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17

Reasoning can take you a long way. Just look at this community. Being a part of the StackExchange network, a good percentage of the members (including myself) come from a highly technical, scientific background, and would likely revolt at the thought of rationality being incompatible with Christian faith. The problem is that reasoning is only a process. ...


8

I'm focusing here on the aspect that you are finding it possible to relate to; namely Deism. Deism is, in the conventional form, the "light the blue touch paper and retire" deity - i.e. that sets up the initial conditions, and then bows out. And this is where it gets interesting, since Deism traditionally breaks the link with all supernatural activity, and ...


8

Isaiah 1:18 (ESV) “Come now, let us reason together, says the LORD: though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool. The Christian God is a God of order, and He is the author and sustainer of all of creation, which, I believe, explains the transcendental ...


8

The Practice of the Presence of God is one of a variety of different Christian "classics" which really cross denominational boundaries (Imitation of Christ might be another). Since the truths it discusses are universal to Christianity and because there is very little in the document which must be Catholic, its benefits are generally considered to far ...


7

The strictly empirical worldview seems reductionistic to thoughtful Christians (not to mention many atheists etc.) because, in their view, it fails to adequately account for phenomena such as love, beauty, reason, morality, the "unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics," and the like. Moreover, empiricism as a worldview seems to fail on its own terms ...


7

You are right to be very skeptical: This section contains a list of Certified Mediums who have completed the Mediumship Mentorship Program facilitated by Doreen Virtue. See what Deuteronomy 18:10-12 says about mediums. The Catholic Church has a document on "New Age" that talks about exactly this phenomenon: 2.2. What does the New Age claim to ...


7

Historically, there have been four sources of Theology: Scripture Tradition Reason Experience Each of these is a tool that we can use to answer questions about God, and each has its pros and cons. The best theology draws from all of these sources. A good resource for understanding the pros and cons of reason as a source of theology is the "Theology ...


6

This subject is all about balance. Rationalism and Mysticism are the extremes to avoid. Your question does not seem biased to either extreme. I do not think you will find reformers making direct attacks upon particular forms of meditation so long as those meditating, mediated on those objective doctrines that they taught! The moment any type of mysticism ...


6

I can tell you what Catholicism has to say about it, for the most part. Though, if you're looking for some survey of western Christians to get some sense of what all of them think mysticism is, this isn't the forum for that. But, even without a poll, I can say with high confidence that most Christians, especially those from larger denominations like ...


4

This seems more to refer to the phenomena which Paul recounts when he says, 'I die daily'; in short, one may wake up in the morning with hope that he will walk according to the ways of God, but in the evening find that he hasn't. This is not bipolar; it is realistic and one of the reasons each person can say with certainty, 'I am the chief of all sinners'. ...


4

Not sure about the bipolar condition specifically, but there is an interesting Biblical story very similar to what you describe in the life of Elijah. In 1 Kings 18, he wins a powerful victory over the Baal prophets, with clear Divine intervention. However, in the very next chapter, he becomes suicidal: He came to a broom tree, sat down under it and ...


4

I'm addressing all of the inquisitions, not merely the Spanish Inquisition here. Several were perpetrated by kings, not the Catholic Church. I agree with the other answers that state that the Inquisition is a stain and an evil that should never have happened. None of what I'm posting here should be taken in any way that detracts from @James Black's ...


4

The impact on the Spanish Inquisition on Christianity is more of an example when people use religion as a way to gain more political power. Unfortunately we see this same behavior, the justification of following God's will in various parts of the world, such as the problems in Nigeria and the atrocities in the Sudan. When leaders, or political activists ...


2

Barbara Bradley Haggerty (most known for being NPRs religion correspondent but also a former Christian Science practitioner turned Christian herself) investigated many of these claims in her book The Fingerprints of God. The book seeks to be a compendium of scientific investigations about the brain and its relationship to God. While to book itself is ...


2

Reasoning can be a pathway to faith, but is not a requirement. If reasoning involves logical arguments, AND if you start with the appropriate premises, you can arrive at faith. If you do not accept the right premises, reasoning can drive you away from faith. Of course, many faithful come to faith without relying on reason at all. Abraham, for instance, ...


2

The main problem is your friends' world views are fundamentally opposed to yours (or at least to what they understand is yours). Most "harmless" words of encouragement between Christians fall on, at best, deaf ears to someone who doesn't share your set of "givens". Do not give dogs what is sacred; do not throw your pearls to pigs. If you do, they may ...


2

I'm coming from a United Methodist tradition, if that makes a difference The disciples asked Jesus why he spoke in parables. He replied in Matthew 13:11-13 (NRSV) [Jesus] answered, ‘To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been given. For to those who have, more will be given, and they will have an ...


2

The answer to your question, depends on whether or not you count the Orthodox Church among those whom you recognize as Christian. In the Orthodox Church they practice what is known as hesychasm which is supposedly a transcendental experience in which the hesychasts Transcend from the conscious ego to the Spirit ego. An ancient mystical tradition was lost ...


1

The Protestant Episcopal Church of the USA has exercises for its members to create environments in which the Spirit can flow. For instance "men's groups" which meet weekly usually for breakfast and to listen to a speaker - there is a Q&A. Many members are stimulated to give more attention to God, by meditation on the Word of God, and by mulling over ...


1

This is a very difficult question to answer. There are some anti-mystic Christians that claim anybody who slightly leans to the appreciation of poetry as an evil mystic. There are also very emotional people drawn to mysticism to such a degree that they seem incapable of properly thinking through any doctrine at all. To get down to the heart of the ...


1

Give me one biblical example of where any such stuff was mentioned. Sorry for the short answer (:P) but either power is ascribed to God or Satan. I tend to think of "Cosmic Energy" as nonsense, but where it to exist, I'm not sure the distinction between it and supernatural (God or Satan) forces. To say there's a relationship between Jesus and such stuff ...


1

I'll take "threaten the Christian beliefs" to mean that neurotheology's future findings might make some who are Christian change these beliefs to something else. I'd say there is a reasonable chance. More strongly, of all scientific enterprises, if any can do it, neurotheology probably has the greatest chance. Take free will, as you mentioned, as one ...


1

In its present form, neurotheology is not a threat to Christianity (though a few specific beliefs may be overturned). The reason is that regardless of what is found about the neural basis of spiritual experiences, this only tells you what is there not why it is there. Thus, either one can view these findings as the way in which God imparts certain types of ...


1

Understanding the inquisition only in the cristianity (or spanish context) is a biased and reduced conception. Nowadays, when the concept of laicism has evolved sufficent to create a neat distinction between religious identity and national membership in Western societies the Inquisition is seen as a mounstruosity, but in old ages that distiction was more ...



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