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15

There is no precedent for infant baptism in Scripture Infant baptism simply is not found in the Bible. That isn't an argument that it can't be done, but it should be seen as an extrabiblical tradition. Baptism is commanded with salvation Jesus commanded the apostles as follows: Matthew 28:19 (NIV) 19  Therefore go and make disciples of all ...


14

Preface, this is a Protestant response. I'm not arguing the validity of it, or any claims here, just answering the question. the short Protestant response would be "Meh". A general Protestant response to each point would be: 1) Where in Scripture does it say there would be any such thing as Apostolic succession? The New Testament speaks of several ...


10

I think part of the problem with baptism discussions is that they are often mis-characterized as "adult" baptisms and "infant" baptisms, when really, the crux of disagreement is in the significance of the baptism rather than the age of its recipient. (baptism based on repentance vs. baptism as a covenental birthright) I know you clarify this in your ...


10

One aspect I don't see addressed in other posts is the significance of bread and wine. Yes, it's because that's what Jesus said to do, but he did not merely pick to random substances to represent himself. Although I would argue that John 6 does not have sacramental overtones in mind per se, we do see Jesus using bread to represent himself. A couple of ...


9

This is the analogy that Jesus chose at his last supper. Matt 26:26-29 (NIV) 26 While they were eating, Jesus took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it and gave it to his disciples, saying, “Take and eat; this is my body.” 27 Then he took a cup, and when he had given thanks, he gave it to them, saying, “Drink from it, all of you. 28 ...


8

Communion with bread and wine is common in most Christian denominations, although it can mean different things to different denominations (see What do different denominations mean when they talk about the Real Presence in the Eucharist?). The bread and wine are from the Last Supper. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Last_Supper The Last Supper is the final ...


8

Per @awe and @Jamess, there are really two sides of this. It can go either way. Are you breaking your fast? Yes. You truly are. But you have to question: Why am I fasting? If you are fasting in order to grow closer to God and find reliance only on him, then taking communion would not necessarily be bad. Since communion is meant to draw us to God, ...


8

Yes, wine was most likely used by Jesus during the Last Supper, just as the cups in the Passover Feast are typically wine in today's observances. Yet, there is not prescriptive command to use wine nor is there any prohibitive command against using grape juice. If this were a significant issue, then it is reasonable to assume that the Bible would contain ...


8

Abstract Protestants do perform many of the rites that the Catholic church considers Sacraments, but only two, Baptism and Communion, are considered Sacraments by the majority of Protestants. These two are the only two rites that are conducted using the formula given to us by Jesus. Luther, as is usual, took the first step: We have now finished the ...


7

I think @DavidStratton's answer takes a good "root cause" approach but I'd like to look at the surface of things a bit as well. I noted in my comment above that protestant baptisms and marriages are not categorically rejected by the Catholic Church so I'll just focus on communion. There are three main reasons why Catholics wouldn't receive communion from ...


7

The earliest recorded formulation of the Lord's Supper reads: For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus on the night when he was betrayed took bread, and when he had given thanks, he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance of me.” In the same way also he took the cup, after ...


7

The Catholic Church teaches that man's sins may be absolved by the Church. Absolution from sin means "To free from sin", which is pretty much the same as forgiveness of sins. In lay-person's terms, as I understand it, the Priest is acting under the authority and power of the Church, which, in turn, is acting under the authority and power of Christ. This ...


7

The LDS church proscribes wine (or any alcoholic beverage, really), so water is used instead, although it doesn't matter what is used for the symbols of the sacrament, according to Doctrine and Covenants in the LDS canon: D&C 27:2 2 For, behold, I say unto you, that it mattereth not what ye shall eat or what ye shall drink when ye partake of the ...


7

How do practicing Catholics keep track of all the sins they commit before going to Confession? They don't keep track of sins. Before going to confession they do something called examination of conscience. This is in layman term trying to recall all the sin one has committed. An examination of conscience is a “prayerful self-reflection on our words and ...


7

Baptismal certificates are still used by Churches for whom Trinitarian baptism is important. This is so that they can be certain that someone has been validly baptised. The Catholic, Anglican and Orthodox Churches recognise each other’s baptisms and those of many other denominations as a valid, once-for-all and transferable sacrament. But it can only be ...


6

Asking "What do Protestants think about the sacraments?" is a bit misleading. There are a large variety of Protestant views, some of them are more traditional than others. The question as to whether Protestant groups are wholly divorced from the Apostolic succession is also not 100% correct. There are a few clearly Protestant groups who have at least some ...


6

Marriage was the proto-sacrament. It became a sacrament after Christ came. Eucharist was the second. It first appeared on Maundy Thursday. Baptism is ambiguous. The baptism of John was not sacramental. I believe that it became a sacrament after the resurrection. Ordination can be seen between the resurrection and Thomas's acceptance of that fact. It can ...


6

(Although I can't speak for all Presbyterians, as we are diverse bunch, I think that what I say here is representative of the mainstream. I welcome correction if I am wrong about this.) When Communion is served, we do use a table of some kind. The table recalls the Last Supper, at which the practice of Communion was instituted; Matthew 26:20, Mark 14:18, ...


6

Many years ago, before governments were in the habit of providing live birth documentation and proof of identity, a baptismal certificate was valid proof of citizenship. Because people didn't move around, churches took upon themselves the responsibility to know the souls in their area, and kept register of the same. For the previous generation, where not ...


5

I would say it is not valid. The wine at the Last Supper — Jesus' Passover celebration — was fermented because that was the tradition. It was an oral tradition later codified in the Mishnah, but it was still what Christ did, so it should be when we Do this in remembrance. It's not simply an act, it's a re-creation. I can see that the theology of ...


5

Communion is always "valid under both species" as Catholics would say. That means that if you only receive Jesus under the form of wine or under the form of bread, you're receiving the whole of God. For about 20 years or so (depending where you live) in much of North America it has been common practice to offer the cup to the laity at communion for all ...


5

It is tied to the Sacrament, if you take a look at the rules for obtaining an annulment (which declares that a sacramental union does not exist). One of the acceptable cases to have an annulment granted is if consummation never took place.


5

The Sacrament of Baptism is often called "The door of the Church" because it is considered the first of the seven sacraments. According to Catholic Catechism (1212), the Catholic Church sees baptism as the first and basic sacrament of Christian initiation. For most Christians and especially Catholics, baptism is the first sacrament received (often as an ...


4

Remarriage is not necessary. The Catholic Church recognizes a Christian marriage as sacramental and indissoluble unless there was something that made it invalid. Catholic communion is radically different from Protestant communion since it is the actual body of Christ. Protestants only believe communion is symbolic. Also, Protestant communion is not the ...


4

The discipline of fasting is a time of introspection on God by forsaking some of the human need (here food) for a period. Communion is a time of fellowship with God in community. I believe we should follow the spirit of Bible, which is expressed in 2 Corinthians 3:6 last part (for the letter kills, but the Spirit gives life. quoted from NIV). Jesus always ...


4

I believe that @Justin Y's answer to an earlier question of mine has the key to the answer to your question as well. My question was "What is the doctrinal or Scriptural basis for a central Church authority" In his answer, Justin stated this: A central church authority is a necessary byproduct of believing that certain ordinances are necessary for ...


4

I had the same thoughts you did until I understood Luther more.  The thing with Luther is that he most certainly believed you are saved by faith only and that even baptism was not necessary. Having said that he puts such weight on Baptism that it almost seems that 'if there was anything needed beyond faith' baptism would be it.  You must not blame Luther for ...


4

Let me preface this with a note that the view I present does not think it serious to hold a more traditional view. Unity on other matters make this subject peripheral. Another common view is among popular evangelicalism that would not try to defend their emphasis on the sacraments, but oppose an over emphasis by others. From their view the need for any kind ...


4

It would make a huge difference. First of all, neither Bill nor Martha is Catholic or ever has been, so they are not subject to canon law in either the negative or the positive sense. Neither of them is a valid minister of the sacrament of matrimony -- that is to say, it is not possible for them to contract a sacramental marriage. Objectively speaking, an ...


4

Full Disclaimer: I am an Eastern Orthodox Christian who is a former Protestant Christian. I have addressed how Protestants might respond to these points, with the understanding that Protestants are a very broad group with many differing beliefs on these issues. With that said, these responses must necessarily be broad and somewhat varied. According to ...



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