Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

This is a difficult question, given that human reasoning is itself flawed. But if we were to look at the canonization process, the most we could say is that it must be not be absurd; Consider how Matthias was chosen to succeed Judas; even though the process of 'drawing lots' seems irrational, the lots were being drawn against a few possible candidates and ...


11

Some major problems with "KJV-onlyism" lies in the assumptions it makes and some of which you enumerated. From an evangelical perspective, we accept the idea that the Bible is, indeed, the word of God. Specifically, "men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit." 20 knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from ...


7

Note that this answer refers to the Protestant Bible. The Catholic Bible, and the Eastern Orthodox Bibles largely follow this pattern, but contain different books. More on the differences can be found here. The differences are also noted below. First, understand that the Bible is not a single book It's a collection of 66 books, written at different ...


6

It should be noted that the Apocrypha is still included in the Catholic versions of the Bible. They are just omitted in Protestant Bibles. As David Laberge pointed out, these books were never recognized by the Jews as being authoritative or on the same level as Scripture. The 1611 version of the King James Bible--which was widely used by Catholic and ...


6

These books of the Bible were accepted as part of the canon (part of the Bible). These books have been around for a long time. First of all, the books called apocrypha are related to the Old Testament. The New Testament is accepted with its 27 books among the major Christianity branches (Catholics, Protestants, Evangelicals). The Old Testament Canon was ...


6

I think the other answers so far are missing the force of the question. Obviously we wouldn't include something in the canon just because it was found in the dead sea scrolls, or because it was written in Hebrew. But finding older, Hebrew-language copies of a text (Sirach, for example) whose canonicity is already in dispute could be an argument in its favor. ...


6

They're sorted chronologically within their particular subject matters. First, the 5 books of the Pentetuch are packed together, these are all fairly chronological. Then, comes the narrative history of the kingdom of Israel ( all of Jesus' glorious, inglorious and vainglorious ancestors) culminating with the exile and return of the Jews to their ...


5

According to When Skeptics Ask (Normal L. Geisler and Ronald M. Brooks, 1990 Baker Books): The following books were in question at one point or another: Hebrews because the author is unknown. However, it was accepted as having apostolic authority, if not apostolic authorship. James because of conflict with Pauls teaching about salvation by faith alone. ...


5

No, the Dead Sea Scrolls have no effect on the Protestant view of Old Testament canon. Let's take a look at what different books are included: Old Testament (protocanonical) books Genesis, Psalms, Isaiah etc. Deuterocanonical books Letter of Jeremiah, Wisdom of Sirach etc. Other writings Book of Noah Book of Giants Testament of Naphtali Community ...


4

I don't think there's any reason to suppose he restricted healings or other miracles to the sabbath. It seems he was much more free with his healings (cf. Mat. 9:35ff) and with his commands about healing (cf. Mat. 10:7f). But one instance is enough to disprove the hypothesis: Jesus healed the ear of the servant in Luke 22:49f. Then according to 22:66, he ...


4

Perhaps two of the most famous minor prophets will illustrate that prophecy is not so much about telling the future as the present. Jonah, for example, only issues a single proclamation about the future - "Forty days, and Nineveh will be destroyed," - and even that one ends up not coming to pass because of God's grace. Amos, another prophet, makes very few ...


4

The Dead Sea Scroll find was not so much finding a copy of a book as it was finding a library. The texts found included canonical, deuterocanonical, apocraphal and other unrelated works from the time. The find had significant implications for dating other texts and verifying the integrity of some manuscripts, but did not hold any implications for the scope ...


3

There is no such verse in the Bible. The reference to spilling one's seed on the ground comes from Genesis 38:9 NASB: Onan knew that the offspring would not be his; so when he went in to his brother's wife, he wasted his seed on the ground in order not give offspring to his brother. From here. There's a fuller explanation from the site I linked to ...


3

"Prophecy" has at least verbal two connotations in the Bible - fore-telling and forth-telling. Merriam-Webster defines the verb thusly: V| to utter by or as if by divine inspiration; to predict with assurance or on the basis of mystic knowledge; to give instruction in religious matters {preach} Foretelling Foretelling is saying what the future will ...


3

Sometimes alternate post are not competing with original posts only complimenting them. I seek to compliment and amplify Affable’s post which has already more simply stated. Partly to help me straighten it out in my own mind! I am gathering my results to your question more from a word study using the Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, Gerhard ...


2

A prophet is someone God chooses to speak through. As others have said, sometimes this is foretelling the future, but more commonly God uses the prophets to speak about the present time. I will raise up for them a prophet like you from among their fellow Israelites, and I will put my words in his mouth. He will tell them everything I command him. (Deut ...


2

Robert Warren has written the Healthy Churches Handbook, which provides a checklist for identifying the health of a church. The Seven Marks of a Healthy Church are listed in Appendix 4 and have been summarised by the Diocese of London: Energized by faith rather than just keeping things going or trying to survive • worship and ...


2

Because your questions has a "What would Jesus do?" flavor, I'm going to answer in keeping: In Matthew 25:31-46 we find there will be those who show up at the judgement and discover they were an outsider even though they did all sorts of work in the name of Jesus thinking they were an insider. Likewise, there will be outsiders who find out they are ...


1

Acts 2:42 gives us four components of the first local church in Jerusalem. In bullet-point format: "[The Jerusalem saints] were continually devoting themselves to the apostles' teaching . . . fellowship . . . breaking of bread . . . prayer." These four components are foundational in any local church. The Apostles' Teaching At first, ...


1

The order is based on the Vulgate translated by Jerome in the fourth century. However, this was 71 books. Several centuries later, Martin Luther removed some books of the Old Testament which, although they appeared in the Septuagint (the Greek Old Testament), were not part of the Hebrew Bible.


1

I fully believe in the Bible as the perfect word of God without any error whatsoever. I also like the KJV. However, there is no Biblical basis for believing in an inspired translation, from one language to another. This would put translators at the same level as prophets and apostles for they would need a special anointing that determines what scripture is. ...


1

In addition to the criteria mentioned above, historically there was a claim of apostolic authorship. See: http://christianity.stackexchange.com/a/5527/1039


1

Biblical Apocrypha was not part of Old Testament Canon used by Jews in First century Israel. Let me give evidence from Jewish Priest Josephus. Jewish Priest Josephus clearly explains about the Old Testament Canon used in first century AD. Against Apion, Book 1, Paragraph 8. "For we have not an innumerable multitude of books among us, disagreeing from and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible