Hot answers tagged

14

The meaning is pretty obvious in context. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, ...


14

Melchizedek was the King of Salem and a high priest of God. Genesis 14:18-20 18 Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High, 19 and he blessed Abram, saying, “Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth. 20 And praise be to God Most High, who delivered your enemies into ...


13

Yeah, well no... He prefigures Jesus, the same way lots and lots of OT people do. Job/Suffering Servant from Isaiah - for suffering Moses - for leadership out of bondage Abraham/Noah - for trusting in God's providence David - for kingship Melchizedek/Aaron - for priesthood


11

Roger Ellsworth in "Opening Up the Psalms" says not to pronounce the word: The word ‘Selah’ appears seventy-four times in forty psalms. This word signifies a pause or interlude. It may have been used to inform musicians to change instruments or to call for both musicians and listeners to ponder the truth that had been sung. In the public reading of the ...


10

It simply means that Christ is uniquely special to God and has his authority. To sit at the right hand of an earthly king was a place of honor, denoting special trust, authority from, and relationship with the king. It was something that was understood without needing explanation at the time. If you were to sit at the right hand of the King meant that ...


10

He was quoting David in Psalm 22. But nevertheless, Jesus must have felt these words Himself. What it was like for the Son of God to experience "Hell", or separation from God, we can not begin to imagine. We can only speculate that Jesus, when He uttered those words, felt God had abandoned Him in a real way, not a symbolic way. Jesus truly felt separated ...


9

Great question. I think where people often struggle with this is the imposition of the assumption that hate and love are mutually exclusive. This often tends to be the case with us, but it is a result of our sinful nature. God can both hate the sinner for what he does, and still love him in many ways. Donald Carson has a great little book (free PDF) called ...


9

For the same reason so many other things from the Old Testament are mentioned in the New Testament: they're quotations. This particular one was a reference to the beginning of the 22nd psalm, and it's quite instructive to look at the psalm in its entirety. Of particular interest is verse 18, which had literally happened to him just moments ago. Jesus's ...


9

Hebrews 5:6, which quotes Psalms 110:4, is a bit more specific: 6 And in another passage God said to him, “You are a priest forever in the order of Melchizedek.” So if Jesus is a priest in the order of Melchizedek, he's obviously not Melchizedek.


8

3 Without father, without mother, without descent, having neither beginning of days, nor end of life; but made like unto the Son of God; abideth a priest continually. If he is still abiding as a priest, and has neither a beginning nor ending of days, how can he not be Jesus? I think the answer is pretty clear (simple logic really) - He is Jesus, ...


7

The quick answer, the condensed one that I hear in homilies at Mass around Holy Week is that Jesus quotes this scripture to evoke the Psalm, not just the part of the Psalm where David feels forsaken, but the part where God is glorified.


7

To bless is related to to consecrate. Both imply an act of recognizing and/or declaring and devoting something to have a particular purpose or holiness. If a father blesses his son's decision in a matter, we mean that the father supports and acknowledges the decision. If a priest blesses a marriage, he declares, with the approval of the whole Church in the ...


6

There is a difference in numbering between the Hebrew (Masoretic) text and the Greek and Latin (Septuagint and Vulgate). Psalms 9 and 10 in the Hebrew get combined into one as do Ps 114 & 115. Psalms 116 and 147 both get split in two. Most Protestant Bibles follow the Hebrew numbering while most Catholic and Orthodox ones follow the Greek. I suspect ...


6

While mortal sins require knowledge venial sins do not. One commits venial sin when, in a less serious matter, he does not observe the standard prescribed by the moral law, or when he disobeys the moral law in a grave matter, but without full knowledge or without complete consent. CCC #1862 Also, as Christians we should desire to do the right thing ...


6

To add to DJClayworth's excellent answer on the history of English translation, there has been a consistent and strong push to translate the Bible (especially the New Testament) into the vernacular see the very early days of Christianity. Below is a brief outline of the history of translation during the first millennium (minus English, which has already ...


5

TL; DR - essentially, it is a method of praising God and bringing him glory. This article addresses the very issue: There are two main things that we do when we bless the Lord. The first is synonymous with giving thanks and praise. Some translations actually say, “Give thanks to the Lord,” where others say, “Bless the Lord.” So, blessing the Lord is ...


5

Well, the Psalm doesn't look like it says anything about wrath. But if anyone starts wondering about that, point them to Matthew 5: 45, where Jesus points out that God "sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust," and also to John 9: 1-3, where Jesus explains that even when a disaster strikes a specific person, it's not necessarily an expression of God's ...


5

The following is a list of omitted verses and Chapters from the four week plaster, currently in use. It follows modern numbering. Not Septuagint numbering. Psalms Omitted Completely: Psalm 58 Psalm 83 Psalm 109 Verses Omitted from Particular Psalms: Psalm 5: 11 Psalm 21: 9-13 Psalm 28: 4-5 Psalm 31: 18-19 Psalm 40: 15-16 Psalm 54: 7 Psalm 55: 16 ...


5

Paul's Greek was ψαλμοις, υμνοις and ωδαις πνευματικαις. Thayer's Greek Lexicon (via Blue Letter Bible) has ύμνος, -ου, ο, in Greek writing from Homer down, a song in praise of gods, heroes, conquerors, [cf. Trench as below, p297], but in the Scriptures of God; a sacred song, hymn. Thayer quotes Richard Chevinix Trench's Synonyms of the New ...


5

Imprecatory Psalms John Wesley escised 34 Psalms altogether, and removed portions of another 58. To imprecate means to invoke evil upon, or curse. Imprecatory psalms, also called the cursing psalms, are those psalms that contain prayers for God's judgment on the psalmist's enemies. Examples: "Let death take my enemies by surprise; let them go down ...


5

Let's take English (and it's predecessors) as representative. Wikipedia has all your information on the existence of Bible translations into English.. Some select quotes: Toward the end of the 7th century, the Venerable Bede began a translation of scripture into Old English (also called Anglo-Saxon). Aldhelm (c. 639–709) translated the complete Book of ...


4

Yep, I just looked on amazon.co.uk to find the Divine Office published by Harper Collins for the use in the United Kingdom, New Zealand, Australia, etc... Didn't have a preview or anything, but I did find this which says: Psalms are from the 1963 version of the Grail Psalter.


4

If he is not, how could there be priests of God before God chose himself a nation and defined priesthood after the Hebrews left Egypt? Hebrews 7, which you quoted, makes it fairly clear: the Order of Melchizedek is a higher order of priesthood than the order of Aaron, which the Levites operated under. It had the power of administering the ...


3

The Lord is blessed in His very being as part of His condition or state of being (along with timeless, omnipotent, omniscient, good, etc.). We can simply announce that as a way of blessing God. “Blessed be the Lord” may by our desire that all know His "condition," or let all celebrate His blessed "condition." Noah, Abraham, et al., blessed others with a ...


3

Melchizedek was the King of Salem and a high priest of God. Genesis 14:18-20 18 Then Melchizedek king of Salem brought out bread and wine. He was priest of God Most High, 19 and he blessed Abram, saying, “Blessed be Abram by God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth. 20 And praise be to God Most High, who delivered your enemies into ...


3

I know that the Bible is the Word of God, but it may be important to remember that that particular verse was written by David; "To the Chief Musician". David did not say that he was writing a prophetic word from the Father. It was meant as a song of worship and it was written by man. I think the most outstanding proof that our Father loves us, sinners ...


2

"Right" in many cultures signify more importantly than the "Left". This is probably associated with the population of right handed is more than the left handed. Hence, people use right hand to do important things more than their left hand. "Right hand man" also means the trusted one, or the most important one. In my culture (Indonesia), it's consider rude ...


2

Foreordination is not the same as predestination. Ordination in the Bible typically refers to being set apart to the office in the Priesthood, for example, the members of the house of Aaron were ordained to take care of the tabernacle during the exodus and later the temple. A great example of someone who did not follow through with his ordination is Kind ...


2

The Pulpit Commentary given at one reference says (my emphasis): Verse 16. — Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; or, "my embryo." The Hebrew text has but the single word גלמי, which probably means, "the still unformed embryonic mass" (Hengstenberg). And in thy book all my members were written; literally, all of them; but the ...


2

If you take the entire Psalm in context, you'll see that the writer is being punished by God for some sin of which he is guilty. The situation is described in verses 7-11 (NASB): And now, Lord, for what do I wait?My hope is in You.Deliver me from all my transgressions;Make me not the reproach of the foolish.I have become mute, I do not open my ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible