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25

Good question with a simple answer: No. Categorically no. All mainline Protestants (and actually most branches of Christianity including Catholic and Orthodox) believe that they are radically different. "Categorically" different if I may overload that word. Jesus is God. Son of God in that he is the "son" part of the Trinity, but the very person of God, ...


20

Protestants do not see that Christ ever instructed his followers to pray (only to baptize) "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit". On the other hand, Christians are repeatedly called to invoke the name of the Lord: To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be his holy people, together ...


13

Why do Protestants teach the non-necessity of baptism for salvation? Those who see baptism as something additional to salvation might use the following verses; Luke 23:43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. The thief on the cross was not baptized. 1 Corinthians 1:17 For Christ sent me not ...


12

First, it is valuable in this answer to distinguish between the pious practice of individuals, and small groups of believers, on the one hand, and the official formularies of the larger group, on the other. It may be that among Roman Catholics, there are those who use the full Trinitarian formula to begin and end an individual prayer, and perhaps every ...


10

Let me state the views of those who believe baptism is not necessary for salvation. (It's not just Protestants by the way - Catholics teach that actual physical baptism is not absolutely necessary for salvation. There are several circumstances where substitutes for it are acceptable). "Born of water" might mean several things other than baptism. It might ...


9

Credo-baptists (note: not all Protestants) that hold the views you refer to, rely more on very clear soteriological proof texts that are not as open to alternative interpretations* as the verses you have cited such as: 8 For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— 9 not by works, so that ...


8

Intercession is not the same as mediation! As other answers have said perfectly adequately, there is plenty of biblical support for interceding for one another and the example of the Apostle Paul requesting this intercession from other (living!) saints; although there is no particular scriptural warrant to explicitly endorse asking for such intercession ...


8

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


7

Protestants believe that Jesus wants them to pray "in Jesus' name" and they would cite the following verses to warrant their belief: John 14:13-14 ESV Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it. John 14:26 ESV But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the ...


7

For most Protestants this is a matter of semantics. Protestants know full well that Catholics call Mary, the "Blessed Mother." They also know that if you ask a Catholic "Is Mary blessed?" They would surely answer "Yes, indeed she is." But the Catholic should understand that the Protestant, in general, would also answer the same. Mary is blessed. Mary ...


7

Your question is a good one, but it is slightly misguided. You are seeking a precise definition for a term which does not have one. The word Protestant can mean different things depending on the context in which it is used. When used in a historical context, it may be used to strictly refer to those involved in the Reformation and to the churches that ...


7

This question at first seemed like a non sequitur to me, but it actually comes from an interesting place. The Eastern Orthodox churches use the Greek word μυστήριον (musterion) to refer to sacraments, but the word actually means 'mystery', and many Orthodox would prefer the term Sacred Mystery over sacrament. Ephesians 5:31-32 says that the joining of a man ...


6

I have been asked this because I am an LDS missionary, and I would say no we aren't protestant. The word as far as I understand it is referring to a group protesting the beliefs of the Catholic church. We aren't protesting anything, but we believe in a Restoration of knowledge through prophets.


6

What a fascinating question - Was the Protestant Reformation a bottom-up or top-down reformation? It would seem the only reasonable answer is - Yes! (i.e. both) The progress of the Reformation in Scotland showed all the hallmarks of the former - cf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_knox : John Knox (c. 1514 – 24 November 1572) was a Scottish ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


6

The statement of "choosing to go to hell" is an over-simplification that really is an example of intellectual laziness, and is a great example of the difference between the "true theology" of a group and the type of pop-theology that springs up and causes great confusion. Looking at it from any side, saying that people choose to go to hell does not make ...


6

There were many people involved in the formation of the Anglican church, and they had different purposes for it. The most prominent initial issue was of course Henry VIII's desire to get a divorce. But equally significant was the authority of Rome in England: Henry passed laws prohibiting legal appeals to Rome, and removing the church's authority to make ...


5

The following tools are good for determining what the bible says about a matter. Take, for example, this question about pets going to heaven. If you wanted to know the answer, you should consult: 1. A Concordance The first tool that just about any pastor is going to use to answer a question such as this is a concordance. A concordance is nothing more ...


5

The enquiry is about the policy of Protestant denominations on the choice of baptismal names. I am an ordained minister (Presbyter) of the British Methodist Church with thirty years' experience. In the Methodist Church, this matter would be up to the judgment of the officiating minister's conscience, though parents could appeal to superior authorities in ...


5

These two slogans were used to explain two major disagreements Protestants had with what the Catholic Church was teaching, and yes, they are designed to work together! They don't compete, they are alone in their own respective fields. Sola Fide refers to the belief that works are not a means or prerequisite for salvation. People are declared to be justified ...


4

There are no shortcuts to the process you appear to be asking about. I say that through personal experience, and from many Bible enthusiasts I have known and collaborated with over the years. There are some excellent aids to enhance your Bible study free on the internet, some are online Bible study, and for the novice there are some excellent interactive ...


4

Absolute certainty probably isn't attainable (whether absolute certainty is or should be considered attainable by humans at all might be a worthwhile question), but as brought up in Affable Geek's answer to the inciting question, you can get pretty close through use of a good concordance and topical Bible dictionary. Concordances are lists of words used. ...


4

We don't consider ourselves protestant, but the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, with all the principals, ordinances and priesthood power that the Savior established during his mortal ministry. 2 Thessalonians 2:3 refers to a falling away. The truth was lost and needed to be restored. Acts 3:21 speaks of a restitution of all things. We believe that through ...


4

Pentecost is called the "Church's birthday" for a reason, and that reason is the Holy Spirit. As for the idea of "Was He quiet the whole time since the first century?" Um, no. The Protestant Reformation was just that - a re-formation of the original church. While we may disagree about what it means to be the first church, we acknowledge that we are ...


4

Commentator Albert Barnes has some thoughts. First he points to Hebrews 1:14. The entire verse and his commentary are worth reading but here are some excerpts. Are they [angels] not all ministering spirits, sent forth to minister for them who shall be heirs of salvation? Are they not all - There is not one of them that is elevated to the high rank ...


4

There are two main ways that Prophets and Apostles can be considered the foundation of the Church - their role in receiving and transmitting revelation (scripture) and their effectual ministry for Christ (service) - particularly in founding individual congregations. Christ's role in the foundation is unique - he is the chief cornerstone (cf Ephesians 2:20): ...


4

There is not any real difference between the Catholic teaching on inerrancy of Scripture and the generic "Protestant" view given in the answer above. The two definitive documents in recent history are probably Pope Leo XIII's encyclical Providentissiumus Deus and the Second Vatican Council Document Dei Verbum. These points more or less summarize the position ...


4

The choice of Sunday is traditional, but it is also harmonious with the Biblical account (emphasis added): Acts 20:7 NASB On the first day of the week, when we were gathered together to break bread, Paul began talking to them, intending to leave the next day, and he prolonged his message until midnight. 1 Corinthians 16:2 (NASB) On the first day ...


3

I think it would also be helpful to say that 'salvation by faith' is not something that only Paul talks about. He maintained that this had its bases in Old Testament scripture too when he quoted Genesis 15:6, 'And he [Abraham] believed in the LORD; and he counted it to him for righteousness' (AV/KJV). This is at a time way before the Law had been delivered ...


3

"What are the differences between Apostles, Prophets, Peter and Jesus Christ in being the “foundation” whereon the church is built?" I noticed in the book of Revelation, that Peter and the Apostles are listed and named as the foundation stones in the protective wall of the New Jerusalem. The first foundation stone in the protective wall is Jasper, which ...



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