Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

6

In this passage Paul is quoting from Psalm 32. The King James Version in both cases uses derivatives of the verb to impute. However, other well-respected more modern versions of the Bible do not translate it this way e.g. the NIV or the NRSV. There is a less common meaning of the word impute meaning "to assign a value to" which is used in finance. In this ...


5

Romans 1:21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and ...


4

Seventh Day Adventists do not view Romans‬ ‭14‬:‭5‬ to be about the 4th commandment. We do not believe that the ten commandments (God's moral laws) were abolished at the cross. The law of love would cause Christians to want to keep God's moral laws through grace (i.e. not murder, not commit adultery), it does not free them to then freely murder. The same ...


4

Good question. Similarly, an earlier verse seems diminish the importance of the Seventh Day Adventists' distinctive belief in vegetarianism. For instance, one person believes it’s all right to eat anything. But another believer with a sensitive conscience will eat only vegetables. ...those who don’t eat certain foods must not condemn those who do, for ...


4

In the first place: the pronoun "they" in Romans 1:27 does not refer to the Romans reading the letter, nor necessarily to anyone they knew. It refers back to the group described in Romans 1:18 as those who suppress the truth by their wickedness These may or may not have been actual specific persons; the New American Bible (the standard Bible to be used ...


3

I think most commentators have understood "terror to good conduct" a little differently than you are understanding it. The phrase is φόβος τῷ ἀγαθῷ ἔργῳ (phobos tō agathō ergō) — literally, "fear [to] the good work". This is nonsensical English, so the ESV has used "terror", which works. I think the idea they intend convey, though, is made more ...


2

all Israel will be saved The phrase above lends itself to several possibilities. Every descendant of Jacob will eventually end up in heaven. All those of Israel who were "blinded" will be saved. Israel is a metaphor for all those of faith who are Abraham's children. The Israel that will be saved is the faithful remnant that remains at the end of the ...


2

There are three principal interpretations of this passage among Protestants and Catholics. "All Israel" might refer to: A future large-scale conversion of Jewish people to Christianity All the Jewish people elected by God All the people of God, both Gentiles and Jews The first of these views is easily the most popular, and is widely held by ...


2

What you see is narrowness and broadness, so you see the two passages as contradictory. But if we look at their details, we see that they have nothing to do with each other. Jesus is talking about destruction, roads, and gates while Paul is talking about days and food. Jesus is using roads and gates figuratively while Paul is talking about days and food ...


2

How is “every man be fully persuaded in his own mind” not contradictory to the “narrow is the way leading to life”? The Romans verse in context is referring to disputes between Christians. The "narrow way" refers to those from the population at large who have become Christian. Even the nation of Israel had the problem of the "broad way" that leads to ...


2

The unfaithfulness of the Jews in no way hinders or nullifies God's promises to Abraham and his seed. "What I am saying is this: the Law, which came four hundred and thirty years later, does not invalidate a covenant previously ratified by God, so as to nullify the promise." (Galatians 3:17 NASB) Despite their unfaithfulness, God has confirmed and ...


2

Many interpret it in light of the rest of the larger section, Romans 9-11, which indicates that Paul's language of election is about Jews and Gentiles. In fact, cutting off that section at verse 23 is quite artificial, and even the Reformed-leaning ESV translation groups 9:1-29 into a single pericope. On this interpretation, election is not a choice by God ...


1

Does the Bible tell us what the phrase “times of the Gentiles” or "fullness of Gentiles" means? Often the Bible says something that offers a glimpse of something that raises many more questions than it answers. Luke 21:20-24 And when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with armies, then know that the desolation thereof is nigh. Then let them which ...


1

In Romans 3:1-8, what is God being faithful towards? The faithfulness of God is more about his constancy that his word is trustworthy and his promises absolute. Even Einstein caught a part of this when he said that he believed in the God of Spinoza that made himself manifest in the harmony of nature. Which words and which judging is referred to? ...


1

Paul refers to “the saints” many times in his writings. The clearest definition of a saint is found in his salutation at the beginning of 1 Corinthians: 1 Paul, called to be an apostle of Jesus Christ through the will of God, and Sosthenes our brother, 2 Unto the church of God which is at Corinth, to them that are sanctified in Christ Jesus, called ...


1

"If we interpret it as referring to all rulers at all times this statement does not seem to agree with reality." Absolutely right, it does not. And that's your first clue that the statement doesn't mean that. It means rulers in general "are not a terror to good conduct, but to bad". Talking in the general like that was perfectly normal and would have ...


1

First off: knowing this first: that no prophecy of the Scripture is of any private interpretation. (2 Peter 1:20) I would not hinge your belief on such a hotly debated topic based on the way prominent theologians interpret it. We can understand the Word ourselves: by which, when you read, you may understand my knowledge in the mystery of Christ ...


1

This question reminds me of the "felix culpa" ("happy fault [of Adam]")¹ question of whether Christ would have become incarnate had Adam not sinned. If Adam had not sinned, how could've God worked greater goods? Similarly in the case of the fall of the Jews: If the Jews had not fallen, how could there be "the salvation of the Gentiles by means of the death ...


1

Romans 4:8 Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin. "impute" = logizomai = to take an inventory, that is, estimate (literally or figuratively): - conclude, number, reason, reckon, suppose Alternate translations; Weust - Spiritually prosperous is the man to whose account the Lord does not in any case put sin. Amplified - Blessed and ...


1

This is basically a very poetic way to say; "Blessed is the man who is saved by God's Grace." Paul is teaching the Romans about the Grace of God. In chapters 4-8, Paul uses Abraham as an example to show that individuals were not justified through obedience to the law of Moses—they were justified through faith in God’s promises. Since Abraham lived centuries ...


1

One way is through the Framework view of Genesis. This is in contrast to the Gap and Day-Age theories of Genesis. This view puts forth a literal reading of Genesis, while maintaining that the account of Genesis is not what actually occurred. This view is more concerned with Genesis from a theological and spiritual viewpoint than a journalistic one. The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible