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To bless is related to to consecrate. Both imply an act of recognizing and/or declaring and devoting something to have a particular purpose or holiness. If a father blesses his son's decision in a matter, we mean that the father supports and acknowledges the decision. If a priest blesses a marriage, he declares, with the approval of the whole Church in the ...


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TL; DR - essentially, it is a method of praising God and bringing him glory. This article addresses the very issue: There are two main things that we do when we bless the Lord. The first is synonymous with giving thanks and praise. Some translations actually say, “Give thanks to the Lord,” where others say, “Bless the Lord.” So, blessing the Lord is ...


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The Pulpit Commentary given at one reference says (my emphasis): Verse 16. — Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; or, "my embryo." The Hebrew text has but the single word גלמי, which probably means, "the still unformed embryonic mass" (Hengstenberg). And in thy book all my members were written; literally, all of them; but the ...


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The Lord is blessed in His very being as part of His condition or state of being (along with timeless, omnipotent, omniscient, good, etc.). We can simply announce that as a way of blessing God. “Blessed be the Lord” may by our desire that all know His "condition," or let all celebrate His blessed "condition." Noah, Abraham, et al., blessed others with a ...


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If you take the entire Psalm in context, you'll see that the writer is being punished by God for some sin of which he is guilty. The situation is described in verses 7-11 (NASB): And now, Lord, for what do I wait?My hope is in You.Deliver me from all my transgressions;Make me not the reproach of the foolish.I have become mute, I do not open my ...


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Foreordination is not the same as predestination. Ordination in the Bible typically refers to being set apart to the office in the Priesthood, for example, the members of the house of Aaron were ordained to take care of the tabernacle during the exodus and later the temple. A great example of someone who did not follow through with his ordination is Kind ...


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Reformed (i.e. Calvinist) denominations such as my denomination (Presbyterian Church in America) indeed use this verse as support for predestination, especially as it pertains to God's eternal plan (referenced here). Few Arminians use this verse as a proof text against predestination, although I did find one example: In the bible it says (Psalm 139:16) ...


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Essentially, David is calling on God (v12) to stop punishing him (v13) and save him from the consequences of his sins (v8-v11): Save me from all my transgressions;     do not make me the scorn of fools. I was silent; I would not open my mouth,     for you are the one who has done this. Remove your scourge ...


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Wow I never saw this before, great question! I don't have all the answers but regarding your question "Are these psalms composed by the same author?" They both state that they are written by David in the header. See here... http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm%2014&version=NKJV ...


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I found this link mentioning their similarity. The writer suggests it may have been an editorial adaptation since they seem to have been written at different times based on the words each uses for God (Psalm 14 = Yahweh, Psalm 53 = Elohim). It could be similar to how some old hymns are currently being updated with modern language to appeal to modern culture. ...


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First off Psalms are filled with hyperbolic phrases. The translation for this passage is much debated and commented on. I would put most of the latter parts of comments in the speculation category. They are filled with speculative arguments and implications like God planning out our lives in detail. Then the jump comes from theses speculations to things ...



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