Hot answers tagged

13

Protestants would consistently reject certain things connected to the doctrine of Purgatory. Regarding justification by faith alone: the fate of the dead should not be affected by their own suffering (Christ's atonement being sufficient) nor by the prayers and other works of the living. Moreover, Protestants would not believe in a role for the Church here - ...


10

Some background: what Purgatory is, and what it is not Before answering the question, it is necessary to understand exactly what the Church means by “Purgatory.” The Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC) says the following: 1030. All who die in God's grace and friendship, but still imperfectly purified, are indeed assured of their eternal salvation; ...


8

The short answer is that prayer can help shorten the time someone spends in Purgatory, but, as was pointed out, funerals predated Christianity so it would be incorrect to state that funerals will help shorten the time, in part, because funerals are a way for those that survive to reflect on and to have closure over the loss of a loved one. In the Catechism ...


8

From what I understand, the idea behind Purgatory is that it is a place or state where sinful believers go before they are admitted to Heaven. It is believed that it is possible for the living to pray for and atone for the sins of the dead so they may be admitted into Heaven. This belief is mostly based on 2 Maccabees 39-46, which is a part of the Catholic ...


8

It appears that Augustine believed that purgatory was real, but didn't believe the matter was settled. His agnosticism seems clearest in this passage: It is a matter that may be inquired into, and either ascertained or left doubtful, whether some believers shall pass through a kind of purgatorial fire, and in proportion as they have loved with more or ...


8

Luther's beliefs on purgatory evolved over time. A quick search on the Internet will find people claiming he accepted purgatory, offering quotes to prove it, and others saying he rejected it, also offering quotes to prove it. As such, a thorough investigation into his belief during different time periods is warranted. 95 Theses Any investigation into ...


7

To the best of my knowledge, the details of purgatory have never been set out in an official Vatican document (like a papal bull, council decree, etc.). The magisterium of the church is somewhat vague on this point. (For some well-cited reading on various aspects of purgatory, see New Advent's Catholic Encyclopedia.) Somewhat recently, however, Pope ...


6

a_hardin has it pretty well summed up. There's also 1 Peter 3:18-20 (NIV) that supports this notion quite well. 18 For Christ also suffered once for sins, the righteous for the unrighteous, to bring you to God. He was put to death in the body but made alive in the Spirit. 19 After being made alive, he went and made proclamation to the imprisoned ...


6

Anyone who dies in sin, but not Mortal Sin, goes to Purgatory. This would include Priests and Bishops (the Pope is the Bishop of Rome). There are specific cases that the Church says the person will go straight to heaven. We say Mary was assumed into heaven; she did not go to Purgatory. Martyrs are also said to go straight to heaven according to religion ...


6

I would imagine that the Orthodox priest, his interlocutor, or both, misinterpreted what they were seeing. As you know, the Church has a concept of "partial indulgence", historically often associated with a specific amount of time. The intention, as I understand it, is that gaining the indulgence corresponds not to that amount of time off Purgatory, but to ...


5

There is no spreadsheet or calculator used to decide how long one is in purgatory. But there's no official take on the average sentence, time wise. According to the church, only God knows the exact amount of time a person must spend in purgatory before attaining a state of purity. It's assumed, however, that the severity of one's punishment will be directly ...


5

The post Bl. John Paul the Great conception of purgatory was that it is a 'state' and not a place. So whatever, private revelation I allude to in the following sentences are not indiciative of universal Catholic doctrine (if you find any please report it to the dept. of redundancy dept) It would seem that Purgatory is For the soul's purification in the ...


5

Very good question that I would like to see if I can answer to your satisfaction or at least give you some pointers to where to obtain a deeper understanding of the mystery of what happens to our soul after death. You can find biblical passages in my references that support this understanding by the Church and has been expanded and deepened over the ...


5

The only one I've seen Wright specifically identify is Pope Benedict XVI. In Wright's 2004 book For All the Saints?, after briefly discussing Karl Rahner's unusual purgatorial theology, he turns to a discussion of Benedict: Perhaps more remarkable still is the view of Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, who has held high office in the Vatican for many years. ...


4

Note: I originally used this answer to What is the scriptural basis for the idea that salvation can still be obtained after death? but I deleted it because it was answering a different question. This question. There are a lot of scriptures that could reference purgatory, but nothing that outright says "when you die, you will go to a sort of holding place ...


4

Pope Benedict XVI addressed this in a General Audience on 15 February 2012: The second word spoken by Jesus on the Cross recorded by St Luke is a word of hope, it is his answer to the prayer of one of the two men crucified with him. The good thief comes to his senses before Jesus and repents, he realizes he is facing the Son of God who makes the very ...


4

The main books of the Bible that support Purgatory are in, what protestants term, the Apocrypha, which means, to protestants, they are not considered Sacred Scripture, specifically 2 Macc 12:41-46, making atonement for the dead. The fact that there is no direct reference to praying for the dead in the protestant bible, and drawing from what Jesus said, "Let ...


3

In short, No. Purgatory did not exist before Christ rose from the dead. They were in the Limbo of the Fathers (limbus patrum). I know it is long, but here is the Catholic teaching from the Catechism of the Catholic Church: 632 The frequent New Testament affirmations that Jesus was “raised from the dead” presuppose that the crucified one sojourned in ...


3

The geography of the afterlife is not a topic where the church had "doctrine" as such, though there have always been a variety of traditions and stories about this sort of thing. Dante's scheme does reflect an underlying theology, so I'll tackle this from a theological perspective. The layouts of Hell, Purgatory and Heaven are all in some sense "orthodox" in ...


3

I believe there are many points on which Dante had disagreed with the Church teachings of his times. For example Divine Comedy was written around 1308 A.D. to 1321 A.D, in which he has depicted many Popes as suffering eternal damnation in hell namely Pope Anastasius II and Pope Nicholas III. Even though The doctrine of Papal infallibility was defined ...


3

The way the Good Thief entered Heaven is an example of how God is not bound by His sacraments. 1257 The Lord himself affirms that Baptism is necessary for salvation. He also commands his disciples to proclaim the Gospel to all nations and to baptize them. Baptism is necessary for salvation for those to whom the Gospel has been proclaimed and who have ...


3

The means of any forgiveness is penance. The following is taken from the Catechism of the Catholic Church: ARTICLE 4: THE SACRAMENT OF PENANCE AND RECONCILIATION 1422 Those who approach the sacrament of Penance obtain pardon from God's mercy for the offense committed against him, and are, at the same time, reconciled with the Church which they have ...


3

In an appendix to Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica, Jean Nicolai, a 17th-century commentator on Aquinas, states that not much can be said about Purgatory, but he seems to imply that it is a place: Nothing is clearly stated in Scripture about the situation of Purgatory, nor is it possible to offer convincing arguments on this question. It is probable, ...


3

Those on earth do not know with certainty whether one is in hell, purgatory, or heaven—unless the Church has canonized the faithfully departed as a saint, in which case one is certain he or she is in heaven. Thus, Catholics pray for departed souls in the case they might be in purgatory: …the Catholic Church, instructed by the Holy Ghost, has, from the ...


2

The Catechism says: "An indulgence is partial or plenary according as it removes either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin." The faithful can gain indulgences for themselves or apply them to the dead. CCC 1471 and I think that answers it. Every time you bless yourself with holy water, you have a partial indulgence. A plenary ...


2

No, there is no definite symbol for purgatory. There is nothing that when you look at it, you will think "that means purgatory". The "fish" IXOYE is one of the many symbols of Jesus, as is the "Chi Rho" symbol: ☧, ⳩ The cross is a symbol of Christianity: ✝ But there is nothing of the sort for purgatory. But there is also no definite Christian symbol for ...


2

There is still a binary choice, but it's not God who makes the decision. He leaves it to each of us to choose for ourselves one way or the other, and gives us our whole lifetime to make that decision. God could make the decision for us — He has that power — and He knows in advance — if concepts like "in advance" even have any meaning for a ...


2

That depends on how you mean "purgatory". No one went into heaven prior (John 3:13) to the death of Christ (which opened the Kingdom of Heaven to believers (this is in the Te Deum, but it might be Biblical?)). Those who would have been considered truly righteous (Elijah, Moses, Abraham, etc.) would have been in "Abraham's bosom" (as in Luke 16:22-23), ...


2

Reading the biblical narrative, we can conclude that the good thief's sins are forgiven by Christ on the cross. And that the thief would have followed Christ if he were to live (baptism of desire). A sinner who dies after receiving baptism without atoning for his sins he will not enter purgatory. With these two reasonable assumptions, we can say that the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible