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9

Calvin The first extant writing to contain the phrase is John Calvin's Antidote to the Council of Trent (1547). First, for context, Calvin was responding to Canon 11 of the sixth session of the Council of Trent (which you can read at the above link): Whosoever shall say that men are justified by the mere imputation of Christ's righteousness, or by the ...


8

I intend to respond considering primarily the 'mainstream' Protestant denominations, with minimal (if any) reference to the more obscure sects. This is because I think the term 'Protestant' belongs to those who accept a handful of certain beliefs (trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that are often not present in the more rare denominations. Referring to ...


5

Below I've tried to summarize Calvin's views and then characterize Pelagius' as they relate to salvation by faith alone. All quotes from Calvin below are from his Institutes of the Christian religion. I will therefore just reference chapter and part in my quotes from Calvin. I left Luther out, because I don't have any of his books on hand. Faith Alone ...


5

The doctrine of Sola fide (Latin for "by faith alone") holds that: God's pardon for guilty sinners is granted to and received through faith alone, excluding all "works." And that: God, on the basis of the life, death, and resurrection of his Son, Jesus Christ alone (solus Christus), grants sinners judicial pardon, or justification, which is ...


3

Seventh Day Adventists is also a mainstream protestant denomination (with trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that stresses faith but places importance on the fruits of faith for salvation. As many founders were methodists who embraced the Millerite movement, methodists and Seventh Day Adventists share some commonality in their understanding of salvation. ...


3

According to Emanuel Swedenborg, faith without works does not save a person (Note: This section can be skipped by those who are interested only in the Swedenborgian interpretation of Luke 23:39-43. The purpose of this section is to establish that Swedenborg, and Swedenborgians, reject justification by faith alone, and believe that good works are also ...


2

Protestant leaders like Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Charles Spurgeon address these particular verses in their respective commentaries on the Psalms. All three emphasize a difference between David's righteousness before men and his righteousness before God, and that the source of the latter is God's grace alone. Regarding Psalm 7:8, Calvin answers that ...


2

To be clear (at the risk of being blunt), the thought that "faith alone saves, but never remains alone" (the great 'licet numquam sit sola" phrase) is not just attributed to Luther, but it is spoken by luther in various shapes and forms early and often. In Luther's series on faith (1520) he writes: 14: Works infallibly follow justifying faith, since ...


2

Yes, clearly and obviously, Luther added the word "alone" to his translation. But that's not the real question to ask. If you'll permit a small digression, the real question is why. It is clear that his reason is to make the meaning of the greek in the receptor language (german). In other words, the greek carries with it the nuance of 'alone' in the greek ...


1

The short answer, is that works are not a requirement of salvation, but are an indication of salvation through faith, and the Holy Spirit working within the heart of the saved person. As such, the virgins in the parable that were not prepared were not of faith, as indicated by their surprise at the arrival of the bridegroom. Keep in mind that this parable ...



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