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I can state what I believe are the Eastern Orthodox (my faith) answers to your questions. For example, one commonly stated purpose of the church is to evangelize the lost. But is that actually necessary in a wider hope/inclusive framework? (see related question) If not, then what is the purpose? The Church (capital "C") is what Christ established ...


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What do Protestant churches teach about the fate of deceased infants? Although this subject can be woven into the various doctrines of infant baptism, most Protestants would look to a biblical basis for their doctrine. The only verse that comes close to describing a specific teaching on this describes David’s reaction to the loss of his son; 2 Samuel 12:...


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I also identify as an evangelical universalist and would echo Tim's answer here regarding the context of stillbirth. I thought I'd also add an excerpt from George Macdonald (19th-century Scottish author, poet, Christian minister; spiritual mentor of C.S. Lewis) related to this question, as he is a figure many/most evangelical universalists resonate with. ...


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I identify as an evangelical universalist. I don't know if you'll find this worthwhile, but here's my take. It sounds an awful lot like a figure of speech to me. If it is, it's best not to draw too many conclusions based on it. (Bart Ehrman left the faith because the mustard seed isn't really the smallest of all seeds.) In support of the figure of speech ...


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The salvation of infants within Protestant denominations cover a wide range of alternate views. The subject is closely related to different view of infant baptism but not identical. To avoid the subject of how baptism has its role in the subject, I would like to limit the scenario to a child that dies before having a chance of being baptized. To keep ...


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When we put several passages together to get a fuller picture, we can see in what sense "overlook" is being used. Consider the following two verses, which are similar in scope (from the NET translation): Rom. 3:25 God publicly displayed him at his death as the mercy seat accessible through faith. This was to demonstrate his righteousness, because God ...


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You must believe that God took on human form in the person of Jesus. 1 John 4:2-3 2 This is how you can recognize the Spirit of God: Every spirit that acknowledges that Jesus Christ has come in the flesh is from God, 3 but every spirit that does not acknowledge Jesus is not from God. This is the spirit of the antichrist, which you have heard is ...


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TLDR; It's easy to prove the answer is "The case cannot be made directly from scripture." Now, it's discouraged here to answer a question other than the one asked, but I'm going to do a bit of that here to demonstrate why the answer must be "No." If such a basis exists, it's not found directly in scripture Even the most superficial research will show ...


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Acts 16:31 states They replied, “Believe in the Lord Jesus and you will be saved, you and your household.” And Acts 10:43 says, About him [Jesus] all the prophets testify, that everyone who believes in him receives forgiveness of sins through his name. Similarly, John 3:16 says For this is the way God loved the world: He gave his one and only ...


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Jesus himself equates salvation with knowing God: Now this is eternal life: that they know you, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom you have sent. - John 17:3 NIV Elsewhere, the scriptures negate the idea that this could be a mere intellectual knowledge about God: You believe that there is one God. Good! Even the demons believe that—and ...



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