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8

The short answer to 'Why are there only male popes?' is 'Because there are only male priests.' The Church spells out the why of that practice in a formal doctrinal statement within the Catechism of the Catholic church -- article 1577 presents the basic support for this position. The Catechism uses varied references to support its teachings: Scripture ...


8

The churches of the Anglican Communion recognize the validity of Holy orders conferred by the Roman Catholic Church, so that a Bishop, Priest or Deacon who converted from Catholicism to Anglicanism, would remain a Bishop, Priest or Deacon, and could serve in the appropriate roles in the Anglican Church, subject to the relevant canon(s) of the various ...


5

St. Alphonsus di Liguori used to pray: "Nos cum prole pia benedicat Virgo Maria." (May the Virgin Mary bless us with her pious offspring [Jesus].) Thus it seems she has the ability to bless, yet this isn't necessarily reserved to ordained priests in all circumstances. She is a "priest" (or sacerdote, "a giver of the sacred"), but she was not ordained a ...


5

The answer is a definite "no." According to the Torah, only males descended from Aharon (i.e., בְּנֵי אַהֲרֹן) were permitted to be priests (כֹּהֲנִים). In Exo. 40:13-15, it is written, 13 And you shall clothe Aharon with the holy garments, and anoint him, and sanctify him, so that he may be a priest for Me. 14 And you shall bring his sons and clothe ...


4

Pay close attention to the words and what they are referring to here: 1 Samuel 1:1 There was a certain man of Ramathaim-zophim of the hill country of Ephraim whose name was Elkanah the son of Jeroham, son of Elihu, son of Tohu, son of Zuph, an Ephrathite. Samuel, and even his father, were not Ephrathites, for Ephrathites were generally Judahites. ...


4

Yes, Samuel took over as high priest of the Shiloh sanctuary after the previous high priest Eli and his two sons Hophni and Phineas all died on the same day (1 Samuel 4:11-18), even though his father was an Ephraimite (1:1). One example of his priestly activities is described in 7:5-10. How could this be since he wasn't a descendant of Aaron? The most ...


4

In theory at least, any unmarried, baptized Catholic man can be elected pope; I say "man" because canon law requires that anyone elected pope be immediately consecrated as a bishop: The Roman Pontiff obtains full and supreme power in the Church by his acceptance of legitimate election together with episcopal consecration. Therefore, a person elected to ...


3

There is a document issued by the Congregation for Catholic Education (which oversees among other thing the seminary formation of priests) issued in 2005 that goes into detail about policies for admitting those with homosexual tendencies to the priesthood: it has the rather long title Instruction Concerning the Criteria for the Discernment of Vocations with ...


2

The idea of the priesthood of Mary "seems to have been around since the writing of the early Fathers of the Church in the 4th century and is wonderfully illustrated in striking mages of Mary dressed in priest’s vestments – some dating from as early as the 6th century." "First of all I would like to refer to the question of the title of priest attributed ...


2

Formal Decleration of Pope John Paul II 1994 "Although the teaching that priestly ordination is to be reserved to men alone has been preserved by the constant and universal Tradition of the Church and firmly taught by the magisterium in its more recent documents, at the present time in some places it is nonetheless considered still open to debate, or the ...


2

Were there female priests in the temple in Jerusalem at any time? Definitely, Yes! Certainly the ‘priestly code’ of early Judaism assigned the duties associated with the korbanot (‘sacrifical offerings’) only to the kohanim (‘priests’) who were specifically sons of Aaron (Ex.40:13-15). The priestly function also included other temple responsibilities, ...


2

A king could also be a priest, just not a member of the Aaronic priesthood. As Mawia has already stated, in pre-monarchic Israel and throughout the Levant, both father (as head of the household) and firstborn sons typically served as priests (e.g., Numbers 3:13). In addition, the king typically served as a priest for the entire nation (as with Melchizedek ...


2

The short answer to the question in the title is “yes,” a priest is a priest forever, and no amount of sinful behavior on his part can change that. However, a Latin-rite priest who is married (save in a very limited number of converts from Anglicanism) would presumably have received an indult to leave the clerical state and a dispensation from the ...


2

I really don't think so. Although I am not an expert, I took a class about the New Testament last summer (it was academic and spiritual) and in the class my professor taught that there was an outer court called the "court of women", then there was the "inner court" where women weren't allowed, and then there was the temple inside the inner court. Mind you, ...


2

There are a lot of protestant churches so it's hard to be exhaustive, but I think the Anglican Church is what you're looking for. After splitting from Rome the Church of England went through a reformation that aligned much of their theology with the Lutheran and Calvinist traditions. You can find this in the 39 articles. For example, this is very ...


1

And the LORD said unto him, Therefore whosoever slayeth Cain, vengeance shall be taken on him sevenfold. And the LORD set a mark upon Cain, lest any finding him should kill him. Genesis 4:15 The Bible never says what the "mark" put on Cain was. And I have never seen any LDS-specific revelation about this mark. wherefore, as they were white, ...


1

People might assume that all black people are cursed. Although there are some recorded instances that having black or dark skin is the result of a curse from God, it should under no circumstances always be assumed as such. This is simply an error of extrapolation. The statement you quote from LDS.org was, is, and will always be correct. Black skin is not ...


1

There are three things which are necessary for a sacrament to be valid. The form, the matter, and the intent. I once heard a priest say that he could come riding into the Church naked, on an elephant, and so long as he had unleavened bread and wine, said the mass using the right words, and intended for the Mass to be valid, it would be. Having read the Book ...



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