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I will add to brasshat’s answer the perspective of the Catholic Church. As brasshat mentioned, the Catholic Church does not, in general, recognize the validity of Anglican Holy Orders (see Apostolicae curae, especially number 36), hence—unless a particular cleric can prove that he has obtained valid Holy Orders, say, from an Orthodox bishop—it must conclude ...


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There are three things which are necessary for a sacrament to be valid. The form, the matter, and the intent. I once heard a priest say that he could come riding into the Church naked, on an elephant, and so long as he had unleavened bread and wine, said the mass using the right words, and intended for the Mass to be valid, it would be. Having read the Book ...


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The churches of the Anglican Communion recognize the validity of Holy orders conferred by the Roman Catholic Church, so that a Bishop, Priest or Deacon who converted from Catholicism to Anglicanism, would remain a Bishop, Priest or Deacon, and could serve in the appropriate roles in the Anglican Church, subject to the relevant canon(s) of the various ...


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There is a document issued by the Congregation for Catholic Education (which oversees among other thing the seminary formation of priests) issued in 2005 that goes into detail about policies for admitting those with homosexual tendencies to the priesthood: it has the rather long title Instruction Concerning the Criteria for the Discernment of Vocations with ...


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First, to place the quoted statistics in context, in Gay Catholic Priests and Clerical Sexual Misconduct, at page 2, Donald L. Boisvert and Robert E. Goss cite Reverend Donald Cozzens, respected rector of the Cleveland seminary, from his book, The Changing Face of the Catholic Priesthood that the Catholic priesthood has become a gay profession. Cozzens ...


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Yes, Samuel took over as high priest of the Shiloh sanctuary after the previous high priest Eli and his two sons Hophni and Phineas all died on the same day (1 Samuel 4:11-18), even though his father was an Ephraimite (1:1). One example of his priestly activities is described in 7:5-10. How could this be since he wasn't a descendant of Aaron? The most ...


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A king could also be a priest, just not a member of the Aaronic priesthood. As Mawia has already stated, in pre-monarchic Israel and throughout the Levant, both father (as head of the household) and firstborn sons typically served as priests (e.g., Numbers 3:13). In addition, the king typically served as a priest for the entire nation (as with Melchizedek ...


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As far as doctrine, usually the details of such events aren't explained. Members of the Church usually rely on faith and trust that, because God is all-powerful, He can bring to pass miraculous events in whichever way he may choose. That being said, there is scriptural evidence that can help us to infer what may have happened. For example, it isn't out of ...



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