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24

Faulty Premise #1: John the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah When Jesus asked Peter who people said he was, he answered that some people thought that Jesus was Elijah come back. Peter knew better and said Jesus was the Christ. In any event, John the Baptist himself directly denied the claim (see John 1:19-21). What Jesus more likely was saying in ...


23

From this discussion, if "three days and three nights" is taken idiomatically, it means 3 days as the Jewish people of the day would have understood it. Now lets take a look at Jesus time in the sepulchre: Part of Friday = one dayspan. All of Saturday = one dayspan. Part of Sunday = one dayspan. Literally three days and three ...


19

In addition to Affable Geek's answer, I would like to add this verse clearly showing that reincarnation is incompatible with Christianity, Hebrews 9:27: ... man is destined to die once, and after that to face judgment...


14

Safe answer: John 20 is the only passage of scripture that discusses this event, so the short answer is - we can't say for sure. In general, we need to be cautious about "reasoning from an absence of scripture." My guess: Thomas made a statement to the effect of "I refuse to believe that Jesus rose from the dead, and the only thing that could change my ...


14

I have heard this explained most often in context of the Jewish culture of the day. For Jews any part of the day is considered as representative of an entire day and night. Thus if Jesus was in the tomb any part of Fri, Sat and Sun it was considered to be three days and three nights. We do something similar, when we say things like "I was at the park all ...


14

Probably the most definitive verse on this is in Luke: 36 While they were telling these things, He Himself stood in their midst and said to them, “Peace be to you.” 37 But they were startled and frightened and thought that they were seeing a spirit. 38 And He said to them, “Why are you troubled, and why do doubts arise in your hearts? 39 See My ...


12

It has been well said that mankind's greatest enemy is death. Whoever would be the Savior of all mankind must then, of necessity, conquer mankind's greatest enemy. Had Jesus merely died and returned to Heaven without overcoming death, then man's greatest enemy would remain unconquered. As it is, we can ask along with the apostle Paul, "Where, O Death, is ...


12

The reason Jesus said this has been the subject of debate. One common belief is that He didn't want her to tarry there, that it was more of a "now is not the time" statemen. Example: Clarke's Commentary on the Bible Touch me not - Μη μου ἁπτου, Cling not to me. Ἁπτομαι has this sense in Job 31:7, where the Septuagint use it for the Hebrew דבק ...


11

Jesus died for our sins What we (and the Bible) mean by the phrase "Jesus died for our sins" is that all sins have a penalty. We see the same thing in the justice systems of nations--for every crime, there is a penalty. When the penalty is paid, we say that justice has been served, and that's a good thing. Our sins are really rebellion against God, and ...


10

St. Augustine said in City of God that we'd all be about 33 (same age as Christ) at that time it was thought that unbaptized babies might go to limbo. Then, again, these words, “Predestinate to be conformed to the image of the Son of God,” may be understood of the inner man. So in another place He says to us, “Be not conformed to this world, but be ye ...


10

St. Thomas Aquinas addressed this pretty deeply, and as I suspected, his answer was yes, Our Lord's risen body was a glorified one. Although it differed in glory in some way from His body in Heaven. I answer that, Christ's was a glorified body in His Resurrection, and this is evident from three reasons. First of all, because His Resurrection was the ...


10

The body of Christ ascended with him into heaven, as was witnessed by his disciples and many others. Luke 24 (ESV): 50 Then he led them out as far as Bethany, and lifting up his hands he blessed them. 51 While he blessed them, he parted from them and was carried up into heaven. 52 And they worshiped him and returned to Jerusalem with great joy, 53 and ...


9

Looking at the passage you quoted, it seems pretty clear that there are two resurrections. The first resurrection is the resurrection of the righteous, while "the rest of the dead (the wicked) did not come to life until the thousand years were ended." It doesn't look to me like it's saying anything about the Rapture; merely that those who were righteous in ...


9

According to The New Evidence That Demands a Verdict by Josh McDowell, p125, Josephus, who died after 100AD, wrote of Jesus in his Jewish Antiquities, "...for he appeared to them alive again the third day; as the divine prophets had foretold these and then thousand other wonderful things concerning him." (Antiquities, XVIII, 33). However, those words are ...


8

Three Days and Three Nights says being in the heart of the earth doesn't mean being dead in the grave, but rather being controlled by the world, so the three days and three nights began when the Son of Man was betrayed into the hands of sinners. The Heart of the Earth So the phrase “in the heart of the earth” can easily be translated as “in the midst of ...


8

Old Testament prophecies are sometimes 'thematic', by 'type' or 'metaphor' as in the case of these three days. There are various places in the Old Testament that give special meaning to three days. The gospels however only refer to the prophecy of Jonah. Christ said that Jonah would be the 'sign' that God would give the Jews, as a rebuke for their ...


8

The phrasing of Matthew 12:40 is an anomaly. The bulk of the New Testament testimony is that Jesus was resurrected, not after three days but on the third day: Matthew 16:21 ...and on the third day be raised. Matthew 17:32 ...and on the third day he will be raised. Luke 9:22 ...and on the third day be raised. Luke 18:33 ...and on the third ...


8

The rule is "no", but like every rule there are exceptions. So "yes". It should be stressed that such views are not mainstream, majority or orthodox in any way. However there are groups that claim to be Christian and hold to a metaphorical view of Christ's resurrection. Likewise, there are groups who claim to be Christian but don't even believe that Christ ...


8

The atonement theology is a complicated one to explain. To the believers, it is a simple acceptance of one's imperfection and the sacrifice of Jesus Christ the perfect one to render us perfect in the eyes of God. To the unbelievers, it is foolishness that God would become human to die for their sins. For the message of the cross is foolishness to those ...


7

1. Is there a name for this period in the various traditions? I am not aware of any for protestant Christianity, but Catholicism refers to this period as Eastertide or the Season of Easter. 2. When he wasn't appearing to people, where and on what was Jesus spending his time? Jesus told the thief on the cross that "today, you will be with me in paradise", ...


7

If one chooses to explain away 1 Corinthians 15:4-7 that he was buried, that he was raised on the third day in accordance with the Scriptures, 5 and that he appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. 6 Then he appeared to more than five hundred brothers at one time, most of whom are still alive, though some have fallen asleep. 7 Then he appeared to James, ...


7

Jesus is called "Israel" (Isa. 49:3) and "David" (Ezek.37:24), both notable patriarchs. Would you also think that Jesus is a reincarnation of both Israel and David? John was prophetically referred to as "Elijah." It has nothing to do with reincarnation. John 1:21 And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith , I am not. Art thou that ...


6

To understand this perspective, it is better to think of "death" as "a separation", rather than "a ceasing to exist". So, when you "die", your spirit is separated from your flesh, and from this world. 1) The second death is the ultimate separation of (the spirits of) sinners from the presence of God. 2) Indeed, (the spirits of) those who are "resurrected" ...


6

I think that Biblically the Good Friday tradition doesn't stand up to scrutiny. The traditional view tends to forget that since it was Passover there would be an additional Sabbath in the chronology. We can see a hint of this in the difference between Mark 16:1 and Luke 23:55 regarding the purchasing of spices by the women. See this website for a detailed ...


6

Jesus was resurrected to a physical body, and as Paul says, was the first-born with that new eternal and physical body. That is our hope now too, because of his resurrection. Colossions 1:15-20: The Son is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For in him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible ...


6

I think the misunderstanding here is that the wicked are resurrected and then killed. I'm not sure there's a Biblical backing for the idea that those who rejected Christ will again be separated from their bodies. Their souls will be in bodies when they are cast into the lake of fire. Therefore, the punishment is eternal, physical, punishment in the ...


6

Elijah resurrected the son of a widow in Zarephath (1 Kings 17:7-24) Elisha resurrected the son of the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-35) A dead man came back to life when he touches Elisha's bones (2 Kings 13:21) Jesus resurrected the widow's son at Nain (Luke 7:11-15) Jesus raised the daughter of Jairus, a Synagogue leader from the dead (Matthew 9:18-25, ...


6

Hands down, Eusebius is your best bet for an "historical" (by which I assume you mean non-biblical) account of the early church. Eusebius is often called the 'Father of Church History'. Although he was not active until the 200s, his work is usually considered by historians of all types - from Dan Wallace to Bart Ehrmann to be the pre-eminent collector of ...



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