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13

I don't think that we can say for sure. I think that this particular verse could apply to just about any time in history. Rumors of wars could mean any fear of a coming war, including the cold war. In fact most of the things foretold in Matthew 24 have happened since His time - false messiahs, nation rising against nation, famine, pestilence, ...


10

Nothing specific to abortion, although I wouldn't expect there to be. 2 Timothy 3:1-7 gives us:  1 But mark this: There will be terrible times in the last days. 2 People will be lovers of themselves, lovers of money, boastful, proud, abusive, disobedient to their parents, ungrateful, unholy, 3 without love, unforgiving, slanderous, without self-control, ...


4

No. What I think people don't get is that Jesus wasn't saying these things to us. Matthew 24:1 makes it obvious that Jesus was talking to his disciples. "Jesus left the temple and was walking away when his disciples came up to him to call his attention to its buildings." Jesus said "You will hear of wars and rumors of wars..". Not, "People in the future ...


3

First: a translation issue. I am not literate in Greek but I have studied Latin; the Vulgate renders Matt 24:6 as: "audituri autem estis proelia et opiniones proeliorum videte ne turbemini oportet enim haec fieri sed nondum est finis" Notice the noun "bellum, belli" is not in that sentence, but "proelia" (plural form of proelium) which means "battle, combat, ...


2

The idea is based on the following logic: In Exodus we learn that while Israel resided in Egypt under the oppression of the Pharaoh, God planned to bring a deliverer to His people: Moses. However, when Moses was born, Pharaoh had issued a decree to slay the firstborn sons. Moses was spared from this slaughter by the providence of God, and went on to lead ...


2

πολέμους καὶ ἀκοὰς πολέμων Wars and rumours/hearings/rumblings of wars. πολέμους is accusative, masculine plural. Seems like it's the first part of a content (or object) clause of the infinitive ἀκούειν ("to hear"). I guess it could also be indicative, but infinitives can be taken as indicatives when context allows. πολέμους and ἀκοὰς are both the same ...


2

The ESV (among others) still uses "rumors": Matthew 24:6 (ESV) 6 And you will hear of wars and rumors of wars. See that you are not alarmed, for this must take place, but the end is not yet. As you probably know, texts such as this are very controversial among Bible scholars. In relation to this passage, there are four main views: ...



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