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No one today has actually seen Jesus in the flesh, Christian's do not believe in his sacrifice because they have physically seen him. We believe because God himself has opened our eyes to the truth, and we have recieved the Holy Spirit that allows us to see the great wonders of this world. Jesus does not say that Peter is the rock, he said on this rock, ...


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Chapter 18 of Matthew explains it pretty clearly that these little ones are not only referring to children, but to those who believe in Jesus and humbles himself as a little child. 2 He called a little child to him, and placed the child among them. 3 And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never ...


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What do Protestant churches teach about the fate of deceased infants? Although this subject can be woven into the various doctrines of infant baptism, most Protestants would look to a biblical basis for their doctrine. The only verse that comes close to describing a specific teaching on this describes David’s reaction to the loss of his son; 2 Samuel 12:...


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What you are actually asking (but might not realize) is when was regeneration first associated with the moment of 'first' having faith, rather than at the time of baptism. 'Born again' and 'regeneration' have always been synonymous or at least the initial point of regeneration. So unfortunately we have to trace attitudes of baptism with respect to ...


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A common theme in the New Testament is rebirth in salvation through Christ. So the idea of being "born again" isn't all that cryptic. To specifically address your question of why we equate a new spiritual birth with the point of salvation, I'll direct you to a few scriptures. First, we must clarify what the point of salvation actually is: Romans 10:9-10 ...


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Nathaniel's answer above is the correct one, but I would like to give another perspective. I think it is worthwhile to contrast writings of Presbyterianism's biggest hero (John Calvin) with modern teachings from Evangelicalsism's biggest hero (Billy Graham, or at least his website) to draw some distinctions. To get a good summary of the soteriology of the ...


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As you mention, evangelicalism refers to a movement that typically emphasizes salvation through faith in Christ, the authority of the Bible, evangelism, and a conversion experience. On the other hand, presbyterianism refers primarily to a form of church government. In this system, elders rule the church – a session of elders is responsible for leading ...


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Opponents to the KJV-Only position generally don’t disparage the King James Version (KJV) or treat it as necessarily inferior to contemporary English translations, but instead point out that it faces many of the same challenges and errors that face any English translation. Depending on the opponent you ask, each will probably tell you one of any number of ...


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The salvation of infants within Protestant denominations cover a wide range of alternate views. The subject is closely related to different view of infant baptism but not identical. To avoid the subject of how baptism has its role in the subject, I would like to limit the scenario to a child that dies before having a chance of being baptized. To keep ...


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From your referenced Chicago Statement on Biblical Inerrancy, specifically because of the many scholars who signed it, I think the answer can be brought out with the following commentary and examples. This concept/question doesn't only apply to Paul, but also to other characters (including Satan, often misquoting scripture--although as you point out, this ...


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The more liberal mainline denominations and progressive churches are much more likely to include Mormons as Christians since they typically do not make orthodoxy (right belief) the end all and be all. They believe orthopraxy (right living) trumps orthodoxy. They tend not to make acceptance of well-developed systematic theological conclusions as a litmus test ...



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