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28

Matthew Henry Explains this passage with the following in his Commentary: Some make the slain bird to typify Christ dying for our sins, and the living bird Christ rising again for our justification. The dipping of the living bird in the blood of the slain bird intimated that the merit of Christ's death was that which made his resurrection effectual for ...


13

This lamentation/complaint against Israel's wickedness and their practices of sacrifice is interesting because it is not only found in Isaiah 66 (the last chapter) but also in Isaiah 1: 3 The ox knoweth his owner, and the ass his master's crib: but Israel doth not know, my people doth not consider. 4 Ah sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, ...


12

Jesus died for our sins What we (and the Bible) mean by the phrase "Jesus died for our sins" is that all sins have a penalty. We see the same thing in the justice systems of nations--for every crime, there is a penalty. When the penalty is paid, we say that justice has been served, and that's a good thing. Our sins are really rebellion against God, and ...


11

According to this article, there are local churches in Israel that still practice animal sacrifice. It says: Although slaughter for sacrifice contradicts a basic belief of Christianity, it is practiced by local Catholics, Greek Orthodox and other Christians at the ruined Byzantine church of Saint George in the village of Taybeh, 20 miles from Jerusalem. ...


10

Hebrews 10:1 (KJV) For the law having a shadow of good things to come, and not the very image of the things, can never with those sacrifices which they offered year by year continually make the comers thereunto perfect. I think you can say from Hebrews 10 that the Old Testament sacrifices were a picture of Christ's sacrifice more than that his death ...


10

One interpretation is that Cain's offering was not selective but Abel's offering was of the best ("fat portions") of the special ("firstlings"). Under this interpretation, Abel considered God well worthy of special honor (which tends to be associated with love), while Cain may have viewed the sacrifice more as something to be done, an expected action that ...


8

This is an odd passage, since, as you noted, he would certainly have known his household. Also, the Law of Moses strictly forbade human sacrifice, particularly the sacrifice of one's own children, categorizing it as an abomination before the Lord, so such an offering would never have been acceptable to God anyway. It's interesting to note that the mourning ...


8

Premise We cannot conclusively say that Adam and Eve performed the any sacrifices, but the evidence is very heavy that they did and it was ordained by God and likely that He instructed them in it or even did the first one Himself. It is definitely clear that sacrifice was instituted very early. Abel and Cain apparently performed sacrifices, Abel ...


8

I think Philippians chapter 2 shares some good light on this: 5 ...Christ Jesus, 6 Who, existing in the form of God, did not consider being equal with God a treasure to be grasped, 7 But emptied Himself, taking the form of a slave, becoming in the likeness of men; 8 And being found in fashion as a man, He humbled Himself, becoming obedient even unto ...


7

According to several sermons I've heard, the first animal sacrifice was recorded in Genesis 3:21 (KJV). Unto Adam also and to his wife did the Lord God make coats of skins, and clothed them. He used the skin of some animal to cover their nakedness. One source for such a teaching is at Sermoncentral.com. The First Sacrifice is recorded in ...


7

Simple, there was no blood. You see, without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sin. (Heb 9:21). Do you know what the first sacrifice was? It was actually an animal. It was performed by God himself who clothed (covered) Adam and Eve with its skin/fur after they sinned. God showed and taught Adam and Eve about the sacrifice. I have no doubt ...


7

Hebrews 9:22 answers this question definitely: Indeed, under the law almost everything is purified with blood, and without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins. (ESV) The author of Hebrews goes on from this verse to say that the spiritual things needed to be purified with greater sacrifices than that of animals, and pointed to the ...


6

That's a very good question. Clearly there are a lot of details missing from the earliest parts of the narrative. Remember that Genesis is traditionally attributed to Moses, who led the Israelites out of Egypt and gave them the Law of Moses. Storytellers tend to explain unfamiliar concepts and not waste time explaining familiar ones, so it's reasonable to ...


6

The history of the proper locations for offering sacrifices under the Old Testament is like this. First before Moses sacrifices could be made anywhere. Then once the tabernacle was built, Moses received the command of the Lord that sacrifices could only be brought to the “entrance of the tent of meeting” per Lev 17: 2 “Speak to Aaron and his sons ...


6

I find that with blood all things are made clean. In the temple everything including the people were sprinkled with blood. In Egypt, blood was placed upon the door posts to divert the death angel. The clothing of Adam and Eve supplied by God were skins and the offering of Abel was the fat thereof which came form his lambs. It is without a doubt that the most ...


6

Part of the answer can be found in Colossians 1:24. Now I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ's afflictions for the sake of his body, that is, the Church. The question a Christian must answer is, "What is lacking in Christ's afflictions?" I think most would agree that nothing at all is lacking, ...


5

I don't think Pascal intended the Wager to be pulled from Pensées and used as an independent, discrete argument for God. But don't take my word for it, here's what the man says himself: Let us now speak according to natural lights. If there is a God, He is infinitely incomprehensible, since, having neither parts nor limits, He has no affinity to ...


5

The Armenian Orthodox Church has practiced animal sacrifice since its inception in 301 AD and still does until this day. It is referred to as Matagh and performed outside of the church on holy days such as Easter or to ask for forgiveness. The practice was instituted by St. Gregory the Illuminator in his efforts to convert pagans, so it is an example of ...


5

There were two main meanings to this. The first was as a symbol of Christ, whose blood makes it possible for everyone to have their sins forgiven. The second is as a sacrifice in the more traditional sense: willingly giving up something important and valuable. And when your animals are both your livelihood and the food on your family's table, giving the ...


5

I have questioned this for a while. Many believe that the coats of skin represent a sacrifice done by God for Adam and Eve's sin. Nelson's New Illustrated bible Dictionary makes a statement concerning this that has brought a question up to me about it. I shall type the quote and give reference to the page now: This is located on page 1109 under the topic of ...


4

Such a belief is clearly expressed in both Genesis and Leviticus. Genesis 9:4 But flesh with the life thereof, which is the blood thereof, shall ye not eat. Leviticus 17:11-14 11 For the life of the flesh is in the blood: and I have given it to you upon the altar to make an atonement for your souls: for it is the blood that maketh an ...


4

Also keep in mind that, In 586 BC, the Babylonians destroyed Jerusalem and Solomon's Temple. There is no record of what became of the Ark. [source] So most likely in Jesus' day the ark was not in the temple. Revelations 11:19 Then, in heaven, the Temple of God was opened and the Ark of his covenant could be seen inside the Temple I'm not trying ...


4

We have Scripture by which we can test these revelations. “The prophet who has a dream, let him tell a dream; And he who has My word, let him speak My word faithfully. What is the chaff to the wheat?” says the Lord. “Is not My word like a fire?” says the Lord, “And like a hammer that breaks the rock in pieces? (Jeremiah 23:28-29) God calls ...


4

The sacrifice of Jesus was many things. It was a personal atonement for our sins, bringing salvation. But it is much, much more than only that. It was a propitiation. God's wrath was/is hot upon the human race, his sacrifice was a shedding of innocent blood to put away that wrath. It was for us, but it was directed toward God. God required innocent blood, ...


4

"If you correctly identify the characters"; by characters I suppose you mean actors rather than Hebrew letters, since your argument appears to be that Jehovah (i.e. YHWH) and Elohim (which you spell Alueim) are two different beings, and further according to your theory it was Elohim and not Jehovah who spoke to Abraham. That this is clearly not the case is ...


4

How did Jesus' death on the cross turned out to become a sacrifice to redeem sins? While the Roman execution was taking place, there were other elements not as noticeable. Jesus allowed himself to be put to death. John 10:17-18 Therefore doth my Father love me, because I lay down my life, that I might take it again. No man taketh it from me, but ...


4

The most obvious answer is Jesus' words to his disciples at the Last Supper, in Matthew's version: this is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed on behalf of many for the forgiveness of sins. (Matthew 26:28, New American Bible Revised Edition)


4

Yes, Samuel took over as high priest of the Shiloh sanctuary after the previous high priest Eli and his two sons Hophni and Phineas all died on the same day (1 Samuel 4:11-18), even though his father was an Ephraimite (1:1). One example of his priestly activities is described in 7:5-10. How could this be since he wasn't a descendant of Aaron? The most ...


4

Pay close attention to the words and what they are referring to here: 1 Samuel 1:1 There was a certain man of Ramathaim-zophim of the hill country of Ephraim whose name was Elkanah the son of Jeroham, son of Elihu, son of Tohu, son of Zuph, an Ephrathite. Samuel, and even his father, were not Ephrathites, for Ephrathites were generally Judahites. ...



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