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13

Death through Sin The idea of "death through sin" in Romans 5:12 refers to Genesis 2:17, where God warns Adam not to eat the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil. The NIV translation of Genesis 2:17 is questionable, so I'm offering four other translations, because the wording is important for understanding the passage: but of the tree of the ...


11

If Jesus said He was not sent except to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, then that is certainly true. If we don't accept Jesus' own words as true, then it would be difficult to imagine what the qualifications for acceptance would be. So, yes, Jesus was sent to the lost sheep of the house of Israel. That does not mean, however, that Jesus, the ...


10

It simply means that Christ is uniquely special to God and has his authority. To sit at the right hand of an earthly king was a place of honor, denoting special trust, authority from, and relationship with the king. It was something that was understood without needing explanation at the time. If you were to sit at the right hand of the King meant that ...


10

Yes and no. Yes he added it, no it is not the atrocity that it necessarily implies. Part of Luther's defense of the translation is that inclusion of the word "alone" is more grammatically correct than its exclusion. While I'm not an expert in German, I do speak enough of it to know that he does have a point. His problem, though, is in the interpretation of ...


9

The John Owen who translated many of John Calvin's works was the Vicar of Thrussington, Leicestershire. OWEN , JOHN ( 1788 - 1867 ), cleric and author ; son of Owen and Eleanor Owen , Cilirwysg , Llanfihangel Ystrad, Cards. The parents were Calvinistic Methodists but two of their sons took orders — John Owen and David Owen (for the latter see Yr Haul , ...


8

The correct understanding of this term is so fundamental in understanding the reformation. It certainly has nothing to do with linguistics or translations. It has everything to do with the doctrine of justification. There are only two sides to the issue. Catholics (and I believe Eastern Orthodox and the Syrian Churches) do not believe in a momentary or ...


8

The story of the Syro-Phoenician woman (Matthew 15 & Mark 7) is interesting in that it specifically is addressing the question of whether or not Jesus was sent to the Jews only, or to all mankind. A few backdrops In Genesis 12, God tells Abraham that he will make of Abraham a great nation (obvious assumption = Israel), but more importantly, that all ...


8

Lazarus and others died of the "first death" and were raised back to the same earthly body as before they died. Their ultimate fate was still to be determined, be it everlasting life or the "second death" on judgement day. Jesus died of the "second death" to pay the penalty of death for believers. He was raised up in full glory as a conquerer, and it is ...


7

There is a difference between condemning and being discerning. One is using the good judgement God gave you, the other is judging in the place of God. It should be clear that Christians are supposed to be "as wise as serpents but as gentle as lambs. ". Throughout the NT, we are warned to avoid false teachers and cast them out of our midst. We are to ...


7

Yes, if you read "because" as indicating a causal relationship, no if it's just giving the reason or purpose. "Because of our justification" might suggest that some action done by us is the cause of the resurrection. That's a problem for Reformed theology, and probably not just for us either, as it's a bit logically and temporally difficult. If we read ...


7

The passage was written after his conversion, and there is no indication whatsoever that Paul was speaking in the past tense. Therefore, following the basic rules of interpretation, (particularly #3, 5, and 8) he is speaking about after he was saved. Those eight rules are copied from the Apologetics Research page below: 1 The rule of DEFINITION: ...


6

Apologize for he length, the question is so good that I am answering not just for you but digging up worthy references for myself. A good place to start for an evangelical answer is with two evangelical theologians famous for having an acute sense of the sinfulness of man and the nature of God's grace in the Christian. John Owen and Jonathan Edwards both ...


6

That little word in is packed with profundity, significance, and comfort for believers in Jesus Christ. One way of approaching this little word is via one of the many names for the Church Universal: the Body of Christ. A body, of course, is composed of many parts (viz., appendages and external and internal organs), and so it is with Christ's body, the ...


6

In this passage Paul is quoting from Psalm 32. The King James Version in both cases uses derivatives of the verb to impute. However, other well-respected more modern versions of the Bible do not translate it this way e.g. the NIV or the NRSV. There is a less common meaning of the word impute meaning "to assign a value to" which is used in finance. In this ...


5

Billy Graham told a story about a minister friend of his. This minister spoke to a Chinese man who had just emigrated to the USA. He had never heard of Jesus. The minister told him the whole story. At the end of the story, the Chinese man began to cry. "Why are you crying?" said the minister... "Because all of my life I have known HIM inside me but I ...


5

You seem to have a basic confusion over who are the ‘good people’ in the Bible. The Bible declares all are equally bound up under sin and are equally guilty before God. Therefore, all require salvation by Christ who personally died for the penalty of their sin. In this sense the more wicked you are, the greater candidate you are for Christianity. The blood ...


5

Besides David Stratton's comment, in Philippians 3, Paul plainly confesses he is not yet perfect: "Not that I have already obtained this or am already perfect..." (v12). And, what it the "this" that he has not obtained? It seems to be "the righteousness from God that depends on faith" (v9). Paul admits he still has progress to make. Thus, he continues ...


5

This question is to me is one of the top 10 all time questions that needs to be settled in order to have a correct view of the gospel and its application to our lives. Although possibly a minority, there have been several commentators who have assumed that Paul is taking about a sinner throughout this chapter and not a believer. In fact, when reviewing a ...


5

Romans 1:21 For although they knew God, they neither glorified him as God nor gave thanks to him, but their thinking became futile and their foolish hearts were darkened. 22 Although they claimed to be wise, they became fools 23 and exchanged the glory of the immortal God for images made to look like a mortal human being and birds and animals and ...


5

Good question. Similarly, an earlier verse seems diminish the importance of the Seventh Day Adventists' distinctive belief in vegetarianism. For instance, one person believes it’s all right to eat anything. But another believer with a sensitive conscience will eat only vegetables. ...those who don’t eat certain foods must not condemn those who do, for ...


5

In the first place: the pronoun "they" in Romans 1:27 does not refer to the Romans reading the letter, nor necessarily to anyone they knew. It refers back to the group described in Romans 1:18 as those who suppress the truth by their wickedness These may or may not have been actual specific persons; the New American Bible (the standard Bible to be used ...


5

In essence, the Catholic Church takes the position that Paul is not intending to attribute actual sin to every human being that has ever existed. For the benefit of readers not familiar with the Catholic doctrine on sin, the Church distinguishes between actual sin (sometimes also called personal sin), which consists in concrete actions in which a person ...


4

I can only answer for my denomination (Baptist), but it was used as a supporting scripture for Immersion. During baptism, pastors would often say Buried in the likeness of His death, raised in the likeness of His resurrection or ...raised to walk in newness of life The idea is that baptism is a the believer's public confession of faith. And the ...


4

Not my personal position, but the Catholic position is "yes, they're OK as long as they behave", recorded in Lumen Gentium (Second Vatican Council, 1964) - emphasis is mine: Nor is God far distant from those who in shadows and images seek the unknown God, for it is He who gives to all men life and breath and all things, and as Saviour wills that all men ...


4

Jesus and others in the Bible have used day and night figuratively. In general, light and day refer to positive aspects of a believer's relationship with God while darkness and night refer to more sinful aspects. For instance, in John 3:19-21, we read, 19 This is the verdict: Light has come into the world, but people loved darkness instead of light ...


4

No. The Pilate of John 18:28 was the Roman procurator of Judea in Jesus' day. Pilate was the civil authority who thought he had the power to turn Jesus over to the Jews to be crucified. A procurator was any of various imperial officials with fiscal or administrative powers. The equivalent today might be a governor. Regarding the "nobleman" in John 4:46-54, ...


4

All of Romans 9-11 should be read together. Paul was responding to the accusation that God's promises to Israel had failed, and his response is basically: "you misunderstand what God means by 'Israel'; it is only the remnant of Israel's natural descendants that count as 'Israel', so actually, all Israel will be saved and God's promises have not failed".


4

Seventh Day Adventists do not view Romans‬ ‭14‬:‭5‬ to be about the 4th commandment. We do not believe that the ten commandments (God's moral laws) were abolished at the cross. The law of love would cause Christians to want to keep God's moral laws through grace (i.e. not murder, not commit adultery), it does not free them to then freely murder. The same ...


4

Christ was raised in a glorified, or spiritual body: So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body. (1 Corinthians 15:42–44; NIV) ...


4

I think most commentators have understood "terror to good conduct" a little differently than you are understanding it. The phrase is φόβος τῷ ἀγαθῷ ἔργῳ (phobos tō agathō ergō) — literally, "fear [to] the good work". This is nonsensical English, so the ESV has used "terror", which works. I think the idea they intend convey, though, is made more ...



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