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The early church did indeed apply this language to specific cases, particularly in relation to God's judgment and church discipline. For example, Chrysostom describes Judas and Job as being "delivered to Satan," and says: Many such instances still occur. For since the Priests cannot know who are sinners, and unworthy partakers of the holy Mysteries, ...


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As you have rightly said the number one third comes from the Revelation. And that alone is solid Biblical support, since this was referring to a past event, and not prophesy. There is an erroneous, but widely accepted belief that the Revelation is all prophesy, but this verse tells us that this is not true: Revelation 1:19 KJV Write the things which ...


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This is a long answer. Please bear with me. I’m not sure how old this idea is, but its a combination of mistakes in interpretation. We always come into difficulties when we take any document out of context. The same is especially true for the Bible. That is what happens here and when done in several different bible passages, it leads to some man-made idea ...


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A most definite no. Satan does not have the power to create; only God does. Theologians for centuries have been using the phrase ex nihilo to describe God's creative activities. That saying is fine as far as it goes, but I suggest that a better expression than "God created all things out of nothing" is God created all things out of the fullness of his ...



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