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What is the Biblical argument against Limited Atonement? Proponents claim that because not everyone is saved, God could not have intended that Christ die for everyone. There is an assumption in this logic regarding God's intentions. We get an insight into God's intentions from the these verses; 1 John 2:2 And he is the propitiation for our sins: and ...


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First, let's have some slightly more in-depth definitions. Charles Hodge describes what traducianists believe as follows: Traducianists on the one hand deny that the soul is created; and on the other hand, they affirm that it is produced by the law of generation, being as truly derived from the parents as the body. The whole man, soul and body, is ...


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Reformed theologians regularly use the name "Jehovah" (or its equivalent, "Yahweh"), but they do not limit the name to God the Father: they believe it refers to the Godhead, that is, it is also the name of Jesus and the Holy Spirit. Regarding Jesus being Jehovah, see John Calvin's Institutes: Isaiah prophesies, that “the Lord of Hosts” shall be “for a ...


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Calvinists interpret these passages as both pronouncements against the sinful actions of the Pharisees as well as warnings to those who might follow them. But ultimately these actions cannot circumvent God's will: they will be judged for their attempts and sinful motivations, but God's irresistible grace, when offered, always overcomes resistance. Verse 13 ...


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This perhaps isn't a typical answer to the question, but it does provide the opinion of one well-known Calvinist, George Whitefield. Whitefield was once asked if he expected to see his Arminian friend John Wesley in heaven. He replied: I fear not, for he will be so near the eternal throne and we at such a distance, we shall hardly get sight of him. ...


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Calvinists from Calvin to the present day have interpreted this verse as relating to man's assurance, not God's will. John Calvin specifically responds to those who say this verse implies that the "stability of our calling and election depends on good works," saying: [P]urity of life is not improperly called the evidence and proof of election, by ...


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Summary: Calvinists interpret these passages as referring to God's righteousness and justice — that he is a fair judge, consistently judging sin as wrong, whether committed by rich or poor, strong or weak, native or foreigner. They do not indicate that God's gracious gifts — wealth, strength, and even salvation — are distributed equally to all. Calvinists ...


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Why is it rare to combine Reformed/Calvinist doctrine and Dispensationalism? Adam Smith (who was no fan of religion) thought different denominations were great. He saw that in order to coexist in the marketplace of ideas, they would eventually have to drop those things that were distinctive so that they would not produce discord and thus become impotent. ...


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As an ex-Calvinist turned mid-Acts dispensationalist, I find there are two primary points of contention that lead to all the rest: Covenant/Reformed theology's tendency to allegorize or spiritualize various parts of Scripture vs dispensationalism's tendency to take it literally where it seems literally intended. Covenant/Reformed folk (and others, to ...



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