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Lutherans do not generally use the term consubstantiation. Nor do they use the term impanation. Impanation, by analogy to the Incarnation, would imply some kind of hypostatic union between the bread and Christ (just as between the human and divine natures in Christ), which is explicitly rejected by the Solid Declaration of the Formula of Concord (6.38). The ...


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This is a bad question because there is too much diversity of belief to say that there is a single "Protestant" view of sacraments. Some Protestants, notably the Salvation Army, do not even practice sacraments. On the other hand, there are some Protestants, especially in certain corners of Anglicanism who have essentially the same beliefs as Catholics. ...


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The Purpose of the sacrmanents in the Protestant view -- I would specifically answer from a Born Again Christian view point. First of all, Born Again Christians do not believe that the sacraments --the Eucharist and Water Baptism -- have graces that saves/cleanses/justifies someone from any sin. The Lord's Table Born Again Christians believe that the ...


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The sacrament wouldn't be confected because that requires form, matter and intention and the matter is missing in your scenario. Denzinger 695 from the Bull "Exultate Deo," Nov. 22, 1439 "All these sacraments are dispensed in three ways, namely, by things as the matter, by words as the form, and by the person of the minister conferring the sacrament with ...


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Although the triple pouring is required for lawful baptism in the Western Rites of the Catholic church, it does not seem to be required for validity. (Source: "Moral Theology" by Fr. Heribert Jone, a book that was recommended to me by a traditional Catholic priest, and which I therefore consider reliable.) So if one or even two of the pourings miss the ...


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I am not a canon lawyer, and do not play one on the internet, but a quick review of the relevant bits of the catechism and code of canon law suggests to me that the baptism is valid, even if it can be actually proved one of the instances of pouring water really did miss completely, because the intent to perform the sacrament is there, and the frailty of the ...



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