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10

At the risk of making enemies from both sides of the war over abortion, I will merely provide my opinion. There is no way of knowing when God breathes a soul into a fetus. At conception? Somewhere in the Middle? Biblically we know it happens in the womb at some point because babies in the womb respond to God. For example: When Elizabeth heard Mary's ...


7

The Bible doesn't explicitly say whether or not we exist prior to conception. The Psalm 139 passage you referenced indicates that God knew us before we were born and saw our unformed body. However, this is not a definitive statement that we existed prior to birth. Contextually, it seems much more probably to be referring to the omniscience of God (from ...


7

what I am asking is that you evaluate my interpretation of the Scriptures Faulty / Insufficient. The conclusions you have drawn from these verses are quite different from what most Christian scholars through the ages have concluded. In fact they are almost completely novel. Arriving at a novel conclusion not held by your own or any other major ...


6

One possible interpretation is that the tree of life would have given them eternal physical life. After the Fall, this would have been in a state of separation from God. So, God prevented them from living forever in this state of separation. God's purpose was that they live forever in communion with Him.


6

You could try and break it down, i.e. soul = makes Godly choices, heart = serving God with emotional commitment, strength = using your actual body to serve God and mind = using your intelligence govern your actions. However, the Scriptures don't support any such breakdown as far as I'm aware and I think both in Deuteronomy and when Jesus said it, the ...


5

In addition to the cryptic references that you mentioned in Jeremiah 1:5 and Psalm 139:15-16, there is a clear reference in the apocryphal book Book of Wisdom 8:19-20: As a child I was naturally gifted, and a good soul fell to my lot; or rather, being good, I entered an undefiled body (NRSVCE). The author of this book was almost certainly heavily ...


5

For one thing, while ψυχη (transliterated psuchḗ or psyche) is often translated soul as in the verses you have quoted, it is also just as often translated as life as in: Matthew 10:39 (KJV) He that findeth his life shall lose it:and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it. So for every verse where soul is used, try substituting life and see ...


5

First, let's have some slightly more in-depth definitions. Charles Hodge describes what traducianists believe as follows: Traducianists on the one hand deny that the soul is created; and on the other hand, they affirm that it is produced by the law of generation, being as truly derived from the parents as the body. The whole man, soul and body, is ...


4

Regardless of whether you actually wanted a Biblical Answer, (there was a christian-thermodynamics tag until it got nuked) here is the answer, from the undisputed captain of answers like these St. Thomas Aquinas: The human soul, by reason of its perfection, is not a form merged in matter, or entirely embraced by matter. Therefore there is nothing to ...


4

Generally speaking, the Hebrew Bible does not distinguish between "body" and "soul." The Hebrew word for life, nephesh refers to the "vital life forces," that is, breathing, pulse, etc. There certainly are intimations of afterlife in the HB, but most scholars agree that an eternal soul was not part of Israelite Religion—at least not in the Platonic sense. ...


4

The problem is what we see as soul has different meanings based on when in history you are looking at it. For example, the Hebrews didn't see the soul as immortal, as shown here: "The soul [nephesh] who sins shall die" (Ezekiel 18:4, 20) So, the soul (word was nephesh) was not immortal. Then in the first century AD, Philo introduced the immortal soul ...


4

I don't know of any official position other than at conception (i know individuals who disagree though), but I haven't heard any body defend that position in detail. Before you asked this, I didn't really think I needed a reason to accept that other than the fact that when a human egg is fertilized the result is always going to be human and not some other ...


4

There are indeed many verses that speak of Hell as being eternal although there aren't so many that make the clear that the punishment is also eternal. Here are a couple: Matthew 25:46 (NIV) “Then they will go away to eternal punishment, but the righteous to eternal life.” 2 Thessalonians 1:8-9 (NIV) 8 He will punish those who do not know God ...


4

Matthew 22:37-38 (NIV) 37 Jesus replied: “‘Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind.’ 38 This is the first and greatest commandment. This is the first and greatest commandment. I think that it's pretty ironic that nobody can answer what this means, considering the biggest forgivable sin is ...


4

EDIT FROM THE COMMENT BELOW Reading trough systematic theology books, I found that Christians hold that the human has two are three parts. The two parts view says that the human is body (material) and soul(immaterial), the three parts folks hold the position that human are body(material), soul(feeling), conscience(image of God, moral center). Here are two ...


4

Other places Pink mentions his tripartite view of man are: Gleanings in Genesis, p. 107 "Is it not clear then that the ark divided into three stories more than hints at our threefold salvation in Christ? The salvation which we have in Christ is a threefold one, and that in a double sense. It is a salvation which embraces each part of our threefold ...


4

As Caleb pointed out, most of these verses you have quoted aren’t actually using the word “soul” to refer to the same theological concept you’re trying to get at. As an addendum to that, I note that one reason for that discrepancy in usage is that you’ve selected a bunch of New Testament verses that are quoting the Septuagint. Matthew 12 is quoting Isaiah ...


4

Yes, with caveats. The challenge here is what constitutes "teaching" the pre-existence of souls. Proponents of the doctrine will naturally find more instances of this than others, as will be seen shortly. However, even a "mainstream" treatment (Philip Schaff, History of the Christian Church) mentions others as holding views similar to Origen: Even ...


3

You ask for a view from Christian scholars, so here's one (not mine): In "Cosmos, Creator, and Human Destiny", Dave Hunt argues that the difference between humans and lower animals is in the brain, but that the brain is just matter, and: as we will continue to remind readers, matter cannot think (no basis, evidence, qualification, explanation or ...


3

According to David, he was sinful at conception. Surely to be sinful, we must have a soul to place the sin on. Psalm 51:5 NIV 5 Surely I was sinful at birth, sinful from the time my mother conceived me.


3

A body is animated by the soul. Jesus’ body was no different, except that it was both fully human and fully divine: there wasn’t a “human part” and a “divine part”. As his whole nature was fully human and fully divine, it follows that his soul was both fully human and fully divine as well, for he could not be the Word Incarnate without the Word being part of ...


3

Among the meanings of ψυχε (psuche, 5590; soul, life) is "the seat of the feelings, desires, affections, aversions (our heart, soul etc.)" I'm not certain what it would mean for my "(eternal) soul"/"living being"/"union of body and spirit" to be grieved. I think it makes much more sense to read his statement in a poetic sense, as: "My heart is deeply ...


3

Your question contains a small irony. Each component in your quartet (viz., soul, spirit, and heart) is invisible, and you are asking for a diagrammatic representation! (My observation is just an aside.) If, however, I were to diagram your three highly abstract words, I'd probably draw a heart; you know, the typical Valentine's Day heart, which is probably ...


3

There is no Scriptural evidence that I find to support that claim. However, I believe that the following scripture does support the idea that not only life, but the Soul begins at conception. Genesis 2:7 KJV And the LORD God formed man of the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul. Many who ...


3

Under II. "BODY AND SOUL BUT TRULY ONE", from the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 365, the Church teaches that: 365 The unity of soul and body is so profound that one has to consider the soul to be the "form" of the body:1 i.e., it is because of its spiritual soul that the body made of matter becomes a living, human body; spirit and matter, in man, ...


3

Great question. It's a little of both. (We'd have to define what time means for God.) But I suppose we could infer Origen believed Christ's soul - as he believed of all souls - is eternal. According to his writings, all souls were created by God at some time prior to conception. Let us inquire whether God, the creator and founder of all things, ...


2

A soul is the combination of the body and the spirit. And I, the Lord God, formed man from the dust of the ground, and breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; and man became a living soul; Genesis 2:8 IV The spirit was created before the body, possibly even before the creation. Nevertheless, all things were before created, but spiritually ...


2

This answer is based on the Christian theology of Emanuel Swedenborg (1688-1772), and reflects the views of the "Swedenborgian" or "New Church" denominations that accept his theology. Except for the last part, about the "Peaceable Kingdom" passages in Isaiah, this answer is extracted and edited from my article, "Will We See our Pets Again in Heaven?" ...



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