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25

Good question with a simple answer: No. Categorically no. All mainline Protestants (and actually most branches of Christianity including Catholic and Orthodox) believe that they are radically different. "Categorically" different if I may overload that word. Jesus is God. Son of God in that he is the "son" part of the Trinity, but the very person of God, ...


20

Protestants do not see that Christ ever instructed his followers to pray (only to baptize) "in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit". On the other hand, Christians are repeatedly called to invoke the name of the Lord: To the church of God in Corinth, to those sanctified in Christ Jesus and called to be his holy people, together ...


14

Born-again protestant Christians are not "against" Mary of Nazareth. Every one of them accepts Mary as the Mother of Jesus, and while few would use the phrase, they have no issue with the concept of Mary as the Mother of God. That said, all but a few protestants, including nearly all who would self-identify as "born-again" reject most of the teachings about ...


12

First, it is valuable in this answer to distinguish between the pious practice of individuals, and small groups of believers, on the one hand, and the official formularies of the larger group, on the other. It may be that among Roman Catholics, there are those who use the full Trinitarian formula to begin and end an individual prayer, and perhaps every ...


12

Why do Protestants teach the non-necessity of baptism for salvation? Those who see baptism as something additional to salvation might use the following verses; Luke 23:43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. The thief on the cross was not baptized. 1 Corinthians 1:17 For Christ sent me not ...


10

Let me state the views of those who believe baptism is not necessary for salvation. (It's not just Protestants by the way - Catholics teach that actual physical baptism is not absolutely necessary for salvation. There are several circumstances where substitutes for it are acceptable). "Born of water" might mean several things other than baptism. It might ...


9

Credo-baptists (note: not all Protestants) that hold the views you refer to, rely more on very clear soteriological proof texts that are not as open to alternative interpretations* as the verses you have cited such as: 8 For it is by grace you have been saved, through faith—and this is not from yourselves, it is the gift of God— 9 not by works, so that ...


8

Intercession is not the same as mediation! As other answers have said perfectly adequately, there is plenty of biblical support for interceding for one another and the example of the Apostle Paul requesting this intercession from other (living!) saints; although there is no particular scriptural warrant to explicitly endorse asking for such intercession ...


8

Protestantism is so broad that you can't avoid getting a broad answer. As the protestant church has no official head there is no official answer and there was never an official LOTH rejection meeting. Furthermore, some Protestant denominations still do practice LOTH. The best you can do in this case is summarize the most common Protestant beliefs and come up ...


7

I have actually seen some Protestant churches like Assembly of God practicing this Holy Kiss but not very often. It depends on the pastor of the church. There is no rule for practicing Holy Kiss in many Protestant churches whether it should be practiced or not. Some encourage it, some ignore it. An example of encouraging Greeting of any form in Assembly of ...


7

The core difference between LDS doctrine and Protestantism really is the core of Mormonism. Protestants believe that the Church as established by Christ fell into apostasy and needed to be reformed, requiring a return to the true doctrine of Jesus Christ by adhering closely to the doctrines described in the Bible. Latter-Day Saints, on the other hand, ...


7

Protestants believe that Jesus wants them to pray "in Jesus' name" and they would cite the following verses to warrant their belief: John 14:13-14 ESV Whatever you ask in my name, this I will do, that the Father may be glorified in the Son. If you ask me anything in my name, I will do it. John 14:26 ESV But the Helper, the Holy Spirit, whom the ...


7

For most Protestants this is a matter of semantics. Protestants know full well that Catholics call Mary, the "Blessed Mother." They also know that if you ask a Catholic "Is Mary blessed?" They would surely answer "Yes, indeed she is." But the Catholic should understand that the Protestant, in general, would also answer the same. Mary is blessed. Mary ...


7

Your question is a good one, but it is slightly misguided. You are seeking a precise definition for a term which does not have one. The word Protestant can mean different things depending on the context in which it is used. When used in a historical context, it may be used to strictly refer to those involved in the Reformation and to the churches that ...


6

I have been asked this because I am an LDS missionary, and I would say no we aren't protestant. The word as far as I understand it is referring to a group protesting the beliefs of the Catholic church. We aren't protesting anything, but we believe in a Restoration of knowledge through prophets.


6

Protestants regard Mary as an honored servant of God. Generally they think the Roman and Orthodox churches are somewhat excessive with doctrines which are not found in the Bible and which place Mary above the status of a righteous person who nevertheless had faults. My apologies for those who are argumentative about it. Mary is a blessed woman who was ...


6

What a fascinating question - Was the Protestant Reformation a bottom-up or top-down reformation? It would seem the only reasonable answer is - Yes! (i.e. both) The progress of the Reformation in Scotland showed all the hallmarks of the former - cf. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_knox : John Knox (c. 1514 – 24 November 1572) was a Scottish ...


6

The primary distinction which you will find among protestants regarding this matter will arise from the division between those adhering to Covenant Theology and those adhering to Dispensationalism. Under Covenant Theology, the members of the modern-day church are viewed as the true children of Israel. The promises made to Abraham regarding his descendants, ...


6

The statement of "choosing to go to hell" is an over-simplification that really is an example of intellectual laziness, and is a great example of the difference between the "true theology" of a group and the type of pop-theology that springs up and causes great confusion. Looking at it from any side, saying that people choose to go to hell does not make ...


5

The following tools are good for determining what the bible says about a matter. Take, for example, this question about pets going to heaven. If you wanted to know the answer, you should consult: 1. A Concordance The first tool that just about any pastor is going to use to answer a question such as this is a concordance. A concordance is nothing more ...


5

The enquiry is about the policy of Protestant denominations on the choice of baptismal names. I am an ordained minister (Presbyter) of the British Methodist Church with thirty years' experience. In the Methodist Church, this matter would be up to the judgment of the officiating minister's conscience, though parents could appeal to superior authorities in ...


5

These two slogans were used to explain two major disagreements Protestants had with what the Catholic Church was teaching, and yes, they are designed to work together! They don't compete, they are alone in their own respective fields. Sola Fide refers to the belief that works are not a means or prerequisite for salvation. People are declared to be justified ...


5

There were many people involved in the formation of the Anglican church, and they had different purposes for it. The most prominent initial issue was of course Henry VIII's desire to get a divorce. But equally significant was the authority of Rome in England: Henry passed laws prohibiting legal appeals to Rome, and removing the church's authority to make ...


4

The scriptures consistently portray marriage as the only valid vehicle of sexual expression: Let marriage be held in honor among all, and let the marriage bed be undefiled, for God will judge the sexually immoral and adulterous. - Hebrews 13:4 ESV (Also cf 1 Corinthians 6:9-20) Although the scriptures are not explicit wtih regard to masturbation, many ...


4

We don't consider ourselves protestant, but the restored gospel of Jesus Christ, with all the principals, ordinances and priesthood power that the Savior established during his mortal ministry. 2 Thessalonians 2:3 refers to a falling away. The truth was lost and needed to be restored. Acts 3:21 speaks of a restitution of all things. We believe that through ...


4

The answer is provided in one of the passages you quoted: Or do you not know that wrongdoers will not inherit the kingdom of God? Do not be deceived: Neither the sexually immoral nor idolaters nor adulterers nor men who have sex with men nor thieves nor the greedy nor drunkards nor slanderers nor swindlers will inherit the kingdom of God. And that is ...


4

You are actually asking numerous questions in this question, so I will just summarize the answer and then address each verse you listed. Summary: The protestant view does not link works with grace as the Roman Catholics do. Protestants that believe in once saved always saved (arguable the majority) hold to the doctrine of justification by faith apart from ...


4

First, there is a framework in the Bible to help believers identify themselves as being ‘genuine’ or not. However, although this framework is infallible to guide the elect into an 'assurance of salvation' it provides no reliable means to an unbeliever. A wicked soul can and will deceive themselves as part of the curse they are under. Secondly, this framework ...


4

The strongest restriction is that the priests of the Israelite nation could only be from the tribe of Levi, and specifically on descendants of Aaron. Some verses showing this include Numbers 3:10, 3:38 and 16:40: ... This was to remind the Israelites that no one except a descendant of Aaron should come to burn incense before the Lord ... The kingship ...


4

Absolute certainty probably isn't attainable (whether absolute certainty is or should be considered attainable by humans at all might be a worthwhile question), but as brought up in Affable Geek's answer to the inciting question, you can get pretty close through use of a good concordance and topical Bible dictionary. Concordances are lists of words used. ...



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