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25

Faulty Premise #1: John the Baptist was a reincarnation of Elijah When Jesus asked Peter who people said he was, he answered that some people thought that Jesus was Elijah come back. Peter knew better and said Jesus was the Christ. In any event, John the Baptist himself directly denied the claim (see John 1:19-21). What Jesus more likely was saying in ...


19

In addition to Affable Geek's answer, I would like to add this verse clearly showing that reincarnation is incompatible with Christianity, Hebrews 9:27: ... man is destined to die once, and after that to face judgment...


11

St. Augustine said in City of God that we'd all be about 33 (same age as Christ) at that time it was thought that unbaptized babies might go to limbo. Then, again, these words, “Predestinate to be conformed to the image of the Son of God,” may be understood of the inner man. So in another place He says to us, “Be not conformed to this world, but be ye ...


10

Looking at the passage you quoted, it seems pretty clear that there are two resurrections. The first resurrection is the resurrection of the righteous, while "the rest of the dead (the wicked) did not come to life until the thousand years were ended." It doesn't look to me like it's saying anything about the Rapture; merely that those who were righteous in ...


10

That death and "sleeping," are often conflated in Scripture is perhaps a useful metaphor here. Notice how, in 1 Corinthians 15, Paul likens those who have died to those who have "fallen asleep in Christ." And if Christ has not been raised, your faith is futile; you are still in your sins. 18 Then those also who have fallen asleep in Christ are lost. 19 ...


9

I think the misunderstanding here is that the wicked are resurrected and then killed. I'm not sure there's a Biblical backing for the idea that those who rejected Christ will again be separated from their bodies. Their souls will be in bodies when they are cast into the lake of fire. Therefore, the punishment is eternal, physical, punishment in the ...


7

Jesus is called "Israel" (Isa. 49:3) and "David" (Ezek.37:24), both notable patriarchs. Would you also think that Jesus is a reincarnation of both Israel and David? John was prophetically referred to as "Elijah." It has nothing to do with reincarnation. John 1:21 And they asked him, What then? Art thou Elias? And he saith , I am not. Art thou that ...


7

To understand this perspective, it is better to think of "death" as "a separation", rather than "a ceasing to exist". So, when you "die", your spirit is separated from your flesh, and from this world. 1) The second death is the ultimate separation of (the spirits of) sinners from the presence of God. 2) Indeed, (the spirits of) those who are "resurrected" ...


7

Elijah resurrected the son of a widow in Zarephath (1 Kings 17:7-24) Elisha resurrected the son of the Shunammite woman (2 Kings 4:8-35) A dead man came back to life when he touches Elisha's bones (2 Kings 13:21) Jesus resurrected the widow's son at Nain (Luke 7:11-15) Jesus raised the daughter of Jairus, a Synagogue leader from the dead (Matthew 9:18-25, ...


7

Introduction I intend to show that the concept of a universal realm for all, outside Heaven, where all await the resurrection (Waiting in the Grave, WitG hereafter) is united against other beliefs such as the belief we go Straight to Heaven (StH), that we cease to exist entirely with no afterlife or others such as purgatory/limbo. While there are ...


6

The Bible often uses the word sleep to refer to those who are dead, especially those who are going to be resurrected to life. So I think Jesus meant that the girl was not dead forever, without hope. Yet you sweep people away in the sleep of death— they are like the new grass of the morning (Psalm 90:5) Multitudes who sleep in the dust of the earth ...


5

Abstract The idea that the saved go to heaven when they die is somewhat anachronistic. Equally anachronistic is the idea that people will be "raptured" into heaven when Jesus returns. Paul had another meaning in mind when he wrote this verse. N. T. Wright explains in Surprised By Hope: The word parousia occurs in two of the key passages [concerning ...


5

Reincarnation involves living again, but having another life in a new body, as a new person/being. On this one, Wikipedia is as good a source as any. Reincarnation is the religious or philosophical concept that the soul or spirit, after biological death, begins a new life in a new body that may be human, animal or spiritual depending on the moral ...


5

In addition to David Stratton's great answer, reincarnation has a very different idea of the nature of the soul and spirit. As you can see in the word's form, it is based on incarnation, when a spirit takes on flesh. The Eastern religions which believe in reincarnation believe that the soul or spirit is eternal and just temporarily takes on a body. This is ...


5

While the parallels aren't exact, there are some points that are rather interesting. The Saducees believed in a strict interpretation of the Law as originally written, and rejected religious innovation. It wasn't so much that they didn't believe that there were prophets after Moses as that they didn't hold them to be prophets in quite the same, ...


5

No one knows for sure. The Bible doesn't speak directly to this issue, no Pope has spoken ex cathedra about it, and no ecumenical council has addressed it. The "angelic doctor" Thomas Aquinas wrote in his catechism: All will rise in the condition of perfect age, which is of thirty-two or thirty-three years. This is because all who were not yet arrived ...


4

The Athanasian Creed, which is accepted by most christian, (esp. catholic, orthodox, anglican, Lutheran, etc.) reads thus: ...He ascended into heaven, he sitteth on the right hand of the God the Father Almighty, from whence he will come to judge the quick and the dead. At whose coming all men will rise again with their bodies; And shall give account for ...


4

There are two types of Resurrections in the Bible. 1. Temporary Resurrection Those who are brought back from the dead without a new body given to them. They will still die again when their time comes. This resurrection is mostly for the purpose of God's glory or to simply extend the life of the dead person on Earth as a result of prayer. This, even now is ...


4

The answer is because Jesus was without sin. When Adam and Eve first sinned, not only were they thrown out of the Garden of Eden, but they were also rendered mortal; they were now capable of dying. Everyone who sins dies, and everyone sins. Even those before Jesus who died and were returned to life (like Lazarus) still had to die again later. Jesus however ...


4

No. In 1 Kings 17, Elijah the Tishbite, the Prophet, raised the son of the widow of Zaraphath Some time later the son of the woman who owned the house became ill. He grew worse and worse, and finally stopped breathing. She said to Elijah, “What do you have against me, man of God? Did you come to remind me of my sin and kill my son?” “Give me your son,” ...


3

The "dead in Christ" (οἱ νεκροὶ ἐν Χριστῷ) refers to "those who are asleep" (τοὺς κοιμηθέντας; cp. 1 Thes. 4:14). The Greek phrase ἐν Χριστῷ means one who is incorporated into the body of Christ, i.e. a Christian. Thus, οἱ νεκροὶ ἐν Χριστῷ means "dead Christians." Specifically, it is referring to the bodies of Christians lying in the grave, for the soul does ...


3

In short, Jesus' resurrection had to be first, because his resurrection is the cause of our resurrection. Keep in mind that the resurrection of Jesus is unique. Jesus is fully man, certainly, but he is also fully God, hypostatically united to the Word. (See John 1:1 and 1:14: "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God;" ...


3

The disparity between those labeling them one way or the other is not due to there being disagreement over what the Sadducees and the Pharisees believed, who they were, or what they were like. Rather, the disparity is caused by a wishy-washy definition of the terms liberal and conservative. The terms liberal and conservative have many different meanings ...


3

The two events only differ on two points: Who is raised. When they are raised. Both parties are actually judged equally, and we assume the method of the raising is the same. The First Resurrection takes place at Christ's coming and consists of the Righteous Christians only. For the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice ...


3

In Alma 40, it also states: 21 But whether it be at his [Christ's] resurrection or after, I do not say; but this much I say, that there is a space between death and the resurrection of the body, and a state of the soul in happiness or in misery until the time which is appointed of God that the dead shall come forth, and be reunited, both soul and ...


3

What an excellent question, as it forced me to really think it through. I think the disconnect is in the very first lines. You make two assumptions that Mormons would not agree with. The first is that without a physical body a spirit is able to be in more than one place at a time. Doctrine and Covenants 131:7-8 7 There is no such thing as ...


3

So if the dead are already with Jesus where are the dead in Christ rising from? Those who died in faith in the Old Testament are to be raised at the second coming of Christ. Daniel 12:2 And many of them that sleep in the dust of the earth shall awake, some to everlasting life, and some to shame and everlasting contempt. Hebrews 11:40 God ...


3

Like God, we humans are spiritual beings. Unlike God, we are not just spirit; we are physical, corporeal bodies which are animated by spirit. Imagine, if you will, a living body. Picture this body standing upright, but perfectly still. Every system in the body is functioning as it should: the heart is beating at 72 times a minute; the oxygen-carbon-dioxide ...


3

Ecclesiastes 3 eloquently frames the problem: I said to myself, “God will bring into judgment both the righteous and the wicked, for there will be a time for every activity, a time to judge every deed.” 18 I also said to myself, “As for humans, God tests them so that they may see that they are like the animals. 19 Surely the fate of ...



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