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16

Solomon married his concubines, so he wasn't practicing adultery - just polygamy, which was not forbidden. David murdered Uriah, but did it by proxy. He did not kill Uriah, rather he set up a situation in which he would fall in battle. Beyond that, yes David "killed his ten thousands," but did so in battle, and thus it isn't murder. And as Caleb pointed ...


13

Yes, there was a special provision. God personally enacted a punishment. In the case of David, God caused his son to die and did not permit him to be the one to build the temple. 2 Samuel 12:14 (ESV) Nevertheless, because by this deed you have utterly scorned the Lord, the child who is born to you shall die. 1 Chronicles 28:3 (ESV) But God said ...


8

There were specific instructions for the king of Israel to not acquire many wives for himself, since that could have the effect of turning his heart away from the Lord. This text predates the first king of Israel, so I would say that David and Solomon should have known that this was forbidden. (Note: the Bible did not actually forbid them from polygamy, ...


8

If anything, it would be the other way around. Boaz was David's great grandfather. Solomon was David's son. The Temple wasn't built until Solomon's time. According to Eerdmann's Dictionary of the Bible, some scholars believe the names of the columns may have gotten their names from "a dynastic inscription" upon them. Since Boaz is, indeed, in David's ...


7

Why Solomon's temple? What does it have to do with the Christian faith? The temple that Solomon built was magnificent, and the glory of the Lord filled it 2 Chr 7:1 But it was only good because of the LORD. Otherwise it was just big stones and gold plating, valuable sure, but also meaningless, as Solomon himself would attest in Ecclesiastes. Under Roman ...


6

The Bible never says Solomon's multiple wives was not a sin. It was actually the reason he lost his kingdom. In 1 Kings 11:4 his multiple wives drew him away from his full devotion to The Lord and eventually to other gods. In 1 Kings 11:11, The Lord tells Solomon that because he did not keep God's covenant, He would take away Solomon's kingdom and give it to ...


6

The Matthew Henry commentary says that this passage is referring to the family of David, including Solomon; it also refers to Christ, who Henry says is sometimes called David or Son of David. The section in which you're questioning the iniquity is not referring to Christ himself; rather, its talking about His spiritual seed (or believers). Believers have ...


6

As neither the Bible nor any other source that I know of says where Solomon got these names, we can only speculate. It's possible he named Boaz after his ancestor. Note he named the other pillar Jachin. The only mention I can find of a Jachin in the Bible before Solomon's time is Gen 46:10 and some related passages where it says that one of Simeon's sons ...


5

Proverbs 1:4-5 tells us his audience: 4 for giving prudence to those who are simple, knowledge and discretion to the young— 5 let the wise listen and add to their learning, and let the discerning get guidance— They were written to the "simple," which the NIV defines as "The Hebrew word rendered simple in Proverbs denotes a person who is gullible, ...


5

The relationship is perhaps best explained by theNew York Times article to which you refer: Scholars say that the Universal Church’s promotion of Jewish symbolism in its replica of Solomon’s Temple stems from a quest for historical legitimacy in a church that is just 37 years old. In other words, the symbolism of the Solomon’s Temple replica is a ...


4

No Having multiple wives was not a sin back then, as it is not a sin now (outside if it being illegal). History At the time of Abraham, David, Solomon, and Jesus, polygamy was part of the culture. Even in Jesus' times, polygamy was allowed and part of the customs of the Israeli people. The historian Josephus noted that Herod was allowed to have multiple ...


4

As usual, my answer is long-winded, but it is, I hope, worth reading nevertheless. In answering many such questions, we need to take the long view, so to speak, and treat an important issue such as this one in the context of the entire canon of Scripture, which we today--unlike the saints of old--have the privilege of possessing in its fullness. Did ...


2

The tradition insists that the passage is indeed about Solomon. Note that the passage does not say that Solomon's kingdom will last — in the event, it did not — but that the throne of the kingdom would endure whether the earthly kingdom did or not. And the Christian tradition would see that promise as fulfilled because Jesus is currently occupying that ...


2

Answering how many there actually were isn't going to be possible here because there is a definite conflict between the verses, and the honest answer is "nobody's sure". And opinion answers don't count here. Since your question is a valid one asked quite often, I hope you'll indulge me and let me answer something slightly different that still gets at the ...


2

Difference in Time One number was taken at the beginning of his reign, the other at the end. This is at least plausible, even if it is not a very satisfying explanation. Counting Different Things These two accounts were not written by the same person. It is possible that what the respective authors considered a "stall" was functionally different ("stalls ...


2

This question isn't really a Christian doctrinal question, I think. But, the most obvious answer here is that they were both kings. And the literal letter of God's law is always enacted by people (like the King's army or guards), who are generally under the rule of the king -- notably as a sort of proxy for God in the case of the Jews. So, the king probably ...


2

I was just thinking about that. Then I remembered I Corinthians 7:19 NET Circumcision is nothing and uncircumcision is nothing. Instead, keeping God's commandments is what counts. Here Paul was talking about people having an OT vs Christ battle. But Paul reminds them that since the begging God wanted us to obey him. People were complaining about the ...


1

Maybe it was because Solomon took a census of all the foreigners, while David numbered the children of Israel without making this offering: And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, When thou takest the sum of the children of Israel after their number, then shall they give every man a ransom for his soul unto the LORD, when thou numberest them; that there be ...


1

In addition to the answers above I would like to add, that once we are saved we have a job assigned to us by Christ, which is known as the great commission. Mar 16:15 through 18 King James translation And he said unto them, Go ye into all the world, and preach the gospel to every creature. He that believeth and is baptized shall be saved; but he that ...


1

All is vanity means than nothing in this world can give real pleasure. Solomon wrote that he tasted all can be tasted and found that all this is vanity. He wrote this to warn us not to follow all this vanity. Our main task on this earth is to found God. http://www.gotquestions.org/purpose-of-life.html


1

None of these answers address the apparent conflict of a just king who is above the law and not accountable to its penalties- even to God. They also seem to underestimate the commitment of the Hebrew people to justice and impartiality of the law (we can't conclude that the courts contemporary to David's rule were corrupt), and disregard that the law was both ...



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