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Were there female priests in the temple in Jerusalem at any time? Definitely, Yes! Certainly the ‘priestly code’ of early Judaism assigned the duties associated with the korbanot (‘sacrifical offerings’) only to the kohanim (‘priests’) who were specifically sons of Aaron (Ex.40:13-15). The priestly function also included other temple responsibilities, ...


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In theory at least, any unmarried, baptized Catholic man can be elected pope; I say "man" because canon law requires that anyone elected pope be immediately consecrated as a bishop: The Roman Pontiff obtains full and supreme power in the Church by his acceptance of legitimate election together with episcopal consecration. Therefore, a person elected to ...


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The short answer to 'Why are there only male popes?' is 'Because there are only male priests.' The Church spells out the why of that practice in a formal doctrinal statement within the Catechism of the Catholic church -- article 1577 presents the basic support for this position. The Catechism uses varied references to support its teachings: Scripture ...


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Formal Decleration of Pope John Paul II 1994 "Although the teaching that priestly ordination is to be reserved to men alone has been preserved by the constant and universal Tradition of the Church and firmly taught by the magisterium in its more recent documents, at the present time in some places it is nonetheless considered still open to debate, or the ...


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The answer is a definite "no." According to the Torah, only males descended from Aharon (i.e., בְּנֵי אַהֲרֹן) were permitted to be priests (כֹּהֲנִים). In Exo. 40:13-15, it is written, 13 And you shall clothe Aharon with the holy garments, and anoint him, and sanctify him, so that he may be a priest for Me. 14 And you shall bring his sons and clothe ...


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I really don't think so. Although I am not an expert, I took a class about the New Testament last summer (it was academic and spiritual) and in the class my professor taught that there was an outer court called the "court of women", then there was the "inner court" where women weren't allowed, and then there was the temple inside the inner court. Mind you, ...


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Pay close attention to the words and what they are referring to here: 1 Samuel 1:1 There was a certain man of Ramathaim-zophim of the hill country of Ephraim whose name was Elkanah the son of Jeroham, son of Elihu, son of Tohu, son of Zuph, an Ephrathite. Samuel, and even his father, were not Ephrathites, for Ephrathites were generally Judahites. ...



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