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6

The core difference between LDS doctrine and Protestantism really is the core of Mormonism. Protestants believe that the Church as established by Christ fell into apostasy and needed to be reformed, requiring a return to the true doctrine of Jesus Christ by adhering closely to the doctrines described in the Bible. Latter-Day Saints, on the other hand, ...


5

The following tools are good for determining what the bible says about a matter. Take, for example, this question about pets going to heaven. If you wanted to know the answer, you should consult: 1. A Concordance The first tool that just about any pastor is going to use to answer a question such as this is a concordance. A concordance is nothing more ...


4

Absolute certainty probably isn't attainable (whether absolute certainty is or should be considered attainable by humans at all might be a worthwhile question), but as brought up in Affable Geek's answer to the inciting question, you can get pretty close through use of a good concordance and topical Bible dictionary. Concordances are lists of words used. ...


3

There are no shortcuts to the process you appear to be asking about. I say that through personal experience, and from many Bible enthusiasts I have known and collaborated with over the years. There are some excellent aids to enhance your Bible study free on the internet, some are online Bible study, and for the novice there are some excellent interactive ...


3

From the other side of the coin, the most salient problem with labeling the LDS church as "Protestant" is that the LDS Church itself explicitly rejects the Nicene Creed. According to the Scriptures of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints - Pearl of Great Price, Joseph Smith -- History; I quote the following from verse 19 in answer to ...


3

I think it would also be helpful to say that 'salvation by faith' is not something that only Paul talks about. He maintained that this had its bases in Old Testament scripture too when he quoted Genesis 15:6, 'And he [Abraham] believed in the LORD; and he counted it to him for righteousness' (AV/KJV). This is at a time way before the Law had been delivered ...


2

Most Christians will likely agree on the basic principle that the Children of Israel, down to the present day have a special relationship with God, but that at this stage, we don't know what that relationship is, exactly. Jesus' parable of the workers in the vineyard (cf. Matthew 20:1 ff.) might apply here, with the Children of Israel representing those ...


2

My short answer is yes, they are compatible but you're correct to observe a shift in emphasis. The reason for the divergence in eastern and western thought is that in the Bible there are a variety of different analogies and explanations for the nature of salvation. The west at some point latched more onto the juridicial/courtroom analogies, while the east ...


1

God does in fact have a special relationship with the Jewish people. That special relationship stems from the fact that Israel is God's chosen nation (the nation through which God would bring Salvation to the world). And Looking back at History we find that that relationship began with Abraham: All Scripture is quoted from the King James translation ...


1

Theosis is really more of a non-issue. Comparing two faiths with (more or less) the same scriptures means that this is going to have some extra-scriptural material. These are some well-researched, thoughtful articles on the subject. Becoming like God: Am Evangelical Doctrine of Theosis The idea of divinization, of redeemed human nature somehow ...


1

The sacrament of confession (or penance or reconcilliation) was not specifically instituted by any of the Gospels. However, all four Gospels address the forgiveness of sin and the sacrament is entirely consistent with what Jesus is purported to have said and done. This is evidenced not only by John 20:22-23, but on the other Gospel accounts of Jesus ...


1

Simply to add to the answer given by Geremia... It is quite possible to consistently believe that "outside of The [Catholic] Church there is no salvation", and square it away with some of the more inclusive statements that Popes have spoken recently. For consistency's sake one must believe this statement in the same way that Catholics believe the following ...


1

Another theologian who anticipated some of the important thoughts of the Reformation, including sola gratia, was Bernard of Clairvaux (1090-1153), who was frequently cited by both Luther and Calvin.



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