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As one of the comments stated, in order to understand why Christians believe Jesus to be the 'Son of God', you'll want to grasp the concepts of the Incarnation of the Logos (God's Word, also sometimes referred to as the 'Wisdom of God' assuming flesh). And the trinity, which is the concept that there are three Persons in a single being. This is a difficult ...


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Not all denominations of Christianity give the same answer to this question. But probably all Christians can agree that we believe Jesus to be the Son of God, because he said he was, and the Scriptures repeatedly tell us that's who he is: "For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish, ...


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Just as God created the universe, the angels and physical creatures he created Jesus. In Colossians 1:15 Jesus is called the "firstborn of all creation" and in verse 16 "For by Him all things were created, both in the heavens and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or dominions or rulers or authorities-- all things have been ...


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Jesus is the SOFIA of God according to 1 Corinthians 1:24. 1 Corinthians 1:24 Westcott and Hort / [NA27 variants] αὐτοῖς δὲ τοῖς κλητοῖς, Ἰουδαίοις τε καὶ Ἕλλησιν, Χριστὸν θεοῦ δύναμιν καὶ θεοῦ σοφίαν. There are plethora of inspired texts that identify Jesus as God's Wisdom per se. Jesus is God's Wisdom in the Synoptics: Matthew 12:42 = ...


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St. Thomas Aquinas, the greatest Doctor of the Church, said in his Summa Theologica I q. 32 a. 1 c.: It is impossible to attain to the knowledge of the Trinity by natural reason. Thus, faith is necessary to understand "what belongs to the distinction of the persons," St. Thomas continues, and "by natural reason we can [only] know what belongs to the ...


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These other answers are so long they are hard to read. (no offence) I give this place credit, but I will break it down for you. “I and the Father are one.” (John 10:30) Jesus didn't say he was like the Father, he said that he was one with the Father. “…He who has seen Me has seen the Father.” (John 14:9) This is possibly my favorite verse regarding this ...


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Orthodox explanations of this apparant paradox centre on drawing a subtle distinction between the attributes manifested by the incarnated Christ versus the inherant attributes of the glorified eternal Son of God. According to the creeds, they are one and the same person - there is no distinction in their essential nature - however, the scriptures tell us: ...


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There is already a question on this site that addresses (1) whether the Word (i.e., the Son) is truly God, like the Father; and (2) whether Jesus Christ is fully God, and goes over the most important Scriptural passages to justify both claims. Have a look at What are the biblical arguments against Arianism? As that question makes clear, the questions you are ...


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While I do not think your question as to whether there are others that doubt the Trinity is relevant (this is not a discussion board), the verses you mention and the questions you raise have been controversial topics since at least the 4th century. What your questions are leading to is known in Christology as "monophysitism," which was the position taken by ...



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