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Your question is a good one, but it is slightly misguided. You are seeking a precise definition for a term which does not have one. The word Protestant can mean different things depending on the context in which it is used. When used in a historical context, it may be used to strictly refer to those involved in the Reformation and to the churches that ...


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Many of the Reformation confessions (statements of belief) mention an Apocrypha, but most do not explicitly give a list of non-canonical books. Two do however, which I have quoted below. Most of those non-canonical books are in the Catholic canon, but three are not: the Prayer of Manasseh and 3rd and 4th Esdras (sometimes confusingly called 1st and 2nd ...


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The latter (the broad) definition is wrong because it results in a heterogeneous set of groups that have nothing in common, and majority of them having no connection to the Reformation. Historically, Protestantism and the Reformation cannot be separated. For a reasonable definition we must examine what is common to Protestants, and how much of that is ...


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As far as I know, all Protestants adhere to the five solas, including sola scriptura, meaning that the Bible alone is the final and highest authority, the Bible being the 27 books of the New Testament and the 39 books of the Old Testament. Protestants consider this the final and complete revelation, so they wouldn't be adding any books to it. The Protestant ...



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