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I received an MA in Old Testament from an Evangelical seminary, and some of my teachers were signers of the Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy. I can say that the MT is viewed simply as a strong witness as to what the text originally would have been. When there are different vocalizations, or textual variants based on other actual manuscripts, these are ...


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The Catholic Church has a fairly well-established attitude (and rules) towards private revelation. They're summarized in Contemplation - Revelations and visions. The first two, most important, "rules" regarding private revelation are explicitly mentioned: Firstly, the spiritual director must judge whether the revelation directs the person to deeper love of ...


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The Catholic Encyclopedia actually has a response to the reason for the Reformation: The papacy had become the powerful centre of the family of Christian nations. With the ecclesiastical organization fully developed, it came to pass that the activities of the governing ecclesiastical bodies were no longer confined to the ecclesiastical domain, but ...


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Everything is subject to God's providence, but that does not imply God necessitates everything to happen the way it does. St. Thomas Aquinas, in his Summa Theologica I q. 22 a. 4 article "Whether providence imposes any necessity on things foreseen?," answers: Divine providence imposes necessity upon some things; not upon all, as some formerly believed. ...


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I am answering the question from Evangelical Protestant perspective. The reason the universe didn't fall apart when Jesus died is that death does not mean "cessation of existence." For as the body apart from the spirit is dead, so also faith apart from works is dead. James 2:26 (ESV) James 2:26 says that death is a separation of body and ...


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Our thoughts can easily deceive us even to think what we believe is the will of God or the speaking of the Holy Spirit. 2 Thessalonians 2:11-12 And for this cause God shall send them strong delusion, that they should believe a lie: 12 That they all might be damned who believed not the truth, but had pleasure in unrighteousness. Until we come to a ...


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To answer the O.P.’s question directly, there is no ontological difference between Divine Providence and the Holy Spirit. God (or, if you will, the Divine Essence) is identical with His attributes—including Providence—and also with each one of the Persons. (The best exposition of this idea is St. Thomas Aquinas’ Summa theolgia, I, q. 3, a. 3; and I, q. 39, ...


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One Theory: It's possible that the Jews (which Jews? There's not just one body of "orthodox" Jews.) do not wish to endorse the Christian idea of the Trinity. The Holy Spirit is not exactly described as a divine person in the OT. "Spirit" and "Spirit of God" are used, but not really in the same sense as "Holy Spirit" is used in the NT. Perhaps alluding to ...



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