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7

One argument of the Christian presuppositional apologists is that only the Bible is self-authenticating. Other sacred texts, like the Quran, are not. Consider the way Ten Bruggencate's tract on Islam addresses the issue. To Muslims who claim that they could not be wrong, he presents "contradictions in [their] source of knowledge"; that is, he claims that ...


4

Short Answer: Over the course of 7 years by a committee of Apostles, Oxford Scholars, professional editors, computer experts, and many other contributers form both inside and outside the Church. What we have for footnotes in the standard works today is the result of many lifetimes worth of diligent scripture study, and thousands of hours work completed as ...


3

With regard to "Who kept them?" and "how did a common person obtain access to them in Christ's time?", a bit of information can be gleaned from the Bible itself, in Luke 4: Luke 4:14-21 (NIV) 14 Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news about him spread through the whole countryside. 15 He was teaching in their synagogues, and ...


3

Well, obviously, many of the specifics are simply unknowable, but written texts were obviously kept and transmitted by various religious communities in antiquity. One particularly anachronistic component to your question, however, is the notion that the scriptures or Bible were "a" scroll. You simply couldn't fit several long texts (e.g. the entirety of the ...


3

The question is: Did the NT writers themselves know that they were writing an inspired record? Though there is at least one major exception, which is mentioned below, for the most part the New Testament authors simply wrote their accounts without commenting on whether they were inspired. We can therefore glean only a few clues here and there about ...


1

The four New Testament gospels were all written anonymously, so in spite of second-century attributions to Matthew, Mark, Luke and John, we do not really know who wrote them and therefore they can not tell us whether they believed their gospels were divinely inspired. The gospels, as a genre, are narrated by third-party, omniscient narrators who are ...


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This is the best I could find for you. Boyd K. Packer, 1982 https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1982/10/scriptures?lang=eng ... All of the problems mentioned so far related only to the printing part of the project. The actual compiling and organizing of the tens of thousands of footnotes would require many hundreds of workers. This work had ...


1

The incarnate word of God is a person named Jesus. The written word of God, inspired by the Spirit, is generally identified as a book named the Bible. There are debates over what should be considered inspired, but there's also a common core. They seem to me to have completely different natures, and so are very easy to distinguish.


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I am LDS and this is the first time I have heard of this 'doctrine'. I think I see where the confusion comes from. Narnian is correct that we talk about Adam in the temple. But we do not consider him a God. But rather Mormonism believes that we all have the potential be Gods and create worlds and have spirit children. Considering that we believe that Adam ...



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