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9

The first extant writing to contain the phrase is John Calvin's Antidote to the Council of Trent (1547). First, for context, Calvin was responding to Canon 11 of the sixth session of the Council of Trent (which you can read at the above link): Whosoever shall say that men are justified by the mere imputation of Christ's righteousness, or by the mere ...


8

I intend to respond considering primarily the 'mainstream' Protestant denominations, with minimal (if any) reference to the more obscure sects. This is because I think the term 'Protestant' belongs to those who accept a handful of certain beliefs (trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that are often not present in the more rare denominations. Referring to ...


5

These two slogans were used to explain two major disagreements Protestants had with what the Catholic Church was teaching, and yes, they are designed to work together! They don't compete, they are alone in their own respective fields. Sola Fide refers to the belief that works are not a means or prerequisite for salvation. People are declared to be justified ...


4

The doctrine of Sola fide (Latin for "by faith alone") holds that: God's pardon for guilty sinners is granted to and received through faith alone, excluding all "works." And that: God, on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ alone (solus Christus), grants sinners judicial pardon, or justification, which is ...


3

Seventh Day Adventists is also a mainstream protestant denomination (with trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that stresses faith but places importance on the fruits of faith for salvation. As many founders were methodists who embraced the Millerite movement, methodists and Seventh Day Adventists share some commonality in their understanding of salvation. ...


2

You're correct that Methodist don't accept sola scriptura, but instead prima scriptura. Not only that, they also reject sola fide. That is because they teach synergism. Now, I do know some Pentecostals also hold to synergism, and therefore reject sola fide. Also, if you consider Anglicanism to be Protestant (which most don't, but they are related) there are ...


1

Disclaimer: I don't profess to reflect the views of any of the "reformers" in my solution below. It is important to be very accurate when using terms. This is part of correctly distinguishing ("rightly dividing") the scriptures: "justification" relates to the forgiveness of sins. This is entirely on the basis of faith. "salvation" refers to deliverance ...


1

St. Augustine taught one can lose their salvation by their actions (which protestants call 'works') even if they have the faith - this contradicts the five solas and Luther's concept of Simul Iustus et Peccator (at the same time just and a sinner) St. Augustine on how mortal and venial sins are forgiven “But do not commit those sins on account of ...



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