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15

Protestants basically fall into three main camps, claiming that the unpardonable sin is: asserting, during Christ's life on earth, that his works were of the devil; or, refusal to repent even to the end of one's life; or, hatefully and willfully slandering the Holy Spirit's testimony of Christ. Within (3), there are three views regarding who can ...


12

CARM has said a few things about Joyce Meyer and has called some of her teachings heresy. [CARM was] glad to see an affirmation [in Meyer's teachings] of the Trinity, that man is a sinner, that without Jesus we can have no relationship with God, that salvation is a free gift, and eternal hell of conscious damnation. Some things Meyer has said that CARM ...


12

Luther and Calvin Protestant negativity toward monasticism can be traced back to the Reformers, particularly Martin Luther. Luther was himself a monk, and after his conversion, he became progressively more opposed to the practice. In 1537, he wrote that monastic vows "must be absolutely abolished." He also frequently and enthusiastically attacked ...


12

Protestant critiques of Swedenborgianism first appeared shortly after the publications of his spiritual writings in the middle of the 18th century. Protestant theologians focused most closely on his teachings and those of his followers through the 19th century, and since then have afforded Swedenborgianism relatively little attention.1 The primary ...


12

Those who argue against images of Jesus do so primarily in two ways: (1) that any image of Christ is necessarily inadequate and false and (2) that images of Christ inspire worship and devalue the Word of God. Images of Christ inadequate and false Advocates of this position regularly appeal to the incomprehensibility of God. John Calvin1 and J. I. Packer2 ...


9

The consensus among Protestants is that some sins are worse than others, but even the smallest sin deserves God's wrath. Or, put another way, sins are equally damning, but not equally heinous. The Westminster Shorter Catechism puts it succinctly: Every sin deserves God's wrath and curse, both in this life, and that which is to come. (Answer 84) ...


8

This question at first seemed like a non sequitur to me, but it actually comes from an interesting place. The Eastern Orthodox churches use the Greek word μυστήριον (musterion) to refer to sacraments, but the word actually means 'mystery', and many Orthodox would prefer the term Sacred Mystery over sacrament. Ephesians 5:31-32 says that the joining of a man ...


8

I intend to respond considering primarily the 'mainstream' Protestant denominations, with minimal (if any) reference to the more obscure sects. This is because I think the term 'Protestant' belongs to those who accept a handful of certain beliefs (trinity, faith-centered outlook, etc) that are often not present in the more rare denominations. Referring to ...


7

Within Protestantism there are many views regarding the proper way to keep the Sabbath, even among those who generally agree that Sunday is the most appropriate day to observe it. I'll provide a brief overview of three of the main views: Spiritual Sabbath, Continental Sabbath, and Puritan Sabbath. Spiritual Sabbath This view is held by many Protestants ...


7

Your question is a good one, but it is slightly misguided. You are seeking a precise definition for a term which does not have one. The word Protestant can mean different things depending on the context in which it is used. When used in a historical context, it may be used to strictly refer to those involved in the Reformation and to the churches that ...


6

Both Luther and the Rosicrucians have written about what the emblems represent, and the explanations differ quite a bit. In a 1530 letter to Lazarus Spengler, Luther wrote: Such a heart should stand in the middle of a white rose, to show that faith gives joy, comfort, and peace. In other words, it places the believer into a white, joyous rose, for this ...


6

There were many people involved in the formation of the Anglican church, and they had different purposes for it. The most prominent initial issue was of course Henry VIII's desire to get a divorce. But equally significant was the authority of Rome in England: Henry passed laws prohibiting legal appeals to Rome, and removing the church's authority to make ...


6

Below I have reproduced a table from a 2011 Pew study on Christian Movements and Denominations which used data from the Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary Center for the Study of Global Christianity. +-----------------------------------------------------+-------------------------------+ | Denominational family | Percentage of ...


6

The key issues seem to be in the Code of Canon Law, Chapter VI, canon 1125, which says in part: 1/ the Catholic party is to declare that he or she is prepared to remove dangers of defecting from the faith and is to make a sincere promise to do all in his or her power so that all offspring are baptized and brought up in the Catholic Church; 2/ the ...


5

There are two common interpretations among Protestants: "Wisdom" refers to the Word of God; that is, Jesus "Wisdom" is the personification of a divine attribute, and perhaps a type of Christ, but should not be understood to be Jesus himself The first view was widely held by the church fathers and several centuries of Protestants. However, in the 20th ...


5

This is a fantastic question. Here's my answer. Firstly, I would argue that the definition you use from Oxford English Dictionary is actually not as encompassing of the actual theology as it could be. Going against Oxford English Dictionary is a bold claim, so I'll provide another definition. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy “Panentheism” is a ...


5

If you look hard enough you can always find similarities. The correspondences between Mary and the Ark of the Covenant remind me a lot of Islamic arguments that Muhammad was the prophet Moses prophesied about in Deuteronomy 18:18-22 rather than Jesus. According to Muslim apologists, there are many similarities between Moses and Muhammad, many of which do ...


4

Attendance at a Protestant church, even on a regular basis, does not detract from a baptized Catholic's Catholic identity in the eyes of the Church, and they are still obligated to follow the laws of the Church and the directives of their bishop and pastor: Merely ecclesiastical laws bind those who have been baptized in the Catholic Church or received ...


4

To answer your main question: The Council of Laodicea, being a regional council, would only have been binding on the Faithful living in the region (specifically, on areas that were represented by their bishops). Being only a regional, and not an ecumenical council, it is not binding on all the Faithful. For your question about scripture, the answer is a ...


4

The simplifying or outright dismantling of liturgies has been in train since the beginning of the Reformation, particularly as it started to unfold in Switzerland under Huldrych Zwingli. From the linked Wikipedia article: Shortly before Easter (1525), Zwingli and his closest associates requested the council to cancel the mass and to introduce the new ...


4

Because although Christians cannot lose their salvation, they can still appear before the Lord in shame rather than in confidence (1 John 2:28). The good shepherds who watch over the flock want them to enter into the best the Lord has for them, and not be "scarcely saved" (1 Peter 4:17-18). Not all Christians will inherit a crown and rule with Christ; that ...


3

Many of the Reformation confessions (statements of belief) mention an Apocrypha, but most do not explicitly give a list of non-canonical books. Two do however, which I have quoted below. Most of those non-canonical books are in the Catholic canon, but three are not: the Prayer of Manasseh and 3rd and 4th Esdras (sometimes confusingly called 1st and 2nd ...


3

Humans love to categorise things, and we normally think of categories as dividing things up with borders between the categories. But that isn't actually how we normally do conceptualise our categories - instead we categorise things according to their likeness to archetypes or prototypes, the central most typical examples of a category. The borders between ...


3

Protestants have answered this question in several different ways: That within the Trinity, the Son is eternally subordinate to the Father, though equal with him in essence That Christ here specifically refers to his human nature That the Son is lower than the Father in his role as mediator between God and Man That in his present state of humiliation, he ...


3

There will likely be as many different answers to your question as there are denominations. From an Evangelical perspective, I'd venture a guess that ecumenism is a "hard sell" in many Evangelical denominations of whatever stripe. (I would not even dare to give you a list of Evangelical denominations!) I happen to be a member of the Christian and ...


3

During the early years of the Reformation "scholasticism" was a word thrown about as something of an insult toward the Roman Catholic Church. Scholasticism identifies the traditional approach (at least through the medieval time period) to developing theology and understanding scripture. And because Reformers were rejecting almost all things Catholic, the ...


3

Protestants actually provide a variety of interpretations of this passage. The "easy" answer, that this refers to the "unforgivable sin," is held by some, but others argue that the case for that interpretation is weak, and suggest several alternatives. A couple of notes to begin: Protestant definitions of the unforgivable sin vary significantly, and ...


3

One of the points of theology that has traditionally separated some Protestants from our Roman and Eastern brothers and sisters is the question of the perpetual virginity of the Blessed Mary. The argument is usually cast as a typical reformed – catholic debate with the issue of biblical authority vs. authority of tradition at the center of it. I however I ...


3

I believe the correct answer is that there is no such term that has attained any significant level of recognition. That said, the largely unrecognised terms Ancient-rite Christians / Ancient-rite Churches may be suitable for what you are seeking although they wouldn't exclude Oriental Orthodoxy if that is an important distinction. We could no doubt ...


3

Prohibited participation in sacred rites of non-Catholics (communicatio in sacris) is "to be punished with a just penalty," according to the 1983 Code of Canon Law (Can. 1365). The 1917 Code says: Can. 1258 §1. It is not licit for the faithful by any manner to assist actively or to have a part in the sacred [rites] of non-Catholics Thus, for a Catholic ...



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