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Sorry Nathaniel, I'm not able to comment yet, I'm new to this site :). It's basically a model of Jesus's ministry and the actions of the early church. He chose several disciples/apostles, trained them in helping the poor, healing the sick, and leading the Church, and eventually set them out on their own. See Acts 6: Brothers and sisters, choose seven ...


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How do “once saved, always saved” advocates explain the Parable of the Sower? There is a frame of reference issue here that needs to be clarified first. Everything that Jesus said, taught, and did was consistent with a legitimate offer of the Kingdom to the nation of Israel. He never winked and said, “I know you guys are going to blow it so here is the real ...


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I don't have time to write out a fully supported answer right now, but I saw this thread as interesting and wanted to comment. I can write more later if you want; I work at a Presbyterian church. Firstly, I would say, why not? It's been a successful model for many churches to have a democratic-ruling session; other models that rely too heavily upon a ...


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The Christian Research Institute (CRI) conducted an investigation. Their initial findings were not flattering on the question of whether this group is a church or a cult. They later retracted their conclusion after further research. Here is their retraction: http://www.equip.org/article/we-were-wrong/ Main article about the Local Church and their beliefs: ...


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Theory suggests that Calvin's strong support for and writings about penal substitution was tied to his work in the legal system (as a lawyer). The concept is definitely a parallel. [Christ] made a substitute and a surety in the place of transgressors and even submitted as a criminal, to sustain and suffer all the punishment which would have been ...


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The strongest defenders of penal substitution are going to be conservative Calvinists: that is, those who hold to the "five points" of Calvinism and reject modernist approaches to Scripture. Outside this group, many nonetheless hold to penal substitution, but there is more diversity of opinion. A few examples of conservative Calvinists who hold to penal ...


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This statement, by itself, is in line with the main strands of Reformed theology,1 when the word "call" is understood to mean external call. The Scriptures, therefore, in the most explicit terms teach that the external call of the gospel is addressed to all men. (Charles Hodge, ST, 3.4.1) [External calling] comes to both the just and the unjust, the ...


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Yes, the God the Calvinists believe in is unjust. Paul makes it pretty clear in the beginning of Romans: "[God] will render to every man according to his deeds: To them who by patient continuance in well doing seek for glory and honour and immortality, eternal life: But unto them that are contentious, and do not obey the truth, but obey unrighteousness, ...


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This stream seems to be from a few years ago, but I thought I would add a couple of notes here. I've read two key questions here: 1) Is God just if he condemns sinners who are born evil? and 2) Can Man really judge God's standard of justice by man's standard of justice? If a child is born blind in a country where it's illegal to be illiterate, I think we ...


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I would expect that every Christian denomination would see Jesus's death as the fulfilment of both the Passover sacrifice and the Day of Atonement sacrifices and rituals, because the identification is made in the scriptures themselves. 1 Corinthians 5:7 says directly that Christ is our Passover lamb: Cleanse out the old leaven that you may be a new ...



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