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Whether the women "heard God correctly" is largely irrelevant. The Church simply doesn't have the authority to ordain women. For more information, see Women and the Priesthood. My intuition is that "The Church" wouldn't claim, on any case-by-case basis, whether or how God was speaking to "a woman called to the priesthood." An individual spiritual advisor ...


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According to the Catholic Church, Christ gave authority to the disciples, which they in turn gave to their disciples, and so on. Today, to become a Priest in the Catholic Church you must be called to the Sacrament of Holy Orders by the Holy Spirit. Holy Orders is the sacrament through which the mission entrusted by Christ to his apostles continues to be ...


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It wasn't a quick process, it took a while. The Church was not 'extinguished' with the loss of the Apostles, it 'dwindled' away, like a fire burning out without anyone left to tend it. James E. Talmage does an excellent job of describing the process in his book The Great Apostasy. It began with the deaths of the apostles. They held the keys to administer ...


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Can. 1041 The following are irregular for receiving orders: 1/ a person who labors under some form of amentia or other psychic illness due to which, after experts have been consulted, he is judged unqualified to fulfill the ministry properly; 2/ a person who has committed the delict of apostasy, heresy, or schism; 3/ a person who has ...


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The Church has considered the question of the priestly ordination of women for nearly 40 years. The more recent, and more authoritative, pronouncement on the matter is in Ordinatio Sacerdotalis, an Apostolic Letter of Pope St. John Paul II, published in 1994. In this letter, the Pope concluded that in order that all doubt may be removed regarding a ...


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From the point of view of Catholicism, the first part of this question might be, "Why does anyone at all need to consecrate the Eucharist?" After all, if no one needs to consecrate it, then a fortiori it is not necessary for a priest to consecrate it. As usual, I went to the Summa Theologica to check out what the Church's greatest theologian had to say. I ...


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Catholic priests are called 神父 "Shenfu" (Mandarin) or "Sunfu" (Cantonese), literally "God- father". For reference please go to http://zh-yue.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E7%A5%9E%E7%88%B6; then click on English (on the left hand side) to see a (rough, not very precise) translation of the page. Another source is myself: Chinese is my native language and this is the ...


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According to Author: McConkie, Mark L. Latter-day Saint scriptures speak of a unique class of beings, persons whom the Lord has "translated" or changed from a mortal state to one in which they are temporarily not subject to death, and in which they experience neither pain nor sorrow except for the sins of the world. Such beings appear to have much greater ...


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The Catholic Church's answer to a woman or women claiming that God has called them to the Priesthood is "You're mistaken; you didn't hear the call right". The church bases this argument on the fact that the historical Jesus was male, and that there is no reference in the Bible to Jesus having called any women to be an apostle.


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The 1983 Code says: Can. 1024 A baptized male alone receives sacred ordination validly. The 1917 Code elaborates: Canon 968 §1. Only a baptized male validly received sacred ordination; for liceity, however, he should be outstanding in the qualities according to the norm of the sacred canons, in the judgment of the proper Ordinary, and not detained ...


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I submit that there may be a practical reason for the sing-songy voice, and I have tested the reason myself, with the help of a friend. First, I read a passage from Scripture in a normal speaking voice, at normal volume, from the lectern in a large, "traditionally" furnished Episcopal church, and had my friend move back in the nave as I was speaking until ...


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If a candidate lacks the qualities needed for liceity, the ordination is valid but illicit. If it lacks the qualities for validity it is held to be invalid, viz. no actual ordination occurs. The Ordinary's judgement is irrelevant in this case, as God is the judge of validity (and hence manliness, as only a man validly receives Ordination) and no man's ...


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The Encyclopedia of Mormonism's entry on the RLDS Church says, "Local pastors had been initiating priesthood calls for women since 1974, but no clear precedent permitted actual ordination." But of course, the decision was still quite controversial, and led to much splintering of the RLDS church. RLDS member William D. Russell says in his article "Grant ...


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As FMS said - they can speak to the Bishop. Certainly preferences can be discussed and can have influence over the ultimate decision. I go to an Antiochian Orthodox Church - our Priest is from California but serves in Pennsylvania because his wife's family is nearby the area.


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From Clergy | oca.org (Orthodox Church in America), the rector is appointed by the Diocesan Bishop and cannot leave his parish without the permission of the Bishop. Below is the entire section: At the head of the parish is its Rector. According to the teachings of the Church, he is the spiritual father and teacher of his flock and the celebrant of ...


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I know nothing about usage of the word order (except that the ordaining process is a sacrament called Holy Orders), but I can address the first part of your question: what is meant by order (as opposed to jurisdiction)? The answer is that there is a hierarchy of functions or roles in the church's offices. Some offices allow the ordained person to do more ...


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I'm an Anglican vicar. While studying at theological college, every year there was an open event for former students. And every year, you could tell how long they'd been in the wild fairly accurately by whether they had "the voice." Where does it come from? I can think of three plausible reasons. First, lots of big churches have small congregations, who ...


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This answer builds upon and expands upon Jayarathina's answer The following article does not include the reality though that Jayarathina brought up. This reality is that priestesses were common amongst the Pagan world, so for Christ to not have done so, it gives even more reason for why the Catholic Church does not ordain women (it is simply following the ...



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