertus Magnus) but he was not uncritical in his reception. Aristotle's major writings were only recently rediscovered in the West and were the topic of intense scholarly effort. But at the same time, there was a lot of doubt about whether Aristotle was a suitable source of ...


6

One of the founding ideas of Protestantism was "sola scriptura", meaning that we view the Bible as the only ultimate authority. That doesn't mean that we refuse to read any other books. The existence of thousands of Baptist bookstores should be adequate proof that that's not true. What it means is that we do not view any book other than the Bible as having ...


6

The statement “Crucifixion was not necessary for salvation and that only a drop of Jesus' blood needed to be spilled” could not have been from St. Thomas Aquinas. This is because it obliquely implies that there was no need for Christ to die, which is grossly against the tenets of Christianity. St. Thomas was one of the supreme advocates of Eucharistic ...


5

James Dolezol, a recent doctoral graduate of Westminster Seminary in Philadelphia, has written a book (which was his dissertation) on divine simplicity in which he traces the agreement of Reformed scholasticism to Thomist scholasticism on the doctrine of God. I have not yet read this book, but I was told about it by a friend of Dolezol's, and I listened to ...


5

Now we define "intelligence" and "rationality" otherwise than Aquinas and other scholastic philosophers did. In Aquinas' teaching, reason or rationality is what we usually mean by intelligence - it's the ability to induce new knowledge by reasoning based on experience we get through senses. "Intelligence" was slightly trickier. According to Aquinas and his ...


5

As far as what's necessary for salvation, we'd have to start with Baptism: Men are bound to that without which they cannot obtain salvation. Now it is manifest that no one can obtain salvation but through Christ; wherefore the Apostle says (Rom. 5:18): "As by the offense of one unto all men unto condemnation; so also by the justice of one, unto all men ...


4

Aquinas taught transubstantiation -- the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharist: Some men accordingly, not paying heed to these things, have contended that Christ's body and blood are not in this sacrament except as in a sign, a thing to be rejected as heretical, since it is contrary to Christ's words... He is invisibly under the species of this ...


4

There are two types of errors in the Summa. The first are of the type caused by a Medieval understanding of science and biology. The second are actual theological dead ends. The most famous of both has the first causing the second. Thomas believed that the entirety of the body was in the man's "seed". Because of this he argued that the Virgin Mary was ...


4

This answer is necessarily a bit long, because it requires some background. Skip ahead to "Gifts of the Holy Spirit" to skip the background. It is not exactly charity that perfects the virtues into the Gifts of the Holy Spirit, but the Holy Spirit Who gives the Gifts to those who are disposed to receive them. Some background Aquinas essentially assumes ...


4

Aquinas addresses the question from different angles a number of places in the Summa Theologica, in various parts of the "Treatise on the Most Holy Trinity" (First Part, Questions 27–43). The fundamental question is answered more or less directly in Question 27, "The Procession of the Divine Persons". Article 2 of this question, "Whether any ...


4

A smoking gun is in the references that John Calvin makes to Thomas Aquinas in his own book, The Institutes of the Christian Religion (II.11.4 and III.22.9). This is evidence that Calvin at least knew of Aquinas, which suggests that Aquinas' most important work had reached France or Switzerland and that he would probably have read it. Mark J. Larson says ...


3

The most generic Christian answer to this is quite simple: God did. No human—neither Aquinas nor any other philosopher or theologian—"laid the foundation for the existence of God". God has always existed and the impetus for revealing this truth to men has always been on him. This he has done in spades. Adam, the first man, walked and talked with God in a ...


3

Here's S.Th., I, q.46, a.2, ad 7, for reference: In efficient causes it is impossible to proceed to infinity "per se"—thus, there cannot be an infinite number of causes that are "per se" required for a certain effect; for instance, that a stone be moved by a stick, the stick by the hand, and so on to infinity. But it is not impossible to proceed to ...


3

St. Thomas Aquinas defines love (amor) as something that "belongs to the appetitive [spec., concupiscible] power which is a passive faculty" (Summa Theologica I-II q. 27 a. 1 c.). "Love (amor) is something pertaining to the appetite". (ibid. I-II q. 26 a. 1 c.)"Passion is the effect of the agent on the patient." (ibid. I-II q. 26 a. 2 c.) A sensitive ...


3

St Thomas Aquinas was canonized on July 18, 1323 and is commonly called the Angelic Doctor and the Universal Teacher. He is also the patron saint of Catholic academies, Catholic schools, Catholic universities, scholars, philosophers and theologians. What have the Popes said on St. Thomas? Pope St Pius V in 1567. St. Pius V declared him a Doctor of The ...


2

The Summa answers this nicely with a resounding, "Absolutely not." I'm lazy, so I'll just put Part III Question 46 Article 4 Objection 1 here: As Chrysostom [Athanasius, Orat. De Incarn. Verb.] says: "Christ had come in order to destroy death, not His own, (for since He is life itself, death could not be His), but men's death. Hence it was not by reason of ...


2

Aeoril says: "The idea of 'Natural Moral Law', if you are referring to the idea that one can discern moral truths from pure philosophical pursuits is something I would argue is untenable." I would suggest that you read Cicero's "De Legibus" ("On the Laws"). Within, you will find that Cicero arrives at many conclusions about of God and His law which ...


2

Check out at least these The Thomist articles:(note: the following is not an exhaustive listing of all The Thomist's articles on this topic) "Aquinas on Nature, Hypostasis, & the Metaphysics of the Incarnation" "Albert the Great & Thomas Aquinas on Person, Hypostasis, & Hypostatic Union," and especially:Jason L. A. West's "Aquinas on the ...


2

By St Thomas's time, infant baptism would have been the norm for many centuries. However, confirmation has always had to fight for survival, in that it is not necessary for salvation and therefore once it was separated from baptism it was hard to get people to bring their children of any age to receive it on the rare occasions when the bishop happened to be ...


2

Although St. Thomas Aquinas is said to have "reconciled" Aristotle with Christian theology, he rejects much of Aristotle (e.g., he rejects that Aristotle thought the world is eternal).(Interestingly, St. Thomas refers to Aristotle as "Aristotle" when he disagrees with him and as "The Philosopher" when he agrees with him.) Understand Scholastic terminology. ...


1

St. Thomas says in Super Sent., lib. 2 d. 19 q. 1 a. 2 s.c. 2 Super Sent., lib. 4 d. 20 q. 1 a. 1 qc. 3 arg. 3 Super Sent., lib. 4 d. 44 q. 3 a. 1 qc. 2 arg. 3 that "death is the greatest of punishments" ("mors est maxima poenarum"). Also, he writes in Summa Theologiae II-II, q. 79 a. 4 arg. 4: …the pain of loss which consists in being deprived of ...


1

The Summa Theologiae and in the third book of the Summa "Contra Gentiles" CAtholic answers (I did not hear the program) may have been paraphrasing the concept of Aquinas's view of original justice and the effect it has on our inability to recognize sin.


1

Begetting ( present participle of the verb "beget") - To procreate an offspring. To beget is to make someone have one's nature. The purpose of begetting is to pass on genome ( whole nature) to the offspring. Elements of Divine Begetting 1) Male ( John 1:14,18) 2) Womb ( Ps. 110:3, John 1:18) 53) Divine nature (John 1:1,18) Elements of Human Begetting ...



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