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Your hunch is correct; Reformed thinkers tend to reject the idea that there was some special authority inherent in this group. Instead, the authority comes from God, and the group is a faithful witness to it. Regarding this particular phrase, the 16th century Protestant/Reformed Geneva Study Bible says: Not that men have any authority of themselves, ...


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Nathaniel's answer above is the correct one, but I would like to give another perspective. I think it is worthwhile to contrast writings of Presbyterianism's biggest hero (John Calvin) with modern teachings from Evangelicalsism's biggest hero (Billy Graham, or at least his website) to draw some distinctions. To get a good summary of the soteriology of the ...


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As you mention, evangelicalism refers to a movement that typically emphasizes salvation through faith in Christ, the authority of the Bible, evangelism, and a conversion experience. On the other hand, presbyterianism refers primarily to a form of church government. In this system, elders rule the church – a session of elders is responsible for leading ...


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The themes are actually handled no different by Edwards or Reformed Theologians then they are by other Christian denominantions. Theologians generally do not mean that God has no feelings when saying that he is 'unchanging in his perfect boundless joy'. From the standpoint of impassibility, Edwards is not opposing the same concept detailed by Thomas Aquinas (...



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