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7

One argument of the Christian presuppositional apologists is that only the Bible is self-authenticating. Other sacred texts, like the Quran, are not. Consider the way Ten Bruggencate's tract on Islam addresses the issue. To Muslims who claim that they could not be wrong, he presents "contradictions in [their] source of knowledge"; that is, he claims that ...


4

Are you referring to anything specifically? If you can provide a specific instance, that might be more informative. In short: the answers are: Nullify, no. Takes precedence, yes. For example, polygamy is an eternal law. And although it is not practiced today, it has been practiced as noted in the Bible (Genesis 16:3; 25:1; 29:21-30; 30:3-4, 9), spoken ...


3

The question is: Did the NT writers themselves know that they were writing an inspired record? Though there is at least one major exception, which is mentioned below, for the most part the New Testament authors simply wrote their accounts without commenting on whether they were inspired. We can therefore glean only a few clues here and there about ...


2

I believe Adam Clark is correct when in his commentary he says, "This sentence is not well translated; the original - πασα γραφη θεοκνευστος ωφιλιμος προς διδασκαλιαν, κ. τ. λ. should be rendered: Every writing Divinely inspired is profitable for doctrine, etc." Notice there is no "is" between writing and Divinely inspired (or God-breathed) in any greek ...


1

There are 5 verses missing from the Masoretic Text that give some more background on Job: And Job died, an old man and full of days: and it is written that he will rise again with those whom the Lord raises up. This man is described in the Syriac book as living in the land of Ausis, on the borders of Idumea and Arabia: and his name before was Jobab; ...


1

As to your question regarding origins, we do not know the author or the means of revelation of the book of Job. What we do know is that there is an ancient tradition including the book in Hebrew scripture. The book makes no reference to the patriarchs or the law or the prophets but it is consistent with teachings therein and is commonly considered to ...


1

There are suggestions that Uz is in central Syria, north of Israel, because of a genealogy in Genesis 10:23, but hard evidence for its location is not so readily available. Reference to attacks by Chaldeans (Job 1:17) would normally place the location of Uz to the east of Palestine, but reference to the Sabaeans would probably place its location in southern ...


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First of all, the title doesn't really match the question body. I suppose what you mean is something along the lines "God commanded X earlier, now he wants you to do Z instead."?! There are multiple mentions of revoking an earlier command in D&C, for example: D&C 58:31-33 31 Who am I, saith the Lord, that have promised and have not fulfilled? ...


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The four New Testament gospels were all written anonymously, so in spite of second-century attributions to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, we do not really know who wrote them and therefore they can not tell us whether they believed their gospels were divinely inspired. The gospels, as a genre, are narrated by third-party, omniscient narrators who are ...



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