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6

Firstly, understand that men and women are made in the image of God, who by His nature defines 'goodness'. There was always a 'law' before it was written on tablets of stone and given to Moses: God sets the standard of righteousness by what remains in accord to His nature and unrighteousness by what constitutes rebellion against His nature. To the extent ...


5

Catholic Perspective Tackling the sin part Highlighting a false premise, that one must experience something for one to know/understand it. It is worth noting that experience is a type of knowledge ... This is actually quite a loaded question philosophically, theologically, etc. Theologically, there is always mystery. 2 Timothy 2:13 (RSVCE) 13 ...


5

James 4:17 states "Anyone, then, who knows the good he ought to do and doesn't do it, sins." (NIV) Adam and Eve knew what they should and shouldn't do. God made it very simple: "but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil." (Gen 2:17 NIV) It was clear that they were to avoid that tree. As James 4:17 states, they knew what to do ...


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In answer to your related question "How did people know right from wrong before the law?", I included the following: There was always a 'law' before it was written on tablets of stone and given to Moses: God sets the standard of righteousness by what remains in accord to His nature and unrighteousness by what constitutes rebellion against His nature. ...


4

The general and simple answer is a yes, but most folks get it backwards. But, the Bible doesn't need to define this in detail for us. It uses terms the Jews were familiar with, terms that we're familiar with. It simply has to say, don't make idols or don't have other gods before me, and we can readily infer the meaning. An idol is simply an image or a form ...


3

There are two different passages in the New Testament, both in Pauline epistles, in which greed is seemingly equated with idolatry. Since the way in which the phrases are translated can affect their meaning, as it applies to this particular context, I'll quote them each in several different versions: Col 3:5 NASB Therefore consider the members of ...


3

I think the following should be added, on the subject of a material sin not being a formal sin if the sinner didn't know that it was wrong. Catholic doctrine distinguishes between "vincible" and "invincible" ignorance. Invincible ignorance means you were ignorant through no fault of your own; you had no way of knowing. The thalidomide example in Matthew's ...


3

Moses did in fact allow divorce, it was not a law only a permission. It was permitted here; Deuteronomy 24:1-4 KJV When a man hath taken a wife, and married her, and it come to pass that she find no favour in his eyes, because he hath found some uncleanness in her: then let him write her a bill of divorcement, and give [it] in her hand, and send her ...


3

God plainly gives Adam only one rule to live by in Genesis 2:16: And the Lord God commanded the man, “You are free to eat from any tree in the garden; but you must not eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, for when you eat from it you will certainly die.” You can clearly see God laying down a very easygoing life for Adam with one simple ...


2

You need to make the distinction between material sin and formal sin. Formal sin (what we usually mean when we just say 'sin') is when there is a bad action and we know it is bad but do it anyway. Our knowledge of the evil is crucial for there being a formal sin. However, we can also be ignorant of the evil in our actions. For example, doctors in the ...


2

If you were told to do something by a figure of authority, you know the correct response: obey authority. If the police lights flash and you are in the car in front, you know what to do. You know that if you keep driving, you will disobey the authorities, even if you don't know exactly what the length of your punishment will be when you're caught. You ...


2

The short answer to your specific question is "No, no such evidence exists." But the question seems to be alluding to the conversation between the Pharisees and Jesus in Matthew 19. In that passage, the Pharisees asked why Moses "commanded" a man to give his wife a certificate of divorce and send her away. In his response, Jesus corrected the terminology ...


2

First, as to the gradation of sin: The Catholic Church recognizes that some sins are "worse" than others. For instance, it divides sins into mortal sins and venial sins (CCC 1854-1855): 1855: Mortal sin destroys charity in the heart of man by a grave violation of God's law; it turns man away from God, who is his ultimate end and his beatitude, by ...


1

Perhaps we can answer all three questions at once: First of all it was not the tree of the knowledge of Evil. It was the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. So if man was unaware of evil he was likewise unaware of good. So in that case even though man had free will he was not confronted with a choice between good or evil. All Scripture is quoted from ...


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God's message to King Saul through prophet Samuel, after Saul disobeys God, is: 1 Samuel 15:22-23 (RSVCE) 22 And Samuel said, “Has the Lord as great delight in burnt offerings and sacrifices, as in obeying the voice of the Lord? Behold, to obey is better than sacrifice, and to hearken than the fat of rams. 23 For rebellion is as the ...


1

Starting with the definition of sin from a Catholic perspective: 113. What is sin? A. Sin is an offense against God [has infinite dignity], by any thought, word, deed or omission against the law of God. cf. Penny Catechism, 113 The reference is God, who is offended by the sinner, when the sinner commits a sin as defined above. So it is the person who ...


1

Genisis 3:5 & 22 - By eating the fruit of the tree of knowledge mankind gained knowledge of good and evil and blessing and calamity. As God knew humanity now had that knowledge, God held mankind accountable. That is the short answer.


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From a specifically Catholic perspective: Even though God had not yet given a law before Moses, humans were still called by God, and searched for God: The dignity of man rests above all on the fact that he is called to communion with God. This invitation to converse with God is addressed to man as soon as he comes into being. (Gaudium et Spes, Vatican ...


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To quote from The Shorter Catechism, A Baptist Version, questions 52-55 are helpful: What is the second commandment? The second commandment is, You shall not make for yourself any carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them ...


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There appears to be some contention here as what Idolatry means so let's see if we can better understand what God meant when he gave the ten Commandments to Moses. From the King James translation: Exodus 20:2 through 5 I am the LORD thy God, which have brought thee out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. Thou shalt have no other gods ...


1

Catholic perspective: always wrong/bad, not always sinful. Self-control Sirach 18:30-31 (RSVCE) 30 Do not follow your base desires, but restrain your appetites. 31 If you allow your soul to take pleasure in base desire, it will make you the laughingstock of your enemies. Pertinent numbers in the Catechism of the Catholic Church: ...


1

If there is an all powerful Creator, why does evil exist? Another way of thinking about it is to consider who initiates wicked actions, which gives two possibilities, Divine responsibility or human culpability. God directs his subjects to commit sins for reasons unknown to us. This is known as predestination. The troubling implication is that we should ...



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