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Christianity is not, "just a belief system", nor is it "also a system for organizing and governing society". It is simply the way for imperfect people to get into an eternal relationship with a perfect God, not by our good works but by the gift of Jesus. John puts it better than I can: John 3:16 For God so loved the world that he gave his one and ...


4

Many religions and societies have a shared core of moral precepts. For example, the Dalai Lama writes on this topic: All religions teach moral precepts for perfecting the functions of mind, body, and speech. All teach us not to lie or steal or take others' lives, and so on. The common goal of all moral precepts laid down by the great teachers of ...


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As a Christian, I tend to define morality based on the Bible. Can this same gauge be used for societies? How can I apply this metric to societies that are undeniably non-Christian? In almost all societies, it can't. Perhaps the only societies where this can be used is those where by definition those societies genuinely use the Bible as their moral ...


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Without morals being somehow based on a common rule of law, such as the Bible, then there can be no true rule for morality unless leaders of a society set the guidelines for morality. In most modern day societies, morals are basically the same as in the Bible. Thou shalt not kill and steal are just two examples. But without a true basic morality structure ...


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In Romans, Paul mentions that the Gentiles can do good, because the morals are written on their heart. Romans 2:14-15 NIV 14 (Indeed, when Gentiles, who do not have the law, do by nature things required by the law, they are a law for themselves, even though they do not have the law. 15 They show that the requirements of the law are written on ...


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This question is particularly difficult to answer because it is not clear who should evaluate what is moral. If Biblical morality is the standard, then I strongly suspect that it would "encourage" openness to the Gospel for the trivial reason that there isn't much reason to adopt those features of Biblical morality that are not found in other moral systems ...


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The Jews of Jesus's time were not particularly moral; they were particularly moralistic. They went to great lengths to put on outward appearances of piety, which repeatedly earned them the condemnatory epithet of "hypocrites!" from the Savior. We get a pretty good sense of what they were like from the Gospels. For example, using legalistic tricks to get ...


1

Islam proposes a system of government. But the Bible does not. Although many systems with Christian beliefs have tried to force a political system or government. I would say that they failed. I am not saying in any way that a Christian should not do politics and act out of his belief system. What I am saying is more that there is no such thing as a ...


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If you liked Mere Christianity, you might like to read Screwtape Letters and see what Lewis has to say about using Christianity to further political ends. That being said, Christianity is the basis for a Church, which is a bigger thing than a government. In the OT, we've got the Covenants (Individual: Adam and Eve, Familial: Noah and his Family; Tribal: ...


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My counter question: what would be the source of the morals for a "moral" society? People don't--on their own--behave in a moral manner. I would contend that a moral society is one driven by a moral standard outlined by a specific religion. To break this down even more clearly: a moral society is driven by a set of morals. Sets of morals are driving ...



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