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12

The meaning is pretty obvious in context. Ps 137 is a lament for Jerusalem after the Babylonians have invaded and destroyed it. Verses 7-9 make it explicit: 7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, ...


8

Roger Ellsworth in "Opening Up the Psalms" says not to pronounce the word: The word ‘Selah’ appears seventy-four times in forty psalms. This word signifies a pause or interlude. It may have been used to inform musicians to change instruments or to call for both musicians and listeners to ponder the truth that had been sung. In the public reading of the ...


7

Imprecatory Psalms John Wesley escised 34 Psalms altogether, and removed portions of another 58. To imprecate means to invoke evil upon, or curse. Imprecatory psalms, also called the cursing psalms, are those psalms that contain prayers for God's judgment on the psalmist's enemies. Examples: "Let death take my enemies by surprise; let them go down ...


5

Well, the Psalm doesn't look like it says anything about wrath. But if anyone starts wondering about that, point them to Matthew 5: 45, where Jesus points out that God "sendeth rain on the just and on the unjust," and also to John 9: 1-3, where Jesus explains that even when a disaster strikes a specific person, it's not necessarily an expression of God's ...


5

To bless is related to to consecrate. Both imply an act of recognizing and/or declaring and devoting something to have a particular purpose or holiness. If a father blesses his son's decision in a matter, we mean that the father supports and acknowledges the decision. If a priest blesses a marriage, he declares, with the approval of the whole Church in the ...


4

Paul's Greek was ψαλμοις, υμνοις and ωδαις πνευματικαις. Thayer's Greek Lexicon (via Blue Letter Bible) has ύμνος, -ου, ο, in Greek writing from Homer down, a song in praise of gods, heroes, conquerors, [cf. Trench as below, p297], but in the Scriptures of God; a sacred song, hymn. Thayer quotes Richard Chevinix Trench's Synonyms of the New ...


4

TL; DR - essentially, it is a method of praising God and bringing him glory. This article addresses the very issue: There are two main things that we do when we bless the Lord. The first is synonymous with giving thanks and praise. Some translations actually say, “Give thanks to the Lord,” where others say, “Bless the Lord.” So, blessing the Lord is ...


2

The Pulpit Commentary given at one reference says (my emphasis): Verse 16. — Thine eyes did see my substance, yet being unperfect; or, "my embryo." The Hebrew text has but the single word גלמי, which probably means, "the still unformed embryonic mass" (Hengstenberg). And in thy book all my members were written; literally, all of them; but the ...


2

The Lord is blessed in His very being as part of His condition or state of being (along with timeless, omnipotent, omniscient, good, etc.). We can simply announce that as a way of blessing God. “Blessed be the Lord” may by our desire that all know His "condition," or let all celebrate His blessed "condition." Noah, Abraham, et al., blessed others with a ...


2

If you take the entire Psalm in context, you'll see that the writer is being punished by God for some sin of which he is guilty. The situation is described in verses 7-11 (NASB): And now, Lord, for what do I wait?My hope is in You.Deliver me from all my transgressions;Make me not the reproach of the foolish.I have become mute, I do not open my ...


2

Foreordination is not the same as predestination. Ordination in the Bible typically refers to being set apart to the office in the Priesthood, for example, the members of the house of Aaron were ordained to take care of the tabernacle during the exodus and later the temple. A great example of someone who did not follow through with his ordination is Kind ...


2

Psalms is a collection of songs written by many people, compiled latter by some unknown editor. Though David wrote many songs, he did not write all the songs. Some songs were written before David and some after him. The Psalms were written by numerous people over 1,000 years of Israel 's history. Some of the Psalms were written as far back as the ...


1

The Asaphites that handled the worship service, possibly Levites and belonging to the priesthood, are some of those who wrote Psalms for worship other than David. Moses also wrote some Psalms, long before David. All the Psalms, written by David or others, were inspired by the Holy Spirit and therefore is the ultimate author of them all. All scripture is ...


1

Reformed (i.e. Calvinist) denominations such as my denomination (Presbyterian Church in America) indeed use this verse as support for predestination, especially as it pertains to God's eternal plan (referenced here). Few Arminians use this verse as a proof text against predestination, although I did find one example: In the bible it says (Psalm 139:16) ...


1

Essentially, David is calling on God (v12) to stop punishing him (v13) and save him from the consequences of his sins (v8-v11): Save me from all my transgressions;     do not make me the scorn of fools. I was silent; I would not open my mouth,     for you are the one who has done this. Remove your scourge ...


1

Wow I never saw this before, great question! I don't have all the answers but regarding your question "Are these psalms composed by the same author?" They both state that they are written by David in the header. See here... http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=Psalm%2014&version=NKJV ...


1

I found this link mentioning their similarity. The writer suggests it may have been an editorial adaptation since they seem to have been written at different times based on the words each uses for God (Psalm 14 = Yahweh, Psalm 53 = Elohim). It could be similar to how some old hymns are currently being updated with modern language to appeal to modern culture. ...


1

First off Psalms are filled with hyperbolic phrases. The translation for this passage is much debated and commented on. I would put most of the latter parts of comments in the speculation category. They are filled with speculative arguments and implications like God planning out our lives in detail. Then the jump comes from theses speculations to things ...


1

To me, the imagery from the psalm perfectly represents Christ's escape from the killings that were taking place shortly after his birth. The psalm pictures our soul's escape from sin through the destruction of the snare much the same way Joseph's vision foiled the trap that was laid for the Christ. That seems to give the why pretty well. As for the when, I ...


1

7 Remember, LORD, what the Edomites did on the day Jerusalem fell. “Tear it down,” they cried, “tear it down to its foundations!” 8 Daughter Babylon, doomed to destruction, happy is the one who repays you according to what you have done to us. 9 Happy is the one who seizes your infants and dashes them against the rocks. In the entire psalm, the author ...



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