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16

John Piper recently addressed a portion of this question in the context of Minnesota's "Same-Sex Marriage Amendment". Having listened to his sermons on Romans 1 and other statements by him, the following principles are his consistent teaching on the question: Marriage is created and defined by God in the Scriptures as the sexual and covenantal union ...


15

While this is easy enough to answer from a Reformed point of view, I'd like to start by pointing out that the felt need for extra-Biblical statements on matters of faith is not limited to Reformed circles or even Protestantism. In fact they are common to all traditions and sects in Christendom.1 Even your most run-of-the-mill non-denominational ...


11

No. The Left Behind series is A) entirely fictional and B) based on Dispensationalism.* Dispensationalism is almost universally at odds with Reformed theology. The basic problem lies in the understanding of the way God relates to his people. Understanding this relationship in the context of covenants that get renewed with unfolding detail but don't ...


8

It largely depends on which Calvinist you ask :) The author of one of the more famous Systematic Theology works (can't remember if it was Shedd, Berkhof, or Hodge... I remember reading it in a defense of Classical Arminianism by Picirilli) said that predestination is not unto faith. This indicates that predestination is unto regeneration. So what is ...


8

There are Reformed Christians who are not Presbyterian (or at least wouldn't call themselves that), especially in the Dutch or Continental tradition such as the RCUS and URCNA. There are also Presbyterians that are not Reformed, such as many in the PCUSA, who would be better called "liberal". Further complicating the matter is that, as Brian Johnson pointed ...


7

Perhaps the two "common" responses are not "intellectually satisfying", but at the very least, they are both highly biblical: And He said to them, "Go into all the world and preach the gospel to all creation." {Mark 16:15} and for "Whoever will call on the name of the Lord will be saved." How then will they call on Him in whom they have not ...


6

You're not going to like this answer, but that's because I think the premise is flawed. Why is homosexuality given a standing all its own? What's wrong with the other hundreds of works and confessions by Reformed thinkers regarding sin? The question is not one of legality, but one of morality. Speaking from a Reformed Baptist perspective (I know, not truly ...


6

I found this summary of reformed theology very helpful: http://www.reformedreader.org/t.u.l.i.p.htm Reformed theology emphasizes the doctrines of grace, best known by the acronym TULIP, though this does not correspond to the best possible names for the five doctrines. ... U stands for unconditional election. An emphasis on election bothers ...


6

The problem you raise is only a problem because a doctrine has been cherry-picked and used out of context. Taken in step with and understanding of God's Covenant relationship with men and the whole counsel of Scripture, this becomes a non issue. And no, your suggestions are not particularly in line with Reformed theology, at least not as a motivation for ...


6

Yes, if you read "because" as indicating a causal relationship, no if it's just giving the reason or purpose. "Because of our justification" might suggest that some action done by us is the cause of the resurrection. That's a problem for Reformed theology, and probably not just for us either, as it's a bit logically and temporally difficult. If we read ...


6

James is writing his epistle to "my brethren" (1:2), who are already of the church, so he is not writing to unbelievers to tell them how to be saved from their sins an get right with God. His readers have already come to Jesus and had their sins washed away in the blood of the Lamb, been justified by faith, and entered into a saving relationship with God. ...


5

I'm not sure if this is precisely what you are looking for, but your question immediately reminded me of Augustine's City of God: Chapter 35.—Of the Sons of the Church Who are Hidden Among the Wicked, and of False Christians Within the Church. Let these and similar answers (if any fuller and fitter answers can be found) be given to their enemies by ...


5

Approaching the throne of grace is an inward action and would actually be a natural part of going to one's brother to be reconciled (perhaps along the lines of "Thank you God for bringing this issue to mind and please give me the proper words when I go before my brother."). If one was coming before one's king, who is renown for his love of justice, to ...


5

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7GrwL5pXHbc This video is very helpful at seeing the overlap and distinctions between Reformed Baptist theology and Dispensationalism. First of all, you'd have to define Reformed Baptist. I prefer to define it as someone who holds to the 1689 London Baptist Confession. The LBCF1689 is a covenantal confession which by ...


5

If you (say you) have faith but don't have works, do you really have faith? Works are the result of faith. They don't save you. If you have faith, it is only natural that you will have works. James's question is to people who have no works. Why don't you have any works? Where is your faith? Matthew 12:33 (NASB) "Make a tree good and its fruit will be ...


4

You're asking about two different elements of the traditional reformed acronym TULIP: Unconditional Election - That Christ's elect are called without regard to their own merits. Irresistible Grace - That the elect are drawn to Christ despite the fact that their sin nature keeps them away and this drawing is actually irresistible. The crux of your ...


4

Although Caleb's answer is far better than this, I think you are asking something more philosophical that is hard to express.   First, I think the simple answer is that the Bible is not written as a system of theology, which a statemt of faith summarizes. It does not make precise general assertions with clearly defined logical deductions into a system of ...


4

this is actually exploring the entire theological framework of reformed theology using this particular verse only That's a bad idea from a Reformed or any other perspective. To take one verse and attempt to understand a full theology based on it is simply not possible. The surest way to misinterpret Scripture is to take verses out of context. Taken ...


4

Jehovah is an English rendition of the proper name of God from the Hebrew Bible, also rendered "Yahweh" or YHWH, which means I AM and is referred to as "The Tetragrammaton". It isn't specific to Jehovah's Witnesses, and can be found in many older English translations of the Bible.\ In the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) the doctrine of the Trinity isn't really ...


4

This is an interesting question. Bear with me as I attempt to build a bit of Confessional background to my answer. It's clear from Article 5 of the Augsburg Confession that the office of the ministry was instituted by God to preach the Gospel and administer the Sacraments (http://bookofconcord.org/augsburgconfession.php#article5). This is God's "Right ...


4

I'm going to take a stab at this: Essentially, reformed theology suggests that man is completely sinful. That's the T in TULIP for Total Depravity. We're so sinful that we're beyond saving on our power. The thing that might get lost in this is that even a single sin. No matter how small is enough to keep us completely separated from God. Hypocrisy is ...


4

Let's compare what Paul said in the Greek with a consideration of the doctrine of perseverance, in light of what several commentators taught on 1 Corinthians 9:27. "Adokimos" The word in 1Co 9:27 that is commonly translated as "disqualified" is "adokimos" (ἀδόκιμος) in the Greek (Strongs G96), and was normally used to refer to adulterated currencies, ...


4

Baptists and many evangelicals reject the notion of a sacremental "priest" that is somehow in essence different than mere laity, but still ordain their ministers. A "priest" confers the idea that the person is specially endowed with the ability to stand between man and God. Those who subscribe to the idea of the "priesthood of all believers" do not believe ...


3

It's important to note that the Mark passage records Jesus telling one specific person to sell all his possessions and give to the poor. Jesus did not give this command to all people in all times. It is inappropriate to take everything Jesus ever said to any person and attempt to apply it to all people for all times. If we did that, then all of us would ...


3

I'm going to attempt to answer this in a way that is truthful, and accurate, but maybe not exactly what you're looking for. Please be very mindful of where I say "assuming this definition, then..." On those statements, I am intentionally using that assumption as a logical starting point for assumptions. I am not saying I hold those views, or that I ...


3

To try and give a simple answer... Covenant theology and Biblical theology is(are?) apples and oranges. Biblical theology is more in the category with Systematic Theology so to speak. Where Systematic Theology sets out categories and asks what does the Bible as a whole say about each category. Biblical theology asks what are the theological themes in the ...


3

Generally speaking you are correct but I would not say people left their own denominations to join the Pentecostal church, rather like all new denominations just some of the initial founders did, but as it grew it became its own proper denomination with its majority being its own converts.  It is interesting to look at the Holy Spirit under the heads that ...


3

This passage, I think gives a good quick perspective on the Calvinist understanding of regeneration [especially when read in light of the Calvinist reading of ideas like "dead in transgressions and sin" (Ephesians 2:1) and God's act of replacing a man's hard heart with a new one (Ezekiel 36:26)]: Titus 3:3-7 (ESV) 3  For we ourselves were once ...


3

So far I have found the following works, but have not had time to study them: The address on self-examination in Discourses Suited to the Administration of the Lord's Supper by John Brown The Necessity of Self-Examination by Jonathan Edwards (apparently in audio form here) Practical Religion by J. C. Ryle I also found these sermons, but have not studied ...


3

But the way [Acts 15:28 is] phrased, and the context of the meeting, seem to point to the church having authority in this moment; that there's something special about these people being gathered together, under the guidance of the Holy Spirit, which gives them the right to make the decision and send the letter. Yes. The early church leaders had the ...



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