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29

This is a major point of Romans 6. After arguing that the coming of the law increased the number of trespasses, and that subsequently "grace abounded all the more," Paul warns those who might twist his words: 6:1 What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? 2 By no means! How can we who died to sin still live in it? 6:15 ...


16

This question is complicated, of course, by the fact that we must work with translations of the original texts in order to find this wording. However, at least three second-century authors use this phrasing when translated into English: Justin Martyr, Athenagoras of Athens, and Clement of Alexandria. Justin Martyr (100–165) writes, in Dialogue with ...


8

There are a few verses in Romans that might be what you're thinking of: Romans 3:8 ESV And why not do evil that good may come?—as some people slanderously charge us with saying. Their condemnation is just. Romans 6:1 ESV What shall we say then? Are we to continue in sin that grace may abound? Romans 6:15 ESV What then? Are we to sin because ...


8

Jude 4 says: "I say this because some ungodly people have wormed their way into your churches saying that God's marvelous grace allows us to live immoral lives. The condemnation of such people was recorded long ago, for they have denied our only Master and Lord Jesus Christ." New Living translation


8

Roger Nicole was certainly not the first to say this. The quote can be traced to two 17th-century English authors, Thomas Manton and Nathaniel Culverwell. Culverwell's version of the quote appears in his 1652 work, published one year after his death, An Elegant and Learned Discourse of the Light of Nature. He writes that Augustine's attack on Pelagianism ...


6

Short answer There is not a single passage in the New Testment that even encourages phisical violence against others. Long answer Yes, at the Old Testment you have some instructions that involves death penalty, for example, for murder (Exodus 21:12), kidnapping (Exodus 21:16), bestiality (Exodus 22:19), adultery (Leviticus 20:10), homosexuality ...


5

The idea that Epiphanius claimed the people of India were descendant from Abraham and Keturah appears to be derived from a conflation of two passages. In De Fide, 12.5 he writes: But again, I omit the names of many other mysteries, heresiarches and fomenters of schism whose leaders are called Magusaeans by the Persias but prophets by the Egyptians, and ...


5

Dictionnaire historique ... de la Bible Usually when someone cites Calmet, it is a reference to his 1722 Dictionnaire historique, critique, chronologique, géographique et littéral de la Bible, published under the English title Dictionary of the Holy Bible. I will use this English translation for my answer. It has some additions by an American author, but ...


5

You are probably thinking of Elijah, as recounted in 1 Kings 19. It occurs right after Elijah's 'competition' with the prophets of Baal, and also includes the "still small voice" of God. The Catholic Church prescribes this passage, 1 Kings 19:4–8, as the first reading for the 19th Sunday in Ordinary Time, Cycle B, which in 2015 fell on August ...


4

As correctly explained in Jon's answer, non-belief in the Bible is normally in terms of practical atheism ("there is no god that impacts my life") rather than absolute atheism ("there is no higher power of any kind"). With that is mind, there are a large number of Bible verse that talk about atheism. As the OP notes, Psalms 14:1 and the parallel in 53:1 ...


4

The Complete Jewish Bible you are looking at (notably, not a Jewish translation at all) is following the numbering scheme of the Masoretic Text where that text corresponds with 2:16-17. In most Christian English translations, this is labeled 2:14-15. (JPS Tanakh and Judaica Press Tanach also use the Masoretic numbering.) The difference arises because the ...


4

From the table of contents of the book you linked to*, the 19 are: The Apostolic Gift Prophecy Evangelism Shepherding Teaching Exhortation Knowledge Wisdom Helps Hospitality Giving Government Showing Mercy Faith Discernment Miracles Healing Tongues Interpretation *To see the list yourself, click on the link to the amazon product listing, click the book ...


4

He discusses the tetragrammaton at several places in the grammar.1 In §102m he includes the vowel pointing patach-šĕwă-sĕgōl that leads to our English “Yahweh”. That is: יַהְוֶה‎. Elsewhere throughout the grammar he either uses the unpointed יהוה or the Masoretic יְהוָֹה (šĕwă'-ḥōlem-qāmeṣ; that is, the vowels of אֲדֹנָי ʾădōnāy 2). The relationship between ...


4

When I search Google for your exact wording "sinning and knowing it's wrong, but sinning anyway because you know God will forgive you" the top result identifies Hebrews 10:26-31: For if we go on sinning deliberately after receiving the knowledge of the truth, there no longer remains a sacrifice for sins, but a fearful expectation of judgment, and a fury ...


4

The study you cite is an early attempt at wordprint analysis of the Book of Mormon. If you are interested in looking at attempts to identify authorship of portions of the Book of Mormon using this technique, you could look through the sources cited in this Wikipedia section. There have been a number of attempts at this type of analysis, and some of the ...


3

Published commentaries, with insights The stories of Jonah and Jesus in boats are quite similar, so the question becomes one of whether the story of Jonah in some way prefigures that of Jesus or whether the story of Jesus calming the storm was substantially based on the story of Jonah. Many commentaries that find prefigurement in the Book of Jonah really ...


3

If you are referring to Christ's second coming: Your story implies that Jesus has come in some sort of secret way. Consider the implications of 1 Thessalonians 4:16: For the Lord himself will come down from heaven, with a loud command, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet call of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. (NIV) When ...


3

A few verses earlier, Esther states the law as such,”…any man or woman who approaches the king in the inner court without being summoned the king has but one law: that they be put to death unless the king extends the gold scepter to them and spares their lives.” Under these circumstances, it is no stretch to say that the king, who had ultimate authority, is ...


3

The first published use of this phrase can be attributed to Cardinal Pole, in a speech given to the English Parliament in 1554, regarding England's return to Roman Catholicism under Queen Mary: This I protest before you, my commission is not of prejudice to any person. I come not to destroy, but to build: I come to reconcile, not to condemn: I am not ...


3

Check out Gianni Vattimo's work. He's a modern Italian philosopher who identifies as both a nihilist and a Catholic. His main interests are Heidegger, Nietzsche and Rene Girard. To him, the death of God represents the end of metaphysics (which he deduced is a form of violence), as revealed by the death of Christ. After Christ's death, we are freed from the ...


3

The Golden Legend, by Archbishop Jacobus de Voraigne of Genoa, published between 1260 and 1275, and printed many times (once printing was invented), was a medieval best seller. It included the lives of many saints and much other information. It states that the Annunciation and the Crucifixion, and several other events, happened on March 25th. The ...


2

A king could also be a priest, just not a member of the Aaronic priesthood. As Mawia has already stated, in pre-monarchic Israel and throughout the Levant, both father (as head of the household) and firstborn sons typically served as priests (e.g., Numbers 3:13). In addition, the king typically served as a priest for the entire nation (as with Melchizedek ...


2

I have searched the writings of Bernard of Clairvaux, and was unable to find that exact quote. It's possible that your quote was a paraphrase of the original. I do know that the closing sentence of "On the Love of God" is "Those who love God are one Spirit with Him." This seems to be close to the meaning, if not the actual words. Often in history we ...


2

tl;dnr The scriptures tell us we do not have free will. We cannot choose Christ unless God supernaturally causes us to desire him and so causes us to choose him. Further, we cannot make even the smallest day to day decisions differently from the way we do make them, right down the to the words I'm typing. "The lot is cast into the lap but its every decision ...


2

There are a number of passages in the Old Testament where God is described as supporting the Israelites in their quest to kill or otherwise drive out the native tribes of their land, including places where God is described as forbidding or punishing mercy. Judges 6:16 would be one typical example. These are generally in what are known as the "historical ...


2

Found it! From: What is Augustine's original of Tolstoy's "Three Hermits" story?


2

Perhaps you are thinking of "The Interior Castle" by St. Teresa of Avila, Doctor of the Catholic Church? On page 77 of the document at this link, the introduction to the 3rd Chapter, she specifically cites 2 Cor. xii. 2-4. This sounds to me close to your question, though this is not the final stage of perfection in that book.


2

Fr. Garrigou-Lagrange, O.P., in his Three Ages of the Interior Life (part III, ch. XIII, B. "The Union of Humility and Christian Dignity"): In his commentary on this chapter of the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, St. Thomas speaks admirably of the union of humility and magnanimity in St. Paul. He writes as follows: “As charity is the root of the ...


2

As far as research on this goes, I couldn't find a single source which ascribes this prayer to any particular church father, and I doubt any church father is the author. I found an interesting article on this prayer and its origins. You can find it here. It says, "Besides the Greek text, ancient versions can be found in Coptic, Syriac, Armenian & ...


1

Does God encourage hurting or killing others in his name in the Bible? The Bible has two parts. The last part (the New Testament) is the culmination of God’s work in man such that believers can have new and eternal life in Jesus. Since Christians have God living in them, they do not need to worry about others. Even though there are those in history who ...



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