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11

This answer relates to the Church of Scotland. Dancing has often been regarded with deep suspicion in the Presbyterian tradition. Originally, it was strongly associated with all kinds of bad behaviour, and would certainly not be permitted in church. Even after dancing became more socially acceptable, church was still meant to be a solemn and sober place. ...


7

It's cultural. This is a Catholic answer, but not based on Catholic Dogma or even the Bible. It's just common sense. In the Western Hemisphere, and western Europe (commonly and ruefully [here at least] referred to as the West) we don't need dance to communicate. Furthermore, we can't even interpret dance as language. In African (and other) cultures ...


4

I think many Christians view dancing with suspicion because it inherently focuses attention on the body, and we need to be careful in how we think about the bodies of people other than our spouses. Many dances involve close physical contact between two people. To what extent is this appropriate? Or if we are observing someone dance, especially men observing ...


2

There are a number of times that the Psalms have a call and response to them (there is one which has "for his love endures forever" as the second half of every verse). The liturgy which is shown in the book of Revelation has a clear chorus which is separate from the congregation (elders who bow down are separate from the great multitude). If it is possible ...


1

It comes from vows and religious oaths. See this post on the Puritan Board for a discussion of the inclusion of creeds. In particular, this portion is of interest: WCF 21:5 "...are all parts of the ordinary religious worship of God (Mat_28:19; Act_2:42; 1Co_11:23-29): besides religious oaths (Deu_6:13 with Neh_10:29), vows Isa_19:21 with Eccl 5;4, ...



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