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Per current teaching in the Catechism, each person earns a particular judgment: CCC 1022 Each man receives his eternal retribution in his immortal soul at the very moment of his death, in a particular judgment that refers his life to Christ: either entrance into the blessedness of heaven-through a purification or immediately, or immediate and everlasting ...


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The definitive difference between what St. Augustine believed and what Luther in all honesty came up with himself is quite different. It's like this: St. Augustine taught that grace is itself transformative and is infused into the soul of humanity, whereby changing their condition and makes the sinner righteous before God. So that when God sees the persons ...


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The Church of England is a wide-ranging denomination, and different parts of it hold different view on the nature of baptism. Many members prefer to delay baptism of children until they are old enough to decide for themselves. Others will see baptism as purely symbolic. I would be confident in asserting that there is no universally held opinion about the ...


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As far as why individual Catholics participate in the various liturgies and sacraments, there can be all sorts of reasons, from the highly religious to the merely social or cultural. The Church does have teachings on the subject, though; let's look at those. As far as going to Mass on Sundays (and some other days): This is a requirement for Catholics. In ...


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I think this is simply because English has changed. In modern English "faith of Christ" would mean that faith that Christ had, whereas "faith in Christ" expresses the need to put faith in Christ, i.e. to trust in Christ for salvation. I have no doubt that the translators of the King James were trying to express the same meaning when using "faith of Christ" ...


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I've found two sources online for the Latin text, but unfortunately nothing in English. The Latin is available in Gousset's Les actes de la province ecclésiastique de Reims, page 233, as well as Hefele's Conciliengeschichte, volume IV, page 187. The first of these includes a very brief introduction in French, while the second has more extensive commentary ...



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